Counseling Psychology and Human Services

Elizabeth Stormshak, Department Head
541-346-9148
541-346-0683 fax
240 HEDCO Education Building

Programs in the Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services educate and train professionals in counseling psychology, couples and family therapy, prevention science, and family and human services. Students are trained to effectively identify, prevent, and treat psychological and public health problems in children, adolescents, adults, and families. At the doctoral level, students extend scientific knowledge through research in collaboration with faculty mentors. Field placements, practicum placements, and internships at all levels of training provide students with opportunities to practice in schools, community agencies, and clinical and research settings under the supervision of faculty members, agency personnel, and collaborating scholars.

Faculty

Tiffany Brown, senior lecturer (self-harm, family dynamics of addiction, collegiate recovery communities). BS, 2002, MEd, 2005, Oregon; PhD, 2009, Texas Tech. (2011)

Elizabeth Budd, assistant professor (early chronic disease prevention, physical activity and healthy eating promotion, adolescent and community health). BS, 2005, Santa Clara; MPH, 2009, Saint Louis; PhD, 2016, Washington (St. Louis). (2016)

Krista Chronister,  professor (domestic violence, career counseling, community intervention). BS, 1996, Florida; MS, 2000, PhD, 2003, Oregon. (2003)

Jessica Cronce, associate professor (health and risk behaviors among young adults, individual-focused prevention). BS, 1999, Washington (Seattle); MS, 2005, MPhil, 2006, PhD, 2009, Yale. (2015)

Dave DeGarmo, research associate professor (prevention science methodology, longitudinal analysis, fathers and parenting). BA, 1987, Lock Haven; MS, 1989, PhD, 1993, Akron. (2013).

Wendy Hadley, Julie and Keith Thomson Faculty Chair and HEDCO Clinic Director, associate professor (adolescent sexual and substance use risk prevention, adolescent obesity, technology interventions). BS, 1994, University of Florida; MS, 2000, PhD, 2003, University of Memphis. (2019)

Nichole Kelly, assistant professor (obesity prevention and adolescent health, eating disorders, health promotion). BS, 2004, Virginia; PhD, 2013, Virginia Commonwealth. (2016)

Atika Khurana, associate professor (adolescent development and risk-taking, self-regulation and executive functions, family and ecological influences). BS, 2003, MS, 2005, Panjab; PhD, 2009, Ohio State. (2012)

Jean Kjellstrand, assistant professor (corrections-involved families, positive youth development, reentry and preventive interventions). BA, 1989, Carleton College; MSW, 1991, Wisconsin, Madison; PhD, 2009, Portland State. (2014)

Leslie Leve, professor (foster care, adoption, prevention science). BA. 1990, California, Santa Cruz; MS, 1991, PhD, 1995, Oregon. (2013)

Benedict T. McWhirter, professor (adolescents at risk, college student development, connectedness). BA, 1986, Notre Dame; MC, 1988, PhD, 1992, Arizona State. (1997)

Ellen Hawley McWhirter, Ann Swindells Professor in Counseling Psychology (adolescent career development, empowerment, Latino youth academic success). BA, 1983, Notre Dame; MC, 1988, PhD, 1992, Arizona State. (1997)

Bertranna Muruthi, assistant professor (interventions and prevention programs for immigrant families). BA, 2010, MS, 2012, Miami (OH); PhD, 2017, Georgia. (2019)

James Muruthi, assistant professor (family and neighborhood factors, social capital and health disparities among aging marginalized individuals). BS, 2007, MS, 2010, Miami (OH); PhD, 2016, Georgia. (2019)

Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Philip H. Knight Chair; professor (prevention of delinquency, conduct problems, peer rejection). BA, 1988, Washington (Seattle); MS, 1992, PhD, 1995, Pennsylvania State. (1996)

Emily Tanner-Smith, associate professor (applied research methodology, meta-analysis, substance use and addiction). BS. 2003, Belmont; MA, 2007, PhD, 2009, Vanderbilt. (2017)

Jeff Todahl, associate professor (child abuse and neglect prevention, intimate partner violence, community engagement). BA, 1985, Western Washington; MS, 1989, Seattle Pacific; PhD, 1995, Florida State. (1999)

Karrie P. Walters, senior instructor (human services, child and family interventions, prevention and social justice). BA, 1996, North Texas; MA, 2001, Minnesota, Twin Cities; PhD, 2010, Oregon. (2010)

Courtesy

Joseph Arpaia, courtesy assistant professor (clinical hypnosis, autonomic nervous system, mediation and psychotherapy). BS, 1982, California Institute of Technology; MD, 1990, California, Irvine. (2005)

Philip A. Fisher, professor. See Psychology.

Richard D. Freund, courtesy assistant professor (research methods, community college counseling, cognitive therapy). BA, 1966, Brown; PhD, 1971, Stanford. (1975)

Lauren Lindstrom, professor (career development, youth with disabilities, gender equity). BS, 1985, MS, 1991, PhD, 2000, Oregon. (2000)

Emeriti

Henry F. Dizney, professor emeritus. BS, 1954, Southeast Missouri State; MEd, 1955, Wayne State; PhD, 1959, Iowa. (1967)

Gordon A. Dudley, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1956, Kalamazoo; MA, 1959, Colorado; EdD, 1971, Harvard. (1967)

Sally Fullerton, professor emerita. BS, 1956, Oregon State; MA, 1960, Cornell; PhD, 1970, Oregon. (1970)

Weston H. Morrill, professor emeritus. BS, 1960, MS, 1961, Brigham Young; PhD, 1966, Missouri, Columbia. (1990)

Shoshana D. Kerewsky, senior lecturer II emerita. BA, 1983, Swarthmore; MA, 1990, Lesley; PsyD, 1998, Antioch, New England. (1996)

Janet Moursund, associate professor emerita. BA, 1958, Knox; MS, 1961, PhD, 1963, Wisconsin, Madison. (1967)

Anita Runyan, associate professor emerita. BS, 1956, Pacific Union; MS, 1968, PhD, 1972, Oregon. (1972)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Family and Human Services

Krista Chronister, Major Director
340 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-2143
fhs@uoregon.edu

The family and human services major leads to a bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS), or bachelor of education (BEd) degree. The family and human services major offers two pathways or emphases for study, the Prevention Science (PS) emphasis or Direct Service Intensive (DSI) emphasis. All FHS students are admitted into the Prevention Science emphasis. Students who wish to complete the DSI emphasis must apply.

The PS emphasis is 54 credits and allows students to study the application of research to prevent conditions that negatively impact well-being and focus on studying the design and evaluation of preventive interventions. The DSI emphasis is 64 credits and allows students to study the delivery of preventive interventions, treatment, and recovery support services and to gain applied practicum experience in community social services agencies to apply the knowledge and skills that they have learned.

Careers

Graduates find work as entry-level professionals in a variety of community services and governmental agencies, and many pursue graduate work in disciplines such as counseling psychology, couple and family therapy, prevention science, education, special education, early intervention, agency management and leadership, social work, human development, and family studies.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services3
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies
CPSY 217Foundations of Student Health and Well-Being3
FHS 301Writing for Human Services Professionals3
FHS 328Human Development in the Family Context3
FHS 330Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts4
FHS 331Group and Community Interventions3
FHS 420Research in Human Services3
or PSY 303 Research Methods in Psychology: [Topic]
or SOC 311 Research Methods
FHS 471Human Services Professional Ethics3
FHS 492Contemporary Issues in Public Health3
Advanced Interventions & Case Management3
Child and Family Case Management
Adolescent and Adult Case Management
Research Experience1
Research: [Topic]
Equity and Diversity4
Sexuality and Culture
Science, Race, and Society
American Deaf Culture
Restorative Justice
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Social Equity and Criminal Justice
Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Philosophy and Cultural Diversity
Social and Political Philosophy
Social Inequality
Social Issues and Movements
Race and Ethnicity
Sociology of Gender
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Introduction to Queer Studies
Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture
Queer Theory
Women, Work, and Class
Professional Depth6
Introduction to Counseling Psychology Profession
Youth Psychopathology in Context
Prevention Science in Practice
Prevention Science in Practice Supervision
Prevention of Youth Violence
Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics
Introduction to City Planning
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
Quantitative Methods
Introduction to Public Law
Grant Proposal Writing
Strategic Planning for Management
Scientific Thinking in Psychology
Psychopathology
Culture and Mental Health
Community, Environment, and Society
Statistical Analysis in Sociology
Behavior and Classroom Management
Scientific Analysis in Human Services
Direct Service Intensive Pathway Emphasis: Practicum
FHS 472Human Services in Practice8
FHS 473Human Services in Practice Supervision4
Total Credits62

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services3
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies
CPSY 217Foundations of Student Health and Well-Being3
FHS 301Writing for Human Services Professionals3
FHS 328Human Development in the Family Context3
FHS 330Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts4
FHS 331Group and Community Interventions3
FHS 420Research in Human Services3
or PSY 303 Research Methods in Psychology: [Topic]
or SOC 311 Research Methods
FHS 471Human Services Professional Ethics3
FHS 492Contemporary Issues in Public Health3
Advanced Interventions & Case Management3
Child and Family Case Management
Adolescent and Adult Case Management
Research Experience1
Research: [Topic]
Equity and Diversity4
Sexuality and Culture
Science, Race, and Society
American Deaf Culture
Restorative Justice
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Social Equity and Criminal Justice
Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Philosophy and Cultural Diversity
Social and Political Philosophy
Social Inequality
Social Issues and Movements
Race and Ethnicity
Sociology of Gender
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Introduction to Queer Studies
Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture
Queer Theory
Women, Work, and Class
Professional Depth6
Introduction to Counseling Psychology Profession
Youth Psychopathology in Context
Prevention Science in Practice
Prevention Science in Practice Supervision
Prevention of Youth Violence
Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics
Introduction to City Planning
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
Quantitative Methods
Introduction to Public Law
Grant Proposal Writing
Strategic Planning for Management
Scientific Thinking in Psychology
Psychopathology
Culture and Mental Health
Community, Environment, and Society
Statistical Analysis in Sociology
Behavior and Classroom Management
FHS 490Scientific Analysis in Human Services3
Direct Service Intensive Pathway Emphasis: Practicum
FHS 472Human Services in Practice8
FHS 473Human Services in Practice Supervision4
Total Credits65

Bachelor of Education Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services3
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies
CPSY 217Foundations of Student Health and Well-Being3
FHS 301Writing for Human Services Professionals3
FHS 328Human Development in the Family Context3
FHS 330Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts4
FHS 331Group and Community Interventions3
FHS 420Research in Human Services3
or PSY 303 Research Methods in Psychology: [Topic]
or SOC 311 Research Methods
FHS 471Human Services Professional Ethics3
FHS 492Contemporary Issues in Public Health3
Advanced Interventions & Case Management3
Child and Family Case Management
Adolescent and Adult Case Management
Research Experience1
Research: [Topic]
Equity and Diversity4
Sexuality and Culture
Science, Race, and Society
American Deaf Culture
Restorative Justice
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Social Equity and Criminal Justice
Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Philosophy and Cultural Diversity
Social and Political Philosophy
Social Inequality
Social Issues and Movements
Race and Ethnicity
Sociology of Gender
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Introduction to Queer Studies
Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture
Queer Theory
Women, Work, and Class
Professional Depth6
Introduction to Counseling Psychology Profession
Youth Psychopathology in Context
Prevention Science in Practice
Prevention Science in Practice Supervision
Prevention of Youth Violence
Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics
Introduction to City Planning
Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
Quantitative Methods
Introduction to Public Law
Grant Proposal Writing
Strategic Planning for Management
Scientific Thinking in Psychology
Psychopathology
Culture and Mental Health
Community, Environment, and Society
Statistical Analysis in Sociology
Behavior and Classroom Management
FHS 490Scientific Analysis in Human Services3
Direct Service Intensive Pathway Emphasis: Practicum
FHS 472Human Services in Practice8
FHS 473Human Services in Practice Supervision4
Total Credits65

Direct Service Intensive Pathway

The Family and Human Sciences degree programs default into the Prevention Science pathway. Students may request to instead fulfill the requirements for the Direct Service Intensive Pathway listed below:

Human Services: Practice8
Human Services in Practice
Human Services Practice Supervision4
Human Services in Practice Supervision
Direct Service Intensive Capstone2

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

In addition to required course work, those working toward all degrees listed below must participate in work or volunteer experiences related to human services and maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 or better.

Bachelor of Arts in Family and Human Services

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
Elective course 3
 Credits 15
Winter
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
Elective course 3
 Credits 15
Spring
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 46
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Prepare application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Submit application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Complete all specified family and human services major admission requirements  
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 328 Human Development in the Family Context 3
FHS 330 Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts 4
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 491 Junior Professional Practices and Issues I 3
 Credits 13
Winter
FHS 331 Group and Community Interventions 3
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 420 Research in Human Services 3
FHS 492 Contemporary Issues in Public Health 3
 Credits 12
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 493
Child and Family Case Management
or Adolescent and Adult Case Management
3
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement (American cultures or international cultures) 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 14
 Total Credits 39
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 496 Senior Project Proposal 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
Elective course 3
 Credits 15
Winter
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 495 Senior Professional Practices and Issues 3
Elective courses 8
Complete application for graduation on DuckWeb  
 Credits 14
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
 Credits 11
 Total Credits 40

Bachelor of Science in Family and Human Services

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Mathematics course 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement (American cultures or international cultures) 4
Prepare application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Winter
Mathematics course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
Submit application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Spring
Mathematics course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Complete all specified family and human services major admission requirements  
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 328 Human Development in the Family Context 3
FHS 330 Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts 4
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 491 Junior Professional Practices and Issues I 3
 Credits 13
Winter
FHS 331 Group and Community Interventions 3
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 420 Research in Human Services 3
FHS 492 Contemporary Issues in Public Health 3
 Credits 12
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 493
Child and Family Case Management
or Adolescent and Adult Case Management
3
Elective courses 8
 Credits 14
 Total Credits 39
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 496 Senior Project Proposal 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 495 Senior Professional Practices and Issues 3
Elective courses 8
Complete Application for Graduation on DuckWeb  
 Credits 14
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
 Credits 11
 Total Credits 41

Bachelor of Education in Family and Human Services

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
FHS 213
Issues for Children and Families
or Exploring Family and Human Services
or Diversity in Human Services
4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
Prepare application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Winter
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
Submit application for admission to the family and human services major  
 Credits 16
Spring
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective courses 8
Complete all specified family and human services major admission requirements  
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 328 Human Development in the Family Context 3
FHS 330 Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts 4
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 491 Junior Professional Practices and Issues I 3
 Credits 13
Winter
FHS 331 Group and Community Interventions 3
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 420 Research in Human Services 3
FHS 492 Contemporary Issues in Public Health 3
 Credits 12
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 493
Child and Family Case Management
or Adolescent and Adult Case Management
3
Elective courses 8
 Credits 14
 Total Credits 39
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 496 Senior Project Proposal 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
FHS 495 Senior Professional Practices and Issues 3
Elective courses 8
Complete application for graduation on DuckWeb  
 Credits 14
Spring
FHS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] 2
FHS 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1
Upper-division elective courses 8
 Credits 11
 Total Credits 41

Graduate Studies

The department offers master’s degrees with majors in counseling, family, and human services, couples and family therapy, and prevention science. The department also offers doctoral degrees with majors in counseling psychology and prevention science. The department’s faculty also provides courses for other College of Education and university programs.

Master’s Degrees in Counseling Psychology

The counseling psychology major leads to a master of arts (MA) and master of science (MS) degree awarded to doctoral students on their path to completing the doctoral degree. The program does not accept independent masters’ students. 

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114
Additional Requirement

The candidate must demonstrate proficiency in a second language.

Master of Science Degree Requirements

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114

The MA and MS degrees are earned by enrolled doctoral candidates who meet the requirements as they complete a PhD degree. Some graduate courses taken at another accredited institution may be applied to the requirements.

Master of Education in Counseling, Family, and Human Services

The counseling psychology major leads to a master of education (MEd) degree awarded to doctoral students on their path to completing the doctoral degree. The program does not accept independent masters’ students.

Master of Education Degree Requirements

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114
 
 

Couples and Family Therapy

Jeff Todahl, Program Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-0909
cft@uoregon.edu

This two-year program trains students as professional family therapists in preparation for state licensure. This intensive training combines a strong theoretical base in systemic therapy with applied clinical experience. Students learn how to provide culturally sensitive and responsive therapeutic services and collaborate with providers from other disciplines across a variety of health-care settings.

The clinical practicum includes 500 client contact hours with 200 hours in relational systems (50 percent with couples or families) and 80 hours of individual and group supervision. Supervision at the Center for Healthy Relationships involves live observation, participation in reflecting teams, and feedback on audiovisual recordings of therapy sessions. In addition, students see clients at community agencies, clinics, and therapist practices. The Couples and Family Therapy Program is one of two programs in Oregon to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education and approved by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists. Students of the program also have the option to complete a research project and formal thesis as well as the Spanish language specialization in addition to the standard program of courses.

Application and Admission

Detailed admission policies and procedures for the couples and family therapy specialization are available on the couples and family therapy website. Students are admitted fall term only. Completed applications must be received by the deadline published on the website for the following fall term. Only completed applications are reviewed for admission. Applicants are evaluated on the following:

  1. Quality of work
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or Millers Analogies Test (MAT) scores
  3. Related work, background, or experience
  4. Résumé with statement of purpose
  5. Diversity essay response
  6. Three letters of recommendation
  7. An interview

Notices about disposition of applications are mailed by April 15.

Applicants must pass a criminal background check before they may enroll.

Theoretical foundations19
Individual and family development25
Research competencies4
Professional ethics4
Clinical practice28
Additional courses10
Total Credits90

Doctoral Degree in Counseling Psychology

Benedict T. McWhirter, Program Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-9148
cpsy@uoregon.edu

The doctoral program is the only counseling psychology program in the Pacific Northwest that is accredited by the American Psychological Association Commission on Accreditation (750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242, 202-336-5979), and it is recognized as acceptable for licensure by the Oregon Board of Psychologist Examiners. The program has been accredited since 1955.

Earning a doctoral degree in counseling psychology typically requires five to six years of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. This period includes a one-year, full-time, supervised predoctoral internship. Students must complete a PhD dissertation that demonstrates a high standard of scholarship and the ability to conduct independent, original research. Students may enter the program with a bachelor’s or a master’s degree.

The program follows an ecological model of training embedded in the scientist-practitioner tradition. Students learn to use evidence-based preventive and remedial intervention strategies for working with individuals, children, families, and groups within their many contexts. This includes training in culturally sensitive assessment and intervention strategies designed to increase understanding and effect change at all levels. Students engage in critical reflection on the science and practice of health service psychology and social justice advocacy as core to their training.

The doctoral program prepares health service psychologists specializing in counseling psychology who can make a significant contribution to the field through scholarly research and professional practice. Students participate in integrated classroom, practicum, and fieldwork activities in research, prevention, and intervention with children and adults, families, groups, and communities. Training experience may be had at the UO Counseling Center, Oregon State University Counseling and Psychological Services, Lane Community College Counseling Department, UO Prevention Science Institute, and in community agencies or nonprofit research centers.

Graduates are prepared to work as researchers, practitioners, and educators in research institutions, institutions of higher education, medical settings, managed and integrated health-care organizations, community college and university counseling centers, community mental health centers, juvenile corrections agencies, human resources departments in business, and career counseling agencies.

PhD Requirements

Courses in psychological foundations and discipline-specific knowledge24
Courses in research methods, design, statistics, and measurement48
Dissertation18
Dissertation
Practitioner competencies57
Professional competencies12
Additional courses6
Total Credits165

Application and Admission

Students are admitted fall term only. Prospective applicants may find detailed admission policies and procedures on the counseling psychology website. The closing date for receipt of completed applications is posted on the website for entry the following fall term. Notices about the disposition of applications are e-mailed by April 15.

Applicants are evaluated on the following:

  1. Academic record
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores
  3. Related work, research, and life experiences
  4. Statement of purpose in seeking admission
  5. Letters of recommendation
  6. An interview

Only completed applications are reviewed. The application process is online only; see the website for procedures.

Graduate training includes research training, completion of a predissertation research project, and completion of a dissertation as well as practicum and internship placements in which students work with children and adults, families, groups, and communities.

Doctoral Degree in Prevention Science

Nicole Giuliani and Nichole KellyProgram Directors
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-9148
prevsci@uoregon.edu

The doctoral program leads to a doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in prevention science. This research-intensive degree program can be completed in four years, with students earning an MS en route to the PhD. This program is intended for students who have completed a bachelor’s or master’s degree in a prevention science–related discipline or have significant human development, psychology, social science, education, or prevention science experience. Students must complete a PhD dissertation that demonstrates a high standard of scholarship and the ability to conduct independent, original research.

Program Goals and Competencies

Goals
  • Goal 1. Graduates describe theoretical models, risk and protective factors, preventive interventions (especially evidence-based ones), and implementation practices related to prevention programs and policies for diverse populations
  • Goal 2. Graduates understand and adhere to the standards of knowledge for prevention science, including best practices in research design and methods, data analysis, interpretation, dissemination and rigorous ethical practice
  • Goal 3. Graduates commit to multicultural competence and enhancing human welfare in their scholarly work related to prevention science
  • Goal 4. Graduates display professionalism in their relationships with faculty and staff members, peers, and community partners in diverse settings
Competencies

Learning objectives for the prevention science graduate programs focus on preparing students to achieve the following set of minimum competencies that accompany the stated program goals:

  • Competency 1. Students describe the origins, foundations, and standards of prevention science (Goal 2)
  • Competency 2. Students design and carry out theoretically grounded research studies that contribute to the literature on risk and protective factors, and identify their mechanisms of influence associated with behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan (Goal 1, 2, 3)
  • Competency 3. Students demonstrate knowledge of evidence-based preventive interventions and policies and understand how to apply prevention science theories to the design, implementation, and evaluation of preventive interventions (Goal 1, 2, 3, 4)
  • Competency 4. Students integrate knowledge of research design, quantitative methods, data analysis, and multimethod, multiagent assessment methods commonly used in prevention science into their research activities (Goal 2)
  • Competency 5. Students demonstrate skill in disseminating their work to diverse audiences via formal academic presentations, instructional activities, and professional or academic writing (Goal 1, 2, 3, 4)
  • Competency 6. Students demonstrate awareness and understanding of diversity and contextual issues such as culture, identity, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability, marginalization, poverty, inequality, and religion in their research, applied activities, and professional behavior (Goal 1, 3, 4)
  • Competency 7. Students indicate a commitment to continuous learning and professional development by establishing and maintaining effective professional relationships with faculty members, research and teaching supervisors, collaborators, participants, agency personnel, peers, and staff, and being responsive to constructive feedback (Goal 4)
  • Competency 8. Students demonstrate honesty, personal responsibility, and knowledge and appropriate application of relevant ethical and legal codes related to prevention science (e.g.,  American Psychological Association ethical standards) (Goal 4)

The course work lays a solid foundation for students interested in careers in academia or local, state, or national prevention and public health agencies.

PhD Requirements

Nine courses in psychological foundations 30
Eight courses in doctoral-level research methods and statistics32
Research4
Specialty area courses9
Dissertation course18
Research seminar8
Grant-writing course3
Supervised college teaching course1
Total Credits105

Application and Admission

Students are admitted fall term only. Prospective applicants may find detailed admission policies and procedures on the prevention science website. The closing date for receipt of completed applications is posted on the website for entry the following fall term. 

Applicants are evaluated on the following:

  1. Academic record
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores
  3. Prevention-related research and work experiences
  4. Statement of purpose in seeking admission
  5. Letters of recommendation
  6. Interview—in-person, telephone, or video—with a member of the program faculty

Only completed applications are reviewed. Applicants must gather the requested supporting papers and submit them with the application forms as one package. Graduate training includes completion of a research paper and a dissertation.

Specialization in Spanish Language Psychological Service and Research

Ellen McWhirter, Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-9148
slpsr@uoregon.edu

The 16-credit Spanish language psychological service and research specialization addresses the deficit in family-centered prevention services for the Spanish-speaking Latino community. It is open to students enrolled in the accredited graduate programs of counseling psychology, couples and family therapy, and school psychology who also meet the eligibility criteria. The specialization provides students with skills to support the provision of culturally relevant mental health services and research in Spanish for Latino populations. It is designed to enhance preexisting linguistic and multicultural competencies and increase cultural understanding of US Spanish-speaking populations. Students critically assess the unique social, historical, political, and cultural contexts that shape the experiences of Latinos in the United States, with particular attention to conditions of social injustice and inequity, and how such conditions influence the health and well-being of Latino Spanish-speaking communities.

Eligibility for this specialization includes maintaining good standing in one of the three specified College of Education graduate programs focused on mental health services, approval from the student's advisor and the director of the specialization, and preexisting competencies in Spanish. 

Requirements

CPSY 612Professional Ethics3
CPSY 615Counseling Diverse Populations3
CPSY 626 Psychological Services for Latinos
CPSY 508Workshop: [Topic] (Topics in Latino Mental Health)3
CPSY 609Practicum: [Topic] (three terms)3
CPSY 609Practicum: [Topic] 11
or CFT 609 Practicum: [Topic]
or SPSY 609 Practicum: [Topic]
Total Credits13
Additional Requirements
Students must participate in 20 hours (minimum) of continuous learning experiences and educational-cultural events, complete a capstone project, and maintain good standing in the departmental graduate program.
 

Counseling Psychology Courses

Course usage information

CPSY 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 217. Foundations of Student Health and Well-Being. 3 Credits.

This course examines risk and protective factors for college students and reviews educational and behavioral strategies for reducing personal risk and enhancing well-being, with focus on topics including stress, physical health, healthy sexuality, sexual violence prevention, substance use, social media use, and being allies.

Course usage information

CPSY 401. Research. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 417. Introduction to Counseling Psychology Profession. 2 Credits.

An examination of counseling psychology as a specialty that emphasizes multicultural approaches to serving individuals, families, and groups through clinical practice and research.

Course usage information

CPSY 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 611. Counseling Skills. 2,3 Credits.

Emphasizes experiential learning of a broad range of communication skills needed to form effective helping relationships. Covers client intake procedures and interviewing strategies. Includes laboratory. Prereq for nonmajors; instructor's consent.

Course usage information

CPSY 612. Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

Ethical and legal concerns in the professional practice of psychology. Ethical theory and decision-making processes; legal aspects of client-psychologist relationships.

Course usage information

CPSY 613. Introduction to Counseling Psychology. 3 Credits.

Historical foundations of counseling psychology. Major theories and theorists. Counseling as an ecological and context-sensitive interactive process. Settings and roles of the profession.

Course usage information

CPSY 614. Theories of Counseling. 3 Credits.

Overview of selected historical and current counseling theories.

Course usage information

CPSY 615. Counseling Diverse Populations. 3 Credits.

Influence of gender, race, ethnicity, and other factors related to diverse populations on the identity-formation process in contemporary society. Applications to counseling psychology.

Course usage information

CPSY 617. Theories of Career Development. 3 Credits.

Addresses life-span career development including issues, concepts, and definitions; theories of career development and choice; intervention in strategies; and career resources in the context of a multicultural society.

Course usage information

CPSY 621. Lifespan Developmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Understanding continuity and change in human development and the ways in which the development of children, adolescents, and adults can be enhanced. Repeatable once for a maximum of 6 credits.

Course usage information

CPSY 622. Psychological Assessment II. 4 Credits.

Selection and administration of instruments and procedures for generating personality and career assessment reports. Emphasizes the integration of assessment into the intervention planning process. Includes laboratory.

Course usage information

CPSY 635. Social Aspects of Behavior. 4-5 Credits.

This course introduces research and concepts related to social influences on human behavior, including prejudice, conformity, aggression, prosocial behavior, internalized social norms, and social cognition.

Course usage information

CPSY 642. Child-Family Interventions. 4 Credits.

Empirically oriented interventions with children and families, ranging from early childhood through adolescence. Integrates developmental and intervention sciences.

Course usage information

CPSY 645. Health Promotion and Equity. 3 Credits.

This course introduces theoretical and empirical work in prevention-focused health psychology, integrating cultural, developmental, and community psychology concepts as they pertain to health related behaviors.

Course usage information

CPSY 651. Advanced Individual Counseling Intervention. 3 Credits.

Focuses on applying interpersonal process and problem-management approaches to individual counseling and psychotherapy; using assessment information in treatment planning.

Course usage information

CPSY 654. Supervision and Consultation. 4 Credits.

Focuses on didactic knowledge of supervision theory, research, models of practice, and evidence-based practices in supervision and consultation and acquisition of supervision and consultation skills. Students refine their knowledge of supervision theory, research, and techniques and integrate these into supervision and consultation activities.

Course usage information

CPSY 704. Internship: [Topic]. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 706. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 708. Special Topics: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Couples and Family Therapy Courses

Course usage information

CFT 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

A current topic is Methods.

Course usage information

CFT 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 612. Parenting Interventions. 3 Credits.

Examines evidence-based practices for parenting children and adolescents, including trauma-focused parenting strategies.

Course usage information

CFT 614. Child Mental Health and Diagnosis. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes the etiology, nosology, phenomenology, and diagnosis of mental health disorders in children. Examines social and cultural assumptions about "normal"versus "pathological" behavior, cognition, and emotion.

Course usage information

CFT 615. Introduction to Marriage Family Therapy. 3 Credits.

Surveys the distinct disciplines of marriage and family therapy.

Course usage information

CFT 616. Systems Theory Foundations. 3 Credits.

Surveys macro theories and their relationship to families and family therapy with emphasis on systems, communications, and ecological theories.

Course usage information

CFT 620. Mental Health and Diagnosis. 3 Credits.

Study of maladaptive behavior, treatment, and prevention emphasizing the integrative contributions of biological, behavior, cognitive, psychodynamic, humanist-existential, and community perspectives, including the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders."

Course usage information

CFT 621. Ethics Discussion. 1 Credit.

Provides an opportunity to more fully examine and discuss ethical and legal considerations for couples and family therapists with emphasis on relational-systemic elements of ethical decision-making.

Course usage information

CFT 622. Relational Assessment. 1 Credit.

Examines evidence-based practices for assessment in couples therapy. Integrates systems and communication theory with emerging contextual and behavior-assessment models.

Course usage information

CFT 624. Group Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Presents basic elements of group process; includes introduction to group work, guidelines for multicultural practice, ethical and professional issues in group practice, and group leadership.

Course usage information

CFT 625. Violence, Trauma, and Healing. 4 Credits.

Theories and research on the acceleration and cessation of violence in the family and assessment of responses to violent family behaviors and to perpetrators, survivors, and families.

Course usage information

CFT 626. Relational Sex Therapy. 3 Credits.

Increases understanding and clinical abilities for working with couples; special emphasis on the role of intimacy and sexual relationships.

Course usage information

CFT 627. Advanced Theories in Relational Therapy. 4 Credits.

Studies theories and models of couples and family therapy; self-evaluation of clinical work. Examines integration, specifically the "metaframeworks" model,solution-focused therapy, and emotionally focused therapy.

Course usage information

CFT 628. Addiction and Recovery. 4 Credits.

Increases the conceptual understanding and skills of family therapists working with contemporary issues; emphasis on addictions and addiction recovery.

Course usage information

CFT 629. Intimate Partner Therapy. 4 Credits.

Application of systems theory to problems within relationships and their resolution. Includes research findings, assessment, motivation, change, content and process, ethics, and social-macro considerations.

Course usage information

CFT 630. Wellness and Spirituality. 3 Credits.

Provides an understanding of existential issues, spirituality, and wellness. Working with clients' life-cycle stages and health-stress issues; resources to promote wellness.

Course usage information

CFT 632. Medical Family Therapy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the theory, fundamentals, and practical applications of medical family therapy.

Family and Human Services Courses

Course usage information

FHS 199. . 1-5 Credits.

Course usage information

FHS 213. Issues for Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Examines issues and problems confronting children and families in the United States. Issues such as disability, poverty, health care, addictions, racism, and violence are addressed.

Course usage information

FHS 215. Exploring Family and Human Services. 3 Credits.

Explores the historic basis and current design of family and human services. Emphasizes services to children, youth, adults, and families.
Prereq: FHS 213 is prereq or co-req.

Course usage information

FHS 216. Diversity in Human Services. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the foundational knowledge, awareness, and skills needed for working with diverse populations in the human services. This course will explore issues of equity and inclusion across the levels of the ecological model.

Course usage information

FHS 301. Writing for Human Services Professionals. 3 Credits.

This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills necessary for writing competently for professional/scientific audiences through a series of assigned readings, in- and out-of-class assignments, and quizzes. Students will practice iterative writing by giving and receiving peer reviews and incorporating peer and instructor feedback.
Prereq: WR 121 is prereq or co-req.

Course usage information

FHS 328. Human Development in the Family Context. 3 Credits.

Examines human development within the context of the family from an evidence-based perspective. Integration of contemporary family issues experienced across the lifespan within the context of the human service profession.
Prereq: CPSY 217 (concurrent enrollment allowed), FHS 213, FHS 216, FHS 301.

Course usage information

FHS 329. Youth Psychopathology in Context. 4 Credits.

Presents child and adolescent psychopathology and problems within a diagnostic framework. Topics address psychosocial issues for youth in family and cultural contexts.

Course usage information

FHS 330. Individual Interventions in Ecological Contexts. 4 Credits.

Introduces the concept of individual interventions within an ecological model. Provides knowledge and development of basic listening skills and how to apply these skills to individuals in diverse contexts.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 331. Group and Community Interventions. 3 Credits.

Introduces the concept of group intervention within the context of group theory and community development. Provides knowledge and development of group interventions, including group facilitation skills and curriculum development.
Prereq: FHS 330.

Course usage information

FHS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 404. . 1-12 Credits.

Course usage information

FHS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 420. Research in Human Services. 3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to research methods commonly used in human services, prevention science, and social work. Students will learn how to formulate research questions; identify, interpret, and evaluate empirical research articles; and engage in scientific writing by preparing research reports.
Prereq: FHS 213, FHS 216, FHS 301.

Course usage information

FHS 422. Prevention Science in Practice. 2-5 Credits.

Prevention science focused experiential learning within a research center or community agency. Co-enrollment in FHS 423 required. Repeatable four times for a total of 10 credits.
Prereq: FHS 471.

Course usage information

FHS 423. Prevention Science in Practice Supervision. 1 Credit.

Seminar providing group supervision related to field studies participation within a local school or community agency. Repeatable 11 times for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

FHS 471. Human Services Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on professional ethics relevant to human services practitioners, with an emphasis on building skills required for ethical decision-making, including self-awareness, identification and integration of personal, professional, and legal values and standards, and evaluating scientific literature on prevention and intervention.
Prereq: FHS 420; pre or coreq: FHS 330.

Course usage information

FHS 472. Human Services in Practice. 2-5 Credits.

Supervised practicum (internship) within a local school or community agency. Co-enrollment in FHS 473 required. Repeatable eight times for a total of 18 credits.
Prereq: FHS 471.

Course usage information

FHS 473. Human Services in Practice Supervision. 1 Credit.

Seminar providing group supervision related to practicum (internship) participation within a local school or community agency. Repeatable 11 times for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

FHS 482. Prevention of Youth Violence. 4 Credits.

Research and practice in community interventions designed to prevent youth violence. Includes home, school, and community-based interventions.

Course usage information

FHS 483. Prevention of Interpersonal Violence. 4 Credits.

Examines interpersonal violence and community-based prevention using ecological, multicultural, international frameworks. Emphasizes assessment, prevention, intervention, and simultaneous occurrence of adult violence and child maltreatment.

Course usage information

FHS 490. Scientific Analysis in Human Services. 3 Credits.

This course instills students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand and perform basic quantitative and qualitative data analysis and to understand and demonstrate how data analysis is related to research design within the context of prevention science and the human services, broadly.

Course usage information

FHS 491. Junior Professional Practices and Issues I. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional. Includes ethical standards for professional practice.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 492. Contemporary Issues in Public Health. 3 Credits.

This course covers methods for assessing and addressing community health problems and promoting health equity.
Prereq: FHS 213, FHS 216, FHS 301.

Course usage information

FHS 493. Child and Family Case Management. 3 Credits.

This class provides students skills in case management and human-service-focused direct practice with children, adolescents, and families, including needs assessments, case conceptualization, service plan development, and direct service intervention.
Prereq: FHS 331.

Course usage information

FHS 494. Adolescent and Adult Case Management. 3 Credits.

This class provides students skills in case management and human service focused direct practice with adolescents and adults, including needs assessments, case conceptualization, service plan development, and direct service intervention.
Prereq: FHS 331.

Course usage information

FHS 495. Senior Professional Practices and Issues. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 496. Senior Project Proposal. 1 Credit.

Students create a written proposal outlining rationale, project description, and timelines for completing the senior project.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 582. Prevention of Youth Violence. 4 Credits.

Research and practice in community interventions designed to prevent youth violence. Includes home, school, and community-based interventions.

Course usage information

FHS 583. Prevention of Interpersonal Violence. 4 Credits.

Examines interpersonal violence and community-based prevention using ecological, multicultural, international frameworks. Emphasizes assessment, prevention, intervention, and simultaneous occurrence of adult violence and child maltreatment.

Prevention Science Courses

Course usage information

PREV 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable up to 4 times.

Course usage information

PREV 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable up to four times for a total of five credits.

Course usage information

PREV 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable up to four times for a total of five credits.

Course usage information

PREV 631. Introduction to Prevention Science. 3 Credits.

Overview of theory, research, and practice in prevention science and health promotion, including foundational concepts, translation of theory into intervention, methodology, and implementation.

Course usage information

PREV 632. Risk and Resilience in Adolescents. 3 Credits.

Research and theory related to risk and resiliency processes during adolescence and young adulthood. Focuses on populations at elevated risk for adverse outcomes.

Course usage information

PREV 633. Contemporary Issues in Public Health. 3 Credits.

This course introduces approaches, concepts, methods, and perspectives of epidemiology as applied to current public health issues and prevention science research and practice.

Course usage information

PREV 634. Implementation Science. 3 Credits.

Provides a framework for examining implementation science and its application to clinical and community-based research.

Course usage information

PREV 635. Prevention and Policy. 3 Credits.

Provide students with an understanding of how basic science is translated into evidence-based prevention programs and policy.

Course usage information

PREV 641. Meta-Analysis II. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of advanced meta-analytic statistical techniques. During this course, students will learn about a range of advanced meta-analytic techniques, including those used to explain heterogeneity, handle complex data structures, and address questions about comparative intervention effectiveness.
Prereq: PREV 640