Management

https://business.uoregon.edu/departments/management

Anne Parmigiani, Department Head
Undergraduate Advising Office
203 Peterson Hall

Department of Management courses prepare students for the challenges of managerial responsibility in private and public organizations. They are useful for students who want to develop general management skills that can be applied in a variety of contexts, ranging from new business startups to global businesses. Management courses also serve students who are concentrating in other areas of business and who recognize the importance of developing management and leadership skills to enhance their chances for career advancement. Courses focus on such critical management and leadership skills as launching new business ventures, negotiation and conflict resolution, managing in dynamic and changing environments, and international management.

The entrepreneurship concentration prepares students for careers in entrepreneurially driven firms. Examples include new and rapidly growing firms, technology-oriented firms, and family businesses. Special attention is given to venture creation, the unique problems encountered by firms that are growing, and the way sound business principles and strategies can be adapted to fit this environment.

Faculty

Eric Boggs, instructor; director, honors program. BA, 2001, Lewis and Clark College; MA, 2010, Pacific; MS, 2011, Oregon. (2017)

Ryan Cabinte, instructor. BA, 1996, Yale; JD, 2001, Boston; MBA, 2010, Presidio Graduate School. (2017)

Neil Chinn, instructor (communications and leadership, business strategy, human resource management). BA, 1973, Leicester; certificate of higher education, 1974, Loughborough; MS, 1979, MBA, 1992, Oregon. (2013)

Allan G. Cochrane, instructor (entrepreneurship, venture planning, leadership development). BS, 1970, Roberts Wesleyan. (2008)

Michael Crooke, Avamere Professor of Practice. BS, MBA, Humboldt State; PhD, 2008, Claremont Graduate. (2012)

Thomas L. Durant, senior instructor (global business management; market, product, and technology development). BS, 1972, MBA, 1974, Southern California; MA, 2006, George Fox Evangelical Seminary. (2010)

David Dusseau, senior instructor. BS, 1975, Ohio State; MBA, 1985, PhD, 1992, Oregon. (1984)

David Garten, instructor. BS, 1982, Trinity College; MS, 1984, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; MBA, 1987, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2009)

Kate A. Harmon, instructor (entrepreneurship, venture planning); undergraduate program manager, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship. BFA, BA, 1993, MFA, 1997, Ohio. (2015)

Ralph A. Heidl, associate professor (collaborative networks, innovation management). MS, 1994, MS, 2000, Pennsylvania State; PhD, 2010, Washington (Seattle). (2015)

Elizabeth Hjelm, senior instructor, Edwin E. and June Woldt Cone Professor of Marketing (benchmarking and best practice, financial process analysis and redesign). BA, 1980, Notre Dame; MMgmt, 1982, Northwestern. (2003)

Charles Kalnbach, senior instructor (generations in the workplace, Myers-Briggs type indicator). BA, 1991, Thomas Edison State; MS, 1995, Indiana, Bloomington; EdD, 2008, Nova Southeastern. (2003)

Lauren Lanahan, assistant professor (innovation, business policy, entrepreneurship). BA, 2006, Reed College; MA, 2013, PhD, 2015, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (2015)

Nathan Lillegard, instructor (early-stage finance and operations, new venture development); program manager, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship. BA, 1998, MBA, 2006, Oregon. (2012)

Reut Livne-Tarandach, assistant professor (compassion, organizational change processes, creativity). BA, 2000, Ben-Gurion; MSc, 2004, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology; PhD, 2012, Boston College. (2012)

Izabel Loinaz, instructor (greening sports and events); director, Center for Sustainable Business Practices. BA, 1997, San Francisco State; MBA, 2012, Presidio Graduate School. (2015)

Farhad Malekafzali, instructor. PhD, 1994, Wisconsin-Madison. (2012)

Mohan Nair, instructor. BS, 1980, MS, 1982, Oregon. (2015)

Andrew Joel Nelson, associate professor (commercialization of university research, diffusion networks and network analysis); Randall C. Papé Chair in Entrepreneurship and Innovation; academic director, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship; associate vice president, entrepreneurship and innovation. BA, 1998, Stanford; MSc, 2000, Oxford; PhD, 2007, Stanford. (2008)

Anne Parmigiani, Tykeson Professor (firm capabilities, interfirm relationships). BS, 1987, MBA, 1996, Pennsylvania State; PhD, 2003, Michigan, Ann Arbor. (2004)

David Preston, instructor. BA, 1977, Kalamazoo College; MBA, 1983, Chicago; PhD, 1997, Oregon. (2013)

Michael V. Russo, professor (corporate policy and strategy, environmental management); academic director, Center for Sustainable Business Practices. BS, 1979, Columbia; MS, 1980, Stanford; MBA, 1986, PhD, 1989, California, Berkeley. (1989)

Ronald Severson, senior instructor (cross-cultural negotiation, cultural studies). BA, 1979, Willamette; MA, 1987, Oregon; PhD, 1999, Utah. (1996)

Joshua Skov, instructor (life-cycle assessment, clean energy finance, carbon accounting). BA, 1992, Yale; MA, 1994, Washington (Seattle); MA, 1997, California, Berkeley. (2009)

William H. Starbuck, courtesy professor in residence (decision-making, organizational learning). AB, 1956, Harvard; MS, 1959, PhD, 1964, Carnegie Institute of Technology. (2005)

Tina Starr, senior instructor (business management, expatriates). BSc, 2000, Derby; MSc, 2001, PhD, 2006, Nottingham. (2011)

Jeffrey J. Stolle, senior instructor (ethics, critical thinking). BA, 1990, St. Thomas (Minnesota); MA, 1994, Vanderbilt; PhD, 2001, Oregon. (2007)

David T. Wagner, associate professor (mood and emotion, sleep and work); coordinator, doctoral program. BS, 2002, MAcc, 2004, Brigham Young; PhD, 2009, Michigan State. (2014)

Ed Warnock, instructor. BS, 1968, Arizona; MA, 1993, Antioch. (2011)

Nicole L. Wilson, instructor (personality, individual differences, self-regulation). BA, 1999, MS, 2001, Oregon; PhD, 2008, Washington (Seattle). (2015)

Peter A. Younkin, assistant professor. BA, 1999, Columbia; PhD, 2010, California, Berkeley. (2018)

Kate P. Zipay, assistant professor. BS, 2008, Florida State; MAcc, 2009, South Florida; PhD, 2018, Georgia. (2018)

Emeriti

Warren B. Brown, professor emeritus. BS, 1955, Colorado; MS, 1957, Stanford; MS, 1959, PhD, 1962, Carnegie-Mellon. (1967)

Alan Downing Meyer, professor emeritus. BA, 1968, MBA, 1970, Washington (Seattle); PhD, 1978, California, Berkeley. (2009)

Peter K. Mills, professor emeritus. BS, 1970, MBA, 1971, California State, Long Beach; PhD, 1978, Stockholm; PhD, 1980, California, Irvine. (1995)

Richard T. Mowday, professor emeritus. BS, 1970, San Jose; MS, 1972, PhD, 1975, California, Irvine. (1977)

Richard M. Steers, professor emeritus. BA, 1967, Whittier; MBA, 1968, Southern California; PhD, 1973, California, Irvine. (1975)

James R. Terborg, professor emeritus; James H. Warsaw Academic Director, James H. Warsaw Sports Marketing Center. BA, 1970, Calvin; MS, 1972, Eastern Michigan; PhD, 1975, Purdue. (1980)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BA 101 Introduction to Business 4
BA 199 Special Studies: [Topic] Attend study abroad1
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
TLC 199 Special Studies: [Topic] (Study Skills Workshop) 1
First term of first-year second-language sequence 5
Review the holistic requirements for admission to the major and establish a plan for developing these traits  
 Credits 15
Winter
EC 201 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics Get involved in a club4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence Use Career Services5
MATH 241 Calculus for Business and Social Science I 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
Meet with a Lundquist Academic advisor to make a long-term plan  
 Credits 17
Spring
EC 202 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence Consider the job shadow program5
MATH 242 Calculus for Business and Social Science II 4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
Attend the spring career fair4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 49
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ACTG 211 Introduction to Accounting I 4
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics Leadership role in club4
First term of second-year second-language sequence Learn Duck Connect4-5
Social science course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Meet an advisor regarding progress toward admission  
 Credits 16-17
Winter
ACTG 213 Introduction to Accounting II Prepare major application4
Arts and letters course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence Complete a practice interview4-5
General education course in science 4
See Lundquist Peer Educator about informational interviews  
 Credits 16-17
Spring
BA 240 Spreadsheet Analysis and Visualization 4
General education courses in arts and letters 8
Third term of second-year second-language sequence Conduct informational interviews4-5
Apply for business administration major within the first week of the term you are completing business premajor requirements  
 Credits 16-17
 Total Credits 48-51
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FIN 311 Economic Foundations of Competitive Analysis Explore concentrations4
OBA 311 Business Analytics I 4
BA 308 Leadership and Communication 4
 Credits 12
Winter
FIN 316 Financial Management Attend career fairs4
MKTG 311 Marketing Management 4
General education course in arts and letters 4
MGMT 311 Managing People in Organizations 4
 Credits 16
Spring
OBA 335 Operations Management 4
Upper-division business elective courses 8
OBA 312 Business Analytics II 4
Meet with Lundquist advisor to revise long-term plan to meet academic goals and strategize how to strengthen weak areas for career goals  
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 44
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BA 325 Business Law and Ethics 4
Upper-division business elective courses 8
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
BA 453 Business Strategy and Planning Apply for graduation4
Upper-division business elective courses 8
 Credits 12
Spring
Upper-division business elective courses Register for commencement8
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 40

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BA 101 Introduction to Business 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
BA 199 Special Studies: [Topic] 1
Arts and letters course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
General education course in social science 4
Review the holistic requirements for admission to the major and establish a plan for developing these traits  
 Credits 17
Winter
EC 201 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics Use Career Services4
MATH 241 Calculus for Business and Social Science I 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
General education course in arts and letters 4
Meet a Lundquist Academic advisor to make a long-term plan  
 Credits 16
Spring
EC 202 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics Consider the job shadow program4
MATH 242 Calculus for Business and Social Science II Attend the spring career fair4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
Arts and letters course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement Access tutoring resources4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 49
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ACTG 211 Introduction to Accounting I 4
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics Leadership role in a club4
General education course in arts and letters with a global context Learn Duck Connect4
Course with global context subject matter 4
Meet an advisor regarding progress toward admission  
 Credits 16
Winter
ACTG 213 Introduction to Accounting II Prepare major application4
Elective course 4
General education courses in science Complete a practice interview8
Meet Lundquist Peer Educator about informational interviews  
 Credits 16
Spring
BA 240 Spreadsheet Analysis and Visualization Conduct informational interviews4
Elective courses 8
General education course in science 4
Apply for business administration major within the first week of the term you are completing business premajor requirements  
Submit a Non-Business Breadth/Global Context proposal for approval  
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BA 308 Leadership and Communication 4
MGMT 311 Managing People in Organizations 4
OBA 312 Business Analytics II 4
 Credits 12
Winter
FIN 316 Financial Management Attend career fairs4
MKTG 311 Marketing Management Apply for internships4
OBA 335 Operations Management 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
FIN 311 Economic Foundations of Competitive Analysis Utilize networking events4
Upper-division business elective course 4
Elective course 4
OBA 311 Business Analytics I 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 44
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division business elective courses 12
BA 325 Business Law and Ethics 4
 Credits 16
Winter
BA 453 Business Strategy and Planning Apply for graduation4
Upper-division business elective course 4
Course with global context subject matter 4
 Credits 12
Spring
Upper-division business elective courses Register for commencement8
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 40

Courses

Course usage information

MGMT 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable when the topic changes.

Course usage information

MGMT 225. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 4 Credits.

Understanding of the historical and socio-economic context of entrepreneurship and how entrepreneurial ecosystems function and grow; fundamentals of entrepreneurship and business model development.

Course usage information

MGMT 250. Introduction to Sustainable Business. 4 Credits.

Examination of the challenges and opportunities that the sustainability imperative presents to business. Focus on discussion of specific cases and pertinent issues to promote learning.

Course usage information

MGMT 311. Managing People in Organizations. 4 Credits.

Students learn the theories, empirical evidence, and best practices for managing people at work. Students cannot receive credit for both MGMT 311 and MGMT 311H.
Prereq: MATH 241 and BA 308 or BA 308H.

Course usage information

MGMT 311H. Managing People in Organizations. 4 Credits.

Students learn the theories, empirical evidence, and best practices for managing people at work. Students cannot receive credit for both MGMT 311 and MGMT 311H. Sophomore standing required.
Prereq: MATH 241 and BA 308 or BA 308H.

Course usage information

MGMT 335. Launching New Ventures. 4 Credits.

Skills, behaviors, and knowledge necessary for creating and growing new ventures. Evaluating opportunities, developing growth strategies, obtaining venture financing, intellectual property, and building a management team.
Prereq: BA 101.

Course usage information

MGMT 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable when the topic changes. Recent topics include Strategic Environmental Management, Technology and Innovation Management.

Course usage information

MGMT 415. Human Resources Management. 4 Credits.

Management of employee relations by an organization. Hiring and developing a productive work force in the context of the legal and competitive environment.
Prereq: MGMT 321 or MGMT 311.

Course usage information

MGMT 416. Organizational Development and Change Management. 4 Credits.

Organizational leaders face an accelerating pace of change in information technology, markets, and consumers. Focuses on how leaders create and sustain these organizational changes.
Prereq: BA 352, MGMT 321 or MGMT 311.

Course usage information

MGMT 417. Negotiation Strategies. 4 Credits.

Introduction to negotiation theory, distributive and integrative bargaining techniques, and alternative dispute resolution. Uses workshop format for in-class negotiation simulations.
Prereq: MGMT 321 or MGMT 311.

Course usage information

MGMT 420. Managing in a Global Economy. 4 Credits.

Economic, political and cultural challenges facing international managers. Topics include developing competitive global strategies and organizations, international negotiations, building strategic alliances, cross-cultural teams, and international staffing.
Prereq: MGMT 321 or MGMT 311.

Course usage information

MGMT 422. Sustainable Business Strategy and Implementation. 4 Credits.

Focus on strategic choice and implementation of initiatives to promote sustainability in business organizations. Exposure to approaches for both established companies and new ventures.
Prereq: BA 101, MGMT 250 or MGMT 311.

Course usage information

MGMT 443. Life Cycle Assessment. 4 Credits.

Build foundations in technical sustainability analysis serving business strategy and operations. Learn tools and skills for firm- and product-level analysis.
Prereq: BA 101, MGMT 250.

Course usage information

MGMT 455. Implementing Entrepreneurial Strategies. 4 Credits.

Fundamentals of entrepreneurship are applied to solve actual problems for real companies. Students will gain a thorough understanding of project management processes (agile, lean six sigma, sprints, etc.) and learn how to effectively execute a project from inception to final deliverable.
Prereq: ACTG 340, MGMT 335, MKTG 445.

Course usage information

MGMT 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable when the topic changes. Recent topics include Strategic Environmental Management, Technology and Innovation Management.

Course usage information

MGMT 543. Life Cycle Assessment. 4 Credits.

Build foundations in technical sustainability analysis serving business strategy and operations. Learn tools and skills for firm- and product-level analysis.

Course usage information

MGMT 601. Research [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 608. Special Topics: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

MGMT 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable when the topic changes. A recent topic is Sustainable Business Development.

Course usage information

MGMT 612. Managing Individuals and Organizations. 3 Credits.

Design of high-performance organizations and internal systems. Analysis of team dynamics and group decision-making. Study of individual cognitive and leadership styles.

Course usage information

MGMT 614. Strategic Management. 3 Credits.

Analysis of industries and companies, development of competitive and cooperative strategies, analysis of the special demands of alternative social, technological, and international contexts.

Course usage information

MGMT 615. Leadership. 3 Credits.

Development of skills managers need to be effective leaders in organizations, including communicating, problem-solving, influencing, motivating, delegating, and resolving conflict.

Course usage information

MGMT 620. Managing Global Business. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the problems of operating across multiple political and cultural boundaries. Possible topics include corporate strategy, the role of multinational corporations, and international joint ventures.

Course usage information

MGMT 623. Negotiation. 3 Credits.

Negotiation theory including distributive and integrative bargaining techniques, economic complements, game theory, and alternative dispute resolution. Extensive in-class negotiation simulations.

Course usage information

MGMT 625. New Venture Planning. 3 Credits.

Students identify and research a business opportunity; develop and present a professional start-up business plan that includes market, competitor, cash flow, and financial analyses.

Course usage information

MGMT 635. Opportunity Recognition. 3 Credits.

Introduces the fundamentals of entrepreneurship, providing the tools necessary to successfully identify a true opportunity and to start and develop a new organization. Open only to MBA and MActg majors.

Course usage information

MGMT 640. Sustainable Business Development. 3 Credits.

Focuses on corporate environmental management, drawing on economic and policy models, strategic analysis, and use of business cases. Issues facing small and mid-sized companies stressed.

Course usage information

MGMT 641. Industrial Ecology. 3 Credits.

Takes a systems approach to the design and manufacture of products and delivery of services with minimized ecological impact.

Course usage information

MGMT 690. Management Proseminar. 1 Credit.

Contemporary issues in management research. Includes visiting speakers, resident faculty members, and doctoral students discussing their research.