Education Studies

Jenefer Husman, Department Head
541-346-9564
125C Lorry I. Lokey Education Building

License and degree programs in the Department of Education Studies prepare professionals to work in education. For teaching in elementary grade levels (K–5), the undergraduate major in educational foundations leads to a bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) degree in educational foundations. Undergraduates may also earn a certificate in education foundations—secondary. For teaching in secondary grade levels (6–12), the certificate in educational foundations—secondary is intended to complement the subject area major. 

The master's-level programs include

  1. a degree in curriculum and teaching with a specialization in elementary multiple subjects education or secondary education, which includes a recommendation for a state-approved teaching license and a master of education (MEd) degree
  2. a program in curriculum and teacher education for those already holding a teaching license and are seeking a master of science (MS) degree
  3. add-on endorsements for licensed teachers in English for speakers of other languages and multicultural, multilingual reading

The doctoral degree program leads to a doctor of philosophy degree (PhD) in critical and sociocultural studies in education.

Faculty

Joanna Goode, professor (computer science education, urban education, educational equity and inclusion). BS 1997, MEd, 1998, PhD, 2004, California, Los Angeles. (2005)

Jeanne Nagayama Hall, senior instructor (elementary education, educational psychology, freshman mentoring); undergraduate field experience coordinator; faculty director, freshman multicultural scholars academic residential community. BA, 1978, Azusa Pacific; MEd, 1984, Washington (Seattle). (2002)

Julie Heffernan, senior lecturer (sexuality and gender studies in education, social studies and language arts curriculum, educational equity and inclusion); graduate director, UO Teach. BA, 1990, MEd, 2004, PhD, 2010, Oregon (2013)

Jenefer Husman, associate professor (educational psychology). BS, 1992, Evergreen State College; MA, 1996, PhD, 1998, Texas, Austin. (2016)

Michelle Jacob, professor (Indigenous studies in education, health, gender and decolonization). BA, 1998, MA, 2001, California State, San Marcos; PhD, 2004, California, Santa Barbara. (2016) 

Abby Lane, instructor (bilingual education, English language learners, migrant education). BA, 1983, California State, Northridge; MEd, 1992, Oregon. (2000)

Audrey Lucero, associate professor (literacy, bilingualism, dual-language schooling), BA, BS, 1996, Boston; MIT, 2002, Seattle; PhD, 2011, Washington (Seattle). (2011)

Lisa A. Mazzei, professor (qualitative research methodology, curriculum theory, whiteness studies). BA, 1983, Marshall; MA, 1984, PhD, 1996, Ohio State. (2012)

Edward M. Olivos, associate professor (bilingual education, Latinos and education, teacher preparation). BA, 1991, MA, 1997, PhD, 2003, San Diego State. (2007)

Jerry L. Rosiek, professor (qualitative research methods, teacher education, critical race theory in education research). BA, 1987, BS, 1988, Texas A & M; PhD, 1997, Stanford. (2005)

Jennifer Ruef, assistant professor (mathematics education, equity, inclusion and social justice). BS, 1990, MS, 2005, Wisconsin, Madison; PhD, 2016, Stanford. (2016)

Leilani Sabzalian, assistant professor (indigenous studies in education, teacher education, elementary social studies). BA, 2001, MEd, 2002, PhD, 2015, Oregon. (2017)

Alison Schmitke, senior lecturer (social foundations of education, social studies curriculum, sports education); director, undergraduate degree program. BA, 1994, Willamette; MEd, 1996, Portland State; PhD, 2008, Alabama. (2006)

Sarah Stapleton, assistant professor (food and environmental justice, social contexts of science and environmental education). BA, 2001, Sweet Briar College; EdM, 2005, Harvard; PhD, 2015, Michigan State. (2015)

Emeriti

Juliet "Jill" A. Baxter, associate professor emerita. AB, 1975, MA, 1986, PhD, 1987, Stanford; MA, 1977, Minnesota. (2002)

Edna P. DeHaven, professor emerita. BS, 1951, Oregon College of Education; MEd, 1962, PhD, 1969, Oregon. (1969)

Gary W. Ferrington, senior instructor emeritus. BS, 1964, Portland State; MS, 1967, Southern California. (1967)

M. D. "Mark" Gall, professor emeritus. BA, 1963, MEd, 1963, Harvard; PhD, 1968, California, Berkeley. (1975)

Judith K. Grosenick, professor emerita. BS, 1964, Wisconsin, Oshkosh; MS, 1966, PhD, 1968 Kansas. (1984)

William H. Harris, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1949, Willamette; BS, 1951, MS, 1953, Eastern Oregon; DEd, 1967, Oregon. (1969)

Ray E. Hull, professor emeritus. BS, 1958, MS, 1962, Oregon State; DEd, 1969, Oregon. (1970)

William E. Lamon, associate professor emeritus. BS, 1964, San Francisco; MS, 1965, California State; PhD, 1968, California, Berkeley. (1972)

David G. Moursund, professor emeritus. BA, 1958, Oregon; MS, 1960, PhD, 1963, Wisconsin, Madison. (1967)

Ione F. Pierron, associate professor emerita of librarianship. BA, 1936, Puget Sound; MA, 1955, Minnesota; MS, 1960, Oregon. (1948)

Mildred C. Robeck, professor emerita. BA, 1951, MEd, 1954, PhD, 1958, Washington (Seattle). (1967)

John E. Suttle, professor emeritus. BS, 1948, Texas; MEd, 1952, Colorado; EdD, 1960, Texas. (1959)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Undergraduate Studies

Educational Foundations

The purpose of the educational foundations major is to prepare future professionals in education and related fields: critical thinkers, well-informed about theory and practice, who possess the knowledge and skills to be agents of change in economically, racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse communities. The program focuses on content preparation and provides students with a sophisticated understanding of the intersections of multiple disciplines within larger historical and contemporary themes.

The two-year program, completed during the junior and senior years, prepares undergraduate students for admission into master’s-level teacher certification programs or other Graduate School programs such as social work or psychology. The educational foundations major does not result in a teaching license.

Major Requirements

Students planning to major in educational foundations enter the university as education premajors. Transfer students and university students from other majors may become premajors by submitting a Request for Addition or Deletion Major form, available online. Premajors are not eligible to take most 300- and 400-level education courses. Premajor status does not guarantee admission to the educational foundations major.

The major is designed as a two-year program completed during the undergraduate junior and senior year. The major requires core courses in five areas: learning, teaching, and assessment; curriculum theory; technology and education; literacy; and equality of opportunity. Additional courses are required in mathematics, science, and a variety of other subjects, including reading, art, music, and physical education.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Educational Foundations Lower Division Coursework
EDST 111Education and Social Change4
EDST 211Childhood Studies4
EDST 225School and Representation in Media4
Volunteer or Work Experience 1
Educational Foundations Upper Division Coursework
Theme: Learning, Teaching, and Assessment & Embedded Field Experience
EDST 331Autobiography of Schooling4
EDST 332Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I3
EDST 333Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II3
EDST 338Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I1
EDST 339Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II1
Theme: Curriculum Theory
EDST 342Curriculum Studies I4
EDST 343Curriculum Studies II4
Theme: Technology as Education
EDST 422Technology Education4
Theme: Literacy
EDST 463Foundations of Literacy4
EDST 464Multicultural Literacy4
Theme: Equal Opportunity
EDST 420Living in a Stratified Society4
Select 8 credits from the following:8
Experimental Course: [Topic]
Food and Schools
Poverty and Education
Racism and Education
Patriarchy and Education
Heteronormativity and Education
Decolonization and Education
Immigration, Diaspora and Education
Theme: Specialized Subject Matter Knowledge
EDST 471Foundations of Algebra Learning4
EDST 472Foundations of Geometry Learning4
EDST 440Physical Education for Diverse Learners3
SPED 411Foundations of Disability I3
Total Credits70

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Educational Foundations Lower Division Coursework
EDST 111Education and Social Change4
EDST 211Childhood Studies4
EDST 225School and Representation in Media4
Volunteer or Work Experience 1
Educational Foundations Upper Division Coursework
Theme: Learning, Teaching, and Assessment & Embedded Field Experience
EDST 331Autobiography of Schooling4
EDST 332Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I3
EDST 333Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II3
EDST 338Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I1
EDST 339Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II1
Theme: Curriculum Theory
EDST 342Curriculum Studies I4
EDST 343Curriculum Studies II4
Theme: Technology as Education
EDST 422Technology Education4
Theme: Literacy
EDST 463Foundations of Literacy4
EDST 464Multicultural Literacy4
Theme: Equal Opportunity
EDST 420Living in a Stratified Society4
Select 8 credits from the following:8
Experimental Course: [Topic]
Food and Schools
Poverty and Education
Racism and Education
Patriarchy and Education
Heteronormativity and Education
Decolonization and Education
Immigration, Diaspora and Education
Theme: Specialized Subject Matter Knowledge
MATH 211Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I4
MATH 212Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II4
MATH 213Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III4
EDST 440Physical Education for Diverse Learners3
SPED 411Foundations of Disability I3
Total Credits74

Application and Admission

Students must submit a formal application for admission to the major. Application to the major is made before beginning the junior year of study and may be made only during winter term of each academic year. Seniors who transfer from another university or change their major may be admitted but are not guaranteed graduation within one year. Application materials and directions are available on the College of Education website.

Certificate in Educational Foundations—Secondary

The Certificate in Educational Foundations: Secondary is for undergraduates who are committed to social change through a career in education or a related field. The purpose of the certificate is to prepare future professionals who are critical thinkers, well informed about theory and practice, and who possess the knowledge and skills that will enable them to be change agents in economically, racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse communities. This purpose is achieved by providing students with 1) a broad-based focus on content preparation; 2) a sophisticated understanding of the intersections of multiple disciplines within larger historical and contemporary themes.

The Certificate in Educational Foundations: Secondary is designed to complement the Major/subject area preparation of undergraduates who desire to be middle/high school teachers. The certificate consists of 36 credits (12 lower division; 24 upper division). Rather than waiting until graduate school to begin developing the teacher knowledge necessary for classroom life, the certificate gives students a running start as undergraduates. The set of courses provides developmentally appropriate growth for undergraduate students interested in teaching and the opportunity to obtain prerequisite knowledge to assist them as future graduate students.

This is a pre-professional degree preparing graduates who are highly competitive for admission into master’s level teacher certification programs or other graduate school programs. The Certificate in Educational Foundations: Secondary does not result in a teaching license.

All undergraduates at the University of Oregon wanting to pursue teaching will attend a graduate teacher education program. Many of our undergraduates continue to UOTeach. UOTeach is the graduate teacher education program in the Department of Education Studies. This is a four-term program resulting in a masters of education (MEd) in Curriculum and Teaching and it fulfills the teaching licensure requirements for the state of Oregon (Elementary K-5 or Secondary 6-12.

For more information about UOTeach, students are encouraged to attend an informational meeting. Website: https://education.uoregon.edu/uoteach

Email: uoteach@uoregon.edu

Lower Division12
Education and Social Change
School and Representation in Media
Subject Area Elective in Major (100 or 200 level)
Upper Division24
Field Studies: [Topic]
Foundations of Disability I
Second-Language Acquisition
Subject Area Elective in Major (300 or 400 level)
Living in a Stratified Society
Equal Opportunity - Select two of the following:
Experimental Course: [Topic]
Food and Schools
Poverty and Education
Racism and Education
Patriarchy and Education
Heteronormativity and Education
Decolonization and Education
Immigration, Diaspora and Education

In addition to regular appointments with your primary advisor, schedule an advising appointment with the COE Advising Center each year to make sure you are staying on track with the Certificate requirements. COE Advising Center link: blogs.uoregon.edu/coeundergraduateadvising

Start pre-requisites early so you are able to fit in all upper division courses.

Obtain as much experience as possible with middle/high school ages youth for your graduate school application. Check for opportunities on the EdF blog and for possible opportunities in your EO coursework. EdF Blog link: edf.uoregon.edu.

You are part of the Educational Foundations community – see emails from us for invitations and information!

Need help? Have a question? Please visit edf.uoregon.edu

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Educational Foundations

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
EDST 111 Education and Social Change 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
EDST 225 School and Representation in Media 4
EDST 471 Foundations of Algebra Learning 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
EDST 472 Foundations of Geometry Learning 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 331 Autobiography of Schooling 4
EDST 211 Childhood Studies 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
EDST 332 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I 3
EDST 338 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I 1
EDST 420 Living in a Stratified Society 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 12
Spring
EDST 333 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II 3
EDST 339 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II 1
EDST 440 Physical Education for Diverse Learners 3
EDST 422 Technology Education 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 43
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 456 Decolonization and Education 4
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Immigration, Diaspora and Education
1
MUS 322 Music Fundamentals 3
SPED 411 Foundations of Disability I 3
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 15
Winter
EDST 342 Curriculum Studies I 4
EDST 463 Foundations of Literacy 4
 Credits 8
Spring
EDST 343 Curriculum Studies II 4
EDST 464 Multicultural Literacy 4
EDST 452 Poverty and Education 4
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Heteronormativity and Education
1
 Credits 13
 Total Credits 36

Bachelor of Science in Educational Foundations

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
EDST 111 Education and Social Change 4
MATH 211 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
MATH 212 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II 4
General-education course in social science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
MATH 213 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Minor elective 4
 Credits 16
Spring
General-education course in science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Minor electives 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 331 Autobiography of Schooling 4
EDST 211 Childhood Studies 4
General-education course in science 4
Minor elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
EDST 332 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I 3
EDST 338 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I 1
EDST 420 Living in a Stratified Society 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 12
Spring
EDST 333 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II 3
EDST 339 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II 1
EDST 422 Technology Education 4
EDST 440 Physical Education for Diverse Learners 3
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 43
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 456 Decolonization and Education 4
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Immigration, Diaspora and Education
1
MUS 322 Music Fundamentals 3
SPED 411 Foundations of Disability I 3
 Credits 11
Winter
EDST 342 Curriculum Studies I 4
EDST 463 Foundations of Literacy 4
 Credits 8
Spring
EDST 343 Curriculum Studies II 4
EDST 464 Multicultural Literacy 4
EDST 452 Poverty and Education 4
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Heteronormativity and Education
1
 Credits 13
 Total Credits 32

Master of Education in Curriculum and Teaching (UOTeach)

Students pursuing a master of education degree (MEd) are admitted to the curriculum and teaching major through the K–12 licensure program, UOTeach, which emphasizes the sociocultural context of teaching and learning, culturally sustaining pedagogy, and supportive learning communities. Completion of the program leads to a teaching license and a master of education degree (MEd) in curriculum and teaching.

The UOTeach program offers the following general-education specializations:

1. Elementary Multiple Subjects

2. Middle-High school education, in the following content endorsement areas:

To ensure all graduates are trained to teach culturally and linguistically diverse youth, both specializations include embedded preparation for the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) endorsement.

UOTeach is a four-term, full-time program, though students may opt for for a two-year, part-time program. The graduate program begins in June, preparing students for 34 weeks of progressive field experience in local schools, starting the end of summer term. It is a cohort-based program (students are taught as a community rather than as individuals) in which students explore approaches to teaching and learning that advance equity and access, value student’s strengths, facilitate critical thinking, and reflect culturally responsive methods and practices that serve all learners. Study plans are based on endorsement  area and sequential courses.

Upon successful completion of related course work, field placement, and licensure requirements, candidates are eligible to apply for the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission teaching license. The preliminary teaching licenses and subsequent renewals and out-of-state transfers require a College of Education program completion report.

Elementary Multiple Subjects:

EDST 612Foundations of Teaching and Learning (*)3
EDST 616Language, Power, and Education4
EDST 620Curricular Controversies: Math and Literacy4
EDST 627Mgmt: Introduction to Supportive Learning Communities1
SPED 511Foundations of Disability I (*)3
EDST 614Cultural Context of Education (*)4
EDST 617Sapsik'ʷałá Indigenous Education Seminar (Sapsik'ʷałá Indigenous Teaching Seminar, in production)4
EDST 640Methods: Constructing Meaning through Literacy4
EDST 642Methods: Humanities Pedagogy4
EDST 643Methods: Teaching Mathematics-Facts and Inquiry4
EDST 628Mgmt: Creating Supportive Classroom Communities3
EDST 645Methods: Teaching Science-Detail and Discovery4
EDST 646Methods ESOL: Eng Lang Learners Pedagogy Elementary Classrm4
EDST 647
EDST 681Elementary Part-Time Teaching (Elementary Part-Time Student Teaching Practicum and Seminar , Currently )4
EDST 683Elementary Full-Time Student Teaching (Elementary FT Student Teaching, in production)10
EDST 682Elementary Teaching Performance Assessment (Elementary Student Teaching Seminar, in process)2
Minimum Required Credits 162

Mid/High School Education (Subject Areas):

EDST 612Foundations of Teaching and Learning3
EDST 616Language, Power, and Education4
EDST 630Curriculum Studies and the Profession of Teaching4
EDST 627Mgmt: Introduction to Supportive Learning Communities1
SPED 511Foundations of Disability I (*)3
EDST 614Cultural Context of Education (*)4
EDST 617Sapsik'ʷałá Indigenous Education Seminar (Sapsik'ʷałá Indigenous Teaching Seminar, in production)1-4
EDST 638Methods ESOL: English Language Learners Pedagogy Humanities4
EDST 621Methods: Representing Mathematical Concepts4
Elective Courses 16-8
EDST 623Methods: Representing Science Concepts4
EDST 631Methods ELA: Representing Literature to Young People4
EDST 635Methods: Representing Social Studies Concepts4
EDST 628Mgmt: Creating Supportive Classroom Communities3
EDST 622Methods: Mathematical Problem-Solving Curriculum4
EDST 624Methods: Scientific Problem-Solving Curriculum4
EDST 632Methods: Engaging Students in Writing4
EDST 634Methods: Second-Language Conversation and Composition4
EDST 636Methods: Social Studies Inquiry and Analysis4
EDST 618Methods ESOL: Teaching English Language Development, K–123
EDST 686Secondary Part-Time Teaching (Mid/High PT Student Teaching and Practicum Seminar, in production)4
EDST 687Secondary Teaching Performance Assessment (Mid/High Student Teaching Seminar, in production)2
EDST 688Secondary Full-Time Student Teaching (Mid/High Full Time Student Teaching, in production)10
EDST 647 (ELL Instructional Methods II: Applied, in production)4
Minimum Required Credits 262

More information on the UOTeach Curriculum & Teaching MEd / Licensure program is available at https://education.uoregon.edu/uoteach

Application and Admission

UOTeach prepares teacher leaders to have a lasting impact on the learning and lives of youth. We have an open-door policy, welcoming applicants with demonstrated academic distinction, the disposition and passion for learning and working with youth, and a commitment to supporting equitable educational learning communities.

UOTeach is committed to helping reshape the classroom experience for all students through increasing the numbers of educator candidates from underrepresented groups, including bilingual bicultural candidates, people with disabilities, and first-generation college students.

As a state-approved program, UOTeach adheres to Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSCP), University of Oregon, and College of Education standards.

Admissions is competitive but we look holistically at each candidate. Applicants are scored on the criteria listed below. Higher scores lead to a higher likelihood of acceptance to the program.

Our graduate school application is open Sept 20 to January 15 annually, for June start.

Master of Science in Curriculum and Teacher Education

Core Courses
Foundations of education courses8
Teacher professionalism courses8
Research methodology courses8
Specialization Courses
Program courses16
Electives16
Total Credits56

This program is designed for those who already hold a teaching license but want to build on their knowledge by adding a master's degree. Study plans are individualized based on an applicant’s educational pursuits. The program accepts applicants on an annual basis. Interested applicants may access the application from October through January 30; the program begins summer session, in June.

Enrollment is limited. Program admission is based on grade point average, recommendations, need in the field, and the results of an interview.  See the website for application details.

Application and Admissions

Enrollment is limited. Program admission is based on grade point average, recommendations, need in the field, and the interview. See the website for application details.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement

English learners and emerging bilinguals face linguistic and cultural barriers when acquiring context knowledge in a mainstream classroom. The add-on endorsements in ESOL and ESOL–bilingual education prepare educators to serve students who enter the public school system with a native language other than English. In addition, this endorsement equips teachers with an awareness of the challenges students face in developing English language proficiency and content simultaneously, and how effective use of culturally relevant materials and teaching strategies can help to counteract this challenge.

Licensed teachers who complete the ESOL program demonstrate the following:

  • proficiency in planning, delivery, and assessment of English language development instruction
  • knowledge of effective inclusive language development program models 
  • ability to serve as a resource to classroom teachers to ensure a student's successful transition from an English language development program to mainstream classrooms
  • ability to serve as an advocate for emerging bilinguals who supports equity and access in educational settings

ESOL Endorsement Requirements

Courses16
Practicum3
Total Credits19

The program for the ESOL endorsement requires satisfactory completion of 19 credits, including four courses and a practicum. This endorsement allows licensed teachers to become ESOL specialists.

Students who have completed an ESOL endorsement and are proficient in another language may add the bilingual endorsement by passing the appropriate Oregon Educator Licensure Assessments–National Evaluation Series language test. No course work is necessary for the bilingual endorsement.

Application and Admissions

Applicants must hold a teaching license. Students are admitted on a rolling basis but typically begin the program in summer or fall. For application information and deadlines, visit the website.

Licensure

Licensure programs of the Department of Education Studies meet the requirements for the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for a preliminary teacher license in elementary multiple subjects and middle or high school education content areas. Endorsements are available in ESOL and ESOL-bilingual specialization and reading.

Doctor of Philosophy in Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education

The University of Oregon doctor of philosophy degree (PhD) in critical and sociocultural studies in education is designed to prepare scholars who intend to be active in the professional research association in their field, publish research in peer-reviewed journals and academic presses, secure positions as faculty members at research universities or research centers, or work at state and federal agencies.

The program provides a comprehensive approach to educational research that considers the consequences of contemporary schooling systems while developing alternatives to current practices that result in systemic change. To provide concentrated faculty support and mentorship for each student, only a small cohort of seven to ten students are accepted every other year, with admission in the fall of odd-numbered years.

The program of study includes a strong foundation in both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. In addition to the required courses, students will take three additional core courses in CSSE. These courses align with faculty research interests and are offered on a rotating basis. In general, one or two core courses are offered every academic year, so it is recommended that students plan accordingly to ensure that they will be able to take three core courses in a timely manner.

In addition, students complete a supervised research apprenticeship in the second year of study and devise a set of cognate courses in consultation with an advisor.

Admission

The program is small—fewer than 10 students are typically admitted every two years. Applications are accepted from early fall through mid-January for admission in odd-numbered years. The next cohort will be admitted for fall 2023. Application details are available online.

Courses

Course usage information

EDST 111. Education and Social Change. 4 Credits.

Students will evaluate historical, philosophical, and social viewpoints related to the purposes and goals of American education. Additionally, students will compare/contrast multiple approaches to address a range of challenges and opportunities in American schools.

Course usage information

EDST 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Exploring Educational Studies.

Course usage information

EDST 211. Childhood Studies. 4 Credits.

Examines child development from within the context of specific development and ecological theories.

Course usage information

EDST 220. Beginning Applications in Educational Technology. 4 Credits.

Development of skills and exploration of computer applications useful for communicating in an educational setting.

Course usage information

EDST 225. School and Representation in Media. 4 Credits.

Examines popular culture’s influence on schools and teachers along with the various mediating factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality.

Course usage information

EDST 331. Autobiography of Schooling. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to engage students in a critical reflection on life in classrooms through recognizing and questioning the assumptions underlying the routine of school. Includes analysis of critical autobiographies, case studies, readings along with application activities. Sequence with EDST 332, EDST 333.
Prereq: EDST 111, EDST 211.

Course usage information

EDST 332. Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I. 3 Credits.

Students move beyond their own critical autobiographies of life in classrooms into various disciplinary literatures on learning, teaching, and assessment.
Prereq: EDST 331; coreq: EDST 338.

Course usage information

EDST 333. Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II. 3 Credits.

Focus on specific school subjects that provide a context for examining the basic assumptions underlying teaching, learning, and assessment.
Prereq: EDST 332; coreq: EDST 339.

Course usage information

EDST 338. Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I. 1 Credit.

Students focus on listening to children to better understand how they make sense of school subjects.
Pre- or coreq: EDST 332.

Course usage information

EDST 339. Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II. 1 Credit.

Focuses on developing skills in observation of learning, teaching, and assessments.
Coreq: EDST 333.

Course usage information

EDST 342. Curriculum Studies I. 4 Credits.

This course will examine the development of curriculum theory through analysis of a collection of pivotal readings authored by influential scholars from the 18th and 19th centuries paired with contemporary writings that link historical developments with current policy and practice.Sequence with EDST 333.
Prereq: EDST 333.

Course usage information

EDST 343. Curriculum Studies II. 4 Credits.

Examines basic assumptions underlying curriculum development in K-12 schools.
Prereq: EDST 342.

Course usage information

EDST 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Exploring Educational Studies, IDEA Reading.

Course usage information

EDST 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 402. Supervised College Teaching. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Educational Foundations.

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EDST 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Professional Practices, Education for Minority Students, Reading in the Upper Elementary Grades.

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EDST 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Integrated Licensure I, II, III.

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EDST 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Foundations of Education, Science and Health Methods, Social Studies and Language Arts Methods.

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EDST 420. Living in a Stratified Society. 4 Credits.

Examines the role of public education in the social context of the United States. The purpose of the course is to develop critical ways of thinking about schools as institutions that both reproduce and challenge social inequality.
Prereq: EDST 111, EDST 225.

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EDST 422. Technology Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational technology, including the theoretical, methodological, practical, and policy issues that influence the field.

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EDST 440. Physical Education for Diverse Learners. 3 Credits.

Provides a variety of physical education and fitness activities appropriate for children with diverse abilities.

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EDST 450. Food and Schools. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on a topic that has typically been omitted from education courses and programs: food. Through this course, we will be thinking about the ways that food intersects with schools, and the implications of this for formal and informal educators.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 452. Poverty and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way poverty structures and mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 453. Racism and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines multiple ways institutionalized racism structures and mediates educational experience and multiple visions of anti-racist teaching.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 454. Patriarchy and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way gender affects educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 455. Heteronormativity and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way sexuality and sexual identity influence the educational experiences of students.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 456. Decolonization and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational institutions and their continuing part in larger social processes of colonization and cultural genocide.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 457. Immigration, Diaspora and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students specifically.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 458. Observation: Equal Opportunity I. 1 Credit.

Engages students in the analysis of specific dimensions of educational opportunity in the field. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 3 credits.
Prereq: EDST 420; coreq: one from EDST 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457.

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EDST 463. Foundations of Literacy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the various theoretical dimensions of reading and writing that form the foundation for understanding and teaching the complex texts children encounter today.
Prereq: EDST 333.

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EDST 464. Multicultural Literacy. 4 Credits.

Introduces preservice teachers to literature written from ethnic, linguistic, social, and cultural perspectives and draws connections to broader cultural, social, historical, economic, and political contexts.
Prereq: EDST 420.

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EDST 471. Foundations of Algebra Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of algebra. Sequence with EDST 472.

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EDST 472. Foundations of Geometry Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of geometry. Sequence with EDST 471.
Prereq: EDST 471.

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EDST 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Professional Practices, Education for Minority Students, Reading in the Upper Elementary Grades.

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EDST 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Foundations of Education, Science and Health Methods, Social Studies and Language Arts Methods.

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EDST 522. Technology Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational technology, including the theoretical, methodological, practical, and policy issues that influence the field.

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EDST 550. Food and Schools. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on a topic that has typically been omitted from education courses and programs: food. Through this course, we will be thinking about the ways that food intersects with schools, and the implications of this for formal and informal educators.

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EDST 552. Poverty and Education. 1,4 Credit.

Examines the way poverty structures and mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.

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EDST 553. Racism and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines multiple ways institutionalized racism structures and mediates educational experience and multiple visions of anti-racist teaching.

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EDST 554. Patriarchy and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way gender affects educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.

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EDST 555. Heteronormativity and Education. 3 Credits.

Examines the way sexuality and sexual identity influence the educational experiences of students.

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EDST 556. Decolonization and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational institutions and their continuing part in larger social processes of colonization and cultural genocide.

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EDST 557. Immigration, Diaspora and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students specifically.

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EDST 558. Observation: Equal Opportunity I. 1 Credit.

Engages students in the analysis of specific dimensions of educational opportunity in the field. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 3 credits.

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EDST 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 605. Reading & Conference: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 610. Experimental Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 612. Foundations of Teaching and Learning. 3 Credits.

Provides students with the psychological foundations of teaching and learning.

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EDST 614. Cultural Context of Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the cultural foundations of educational practice through a critical review of four decades of ethnographic research on school and student culture.

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EDST 616. Language, Power, and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the politics, policies, and practical realities associated with language and literacy in educational settings and how these issues affect all students to some degree.

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EDST 617. Sapsik'ʷałá Indigenous Education Seminar. 1-4 Credits.

Students in the Sapsik'ʷałá (Teacher) Education Program study Indigenous teaching methods, including decolonizing, Indigenous feminist, and Elder pedagogies, and reflect on and analyze the importance of their own work as Indigenous educators who are contributing to Indigenous self-determination in education and Tribal Nation building.
Prereq: Course is limited to Sapsik'ʷałá Program students.

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EDST 618. Methods ESOL: Teaching English Language Development, K–12. 3 Credits.

Examines best practices of delivering English-language development in light of federal and state standards, including teaching methods, technology, and parental involvement.

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EDST 620. Curricular Controversies: Math and Literacy. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the debates that influence, and in some cases overshadow, the teaching of mathematics and literacy from kindergarten to grade 12. Sequence with EDST 621, EDST 640.

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EDST 621. Methods: Representing Mathematical Concepts. 4 Credits.

Students deepen their content knowledge, widen their understanding of student conceptualizations of mathematics, and reflect on their own mathematics instructional practices. Sequence with EDST 620, 622, 625, 626.

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EDST 622. Methods: Mathematical Problem-Solving Curriculum. 4 Credits.

Prepares students to view mathematics as a problem-solving field rather than a set of discrete skills and operational rules. Sequence with EDST 620, 621, 625, 626.
Prereq: EDST 621.

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EDST 623. Methods: Representing Science Concepts. 4 Credits.

Examines why science is taught, what science subjects need to be taught, and how science is learned. Sequence with EDST 620, 624, 625, 626.

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EDST 624. Methods: Scientific Problem-Solving Curriculum. 4 Credits.

Presents science as a problem-solving field rather than a set of discrete facts and concepts. Introduces scientific literacy as the aim of science teaching. Sequence with EDST 620, 623, 625, 626.
Prereq: EDST 623.

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EDST 627. Mgmt: Introduction to Supportive Learning Communities. 1 Credit.

Introduces the teacher candidate to the necessary components for creating supportive and successful classroom communities, including interaction between motivation, “classroom management,” and teacher-student relationships. Sequence with EDST 628.

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EDST 628. Mgmt: Creating Supportive Classroom Communities. 3 Credits.

Builds on EDST 627 by providing specific research, experience, and strategies for developing classroom environments where student behaviors are focused on learning. Sequence with EDST 627.
Prereq: EDST 627.

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EDST 630. Curriculum Studies and the Profession of Teaching. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of ways curriculum is conceptualized at the secondary level.Sequence with EDST 631, EDST 632 (or EDST 633, EDST 634 or EDST 635, EDST 636); EDST 637; EDST 638.

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EDST 631. Methods ELA: Representing Literature to Young People. 4 Credits.

Examines why literature is taught and the way teachers represent literary works to students. Sequence with EDST 630, 632, 637, 638.

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EDST 632. Methods: Engaging Students in Writing. 4 Credits.

Overview of strategies and tools for engaging students in the writing process. Emphasis on genres of writing and use of technology to enhance student writing. Sequence with EDST 630, 631, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 631.

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EDST 634. Methods: Second-Language Conversation and Composition. 4 Credits.

Advanced teaching methodologies, techniques, and skills to effectively promote proficiency and fluency in second languages. Sequence with EDST 630, 633, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 633.

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EDST 635. Methods: Representing Social Studies Concepts. 4 Credits.

Examines why social studies is taught and the way teachers represent social studies concepts to students. Sequence with EDST 630, 636, 637, 638.

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EDST 636. Methods: Social Studies Inquiry and Analysis. 4 Credits.

Explores the theory and practice of teaching social studies as a specialized form of inquiry. Sequence with EDST 630, 635, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 635.

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EDST 638. Methods ESOL: English Language Learners Pedagogy Humanities. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English language learners in meeting the curricular mandates of mainstream language arts and social studies courses. Sequence with EDST 630; 631, 632 (or 633, 634 or 635, 636); 637.

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EDST 640. Methods: Constructing Meaning through Literacy. 4 Credits.

Provides concepts and strategies used in teaching children to read. Focuses in particular on instruction for beginning and intermediate readers and writers. Sequence with EDST 641.

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EDST 642. Methods: Humanities Pedagogy. 4 Credits.

Explores the application of language arts and social studies methods and strategies for future elementary school practitioners.

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EDST 643. Methods: Teaching Mathematics-Facts and Inquiry. 4 Credits.

Focuses on four areas of instruction crucial to becoming a skillful beginning teacher of mathematics. Sequence with EDST 644.

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EDST 645. Methods: Teaching Science-Detail and Discovery. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes science as a process of contemplating, exploring, and raising questions about the world in elementary classrooms.

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EDST 646. Methods ESOL: Eng Lang Learners Pedagogy Elementary Classrm. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English language learners in meeting the mandates of elementary-level curriculum.

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EDST 650. Teacher Education: Policy and Practice. 4 Credits.

Explores the work of contemporary scholars who are attempting to bridge the division between policy and practice in teacher education. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 654. Learning and Motivational Sciences. 4 Credits.

Survey of the learning and motivational sciences for advanced graduate students. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 660. Urban Schools: History and Politics. 4 Credits.

Examines the historical, economic, political, legal, and social context of contemporary urban schooling systems. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 661. Sociology: From Reproduction to Resistance. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the ways schools reproduce, reinforce, and challenge prevailing social, economic, and political relationships. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 662. Curriculum Theory: Contesting Educational Content. 4 Credits.

Survey of the history of curriculum theory, the subfield that asks the fundamental question, what is worth teaching? Offered alternate years.

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EDST 663. Education and Immigration. 4 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students, with an emphasis onbilingual education policy. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 664. Seminar in Bilingualism and Biliteracy. 4 Credits.

This doctoral seminar explores multiple aspects of bilingualism and biliteracy in the United States. The emphasis is on the ways in which bilingualism and biliteracy develop in culturally and linguistically diverse communities and for people from different language groups.

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EDST 666. Thesis Writing. 4 Credits.

Seminar for doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy. Emphasis is on support through the dissertation proposal writing process. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

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EDST 667. Grant Writing: Finding Funders. 4 Credits.

Provides graduate students with the knowledge and skills needed to write successful grant proposals for research, professional development, and curriculum development projects.

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EDST 673. Advanced Qualitative Methodology: Arts-Based Approaches. 4 Credits.

Examines contemporary reflexive social science research writing, focusing on experimentations with the form used by researchers to communicate insights about human affairs.
Pre- or coreq: EDUC 630, EDUC 632, EDUC 634.

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EDST 681. Elementary Part-Time Teaching. 4 Credits.

Provides scope, structure, supervision oversight, and guidance to support students during the part-time student teaching practicum in an Elementary school setting. Is first of two terms of clinical placement that together satisfy the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission intensive and extensive field-based requirements.Repeatable one time for a maximum of 8 credits.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience prior to enrollment.

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EDST 682. Elementary Teaching Performance Assessment. 2 Credits.

Provides scope, structure, supervision oversight, and guidance to support pre-service teachers during their fulltime student teaching (EDST 683) and together are the last of two terms of clinical placement that together satisfy the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) intensive and extensive field-based requirement.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience prior to enrollment.

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EDST 683. Elementary Full-Time Student Teaching. 10 Credits.

The Elementary fulltime student teaching is designed to give candidates the opportunity to gradually take the lead in preparation, instruction, and assessment for the classroom. This experience helps develop knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to make a positive impact on student learning.Repeatable one time for a maximum of 20 hours.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience prior to enrollment.

Course usage information

EDST 686. Secondary Part-Time Teaching. 4 Credits.

Provides scope, structure, supervision oversight, and guidance to support students in part-time pre-service student teaching practicum in an Mid-High School setting. The first of two terms of clinical placement that together satisfy the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission intensive and extensive field-based experience.Repeatable one time for a maximum of 8 credits.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience.

Course usage information

EDST 687. Secondary Teaching Performance Assessment. 2 Credits.

Provides scope, structure, supervision oversight, and guidance to support students during the full-time student teaching practicum in Mid/High School settings. Is the second of two terms of clinical placement that together satisfy the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission intensive and extensive field-based requirements.Repeatable twice for a maximum of 4 credits.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience prior to enrollment.

Course usage information

EDST 688. Secondary Full-Time Student Teaching. 10 Credits.

The Secondary full-time student teaching is designed to give candidate the opportunity to gradually take the lead in preparation, instruction, and assessment for the classroom. This experience helps develop knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to make a positive impact on student learning.Repeatable one time for a maximum of 20 credits.
Prereq: Must complete all prior UOTeach course work with a cumulative 3.00 GPA or higher and have successfully completed prior term of field experience prior to enrollment.