Physics

http://physics.uoregon.edu

Richard P. Taylor, Department Head
541-346-4741
541-346-5861 fax
173 Willamette Hall
1274 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274

Physics, the most basic of the natural sciences, is concerned with the discovery and development of the laws that describe our physical universe. This endeavor serves, also, to directly benefit humankind: integrated circuits found in computers, mobile phones, and solar cells, lasers in DVD players and computer mice, and the Internet itself were developed from fundamental physics discoveries.

Faculty

Benjamín Alemán, assistant professor (experimental condensed matter, optical physics). BS, 2004, Oregon; MA, 2010, PhD, 2011, California, Berkeley. (2013)

David Allcock, assistant professor (ion trapping and quantum information). MS, 2007, PhD, 2012, Oxford. (2019)

Jayanth Banavar, professsor (statistical physics). BS, 1972, MS, 1974, Bangalore University, PhD, 1978, University of Pittsburgh. (2019)

Dietrich Belitz, professor (condensed matter theory). Dipl Phys, 1980, Dr.rer.nat., 1982, Technical University Munich. (1987)

Bryan S. Boggs, senior lecturer (optical physics). BS, 1995, MS, 1996, PhD, 2012, Oregon. (2013)

Gregory D. Bothun, professor (astronomy). BS, 1976, PhD, 1981, Washington (Seattle). (1990)

James E. Brau, Philip H. Knight Professor (experimental elementary particle physics). BS, 1969, United States Air Force Academy; MS, 1970, PhD, 1978, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (1988)

Spencer Chang, associate professor (theoretical high-energy physics). BS, 1999, Stanford; PhD, 2004, Harvard. (2010)

Timothy Cohen, assistant professor (elementary particle theory). BS, 2006, MS, 2009, PhD, 2011, Michigan, Ann Arbor. (2015)

Eric Corwin, associate professor (biophysics, soft condensed matter). BA, 2001, Harvard; PhD, 2007, Chicago. (2010)

Ben Farr, assistant professor (gravitational waves). BS, 2009, Rochester Institute of Technology; PhD, 2014, Northwestern. (2017)

R. Scott Fisher, senior lecturer (astronomy). BS, 1993, PhD, 2001, Florida. (2012)

Raymond E. Frey, professor (experimental elementary particle physics). BA, 1978, California, Irvine; MS, 1981, PhD, 1984, California, Riverside. (1989)

James N. Imamura, professor (astrophysics); director, Institute of Theoretical Science. BA, 1974, California, Irvine; MA, 1978, PhD, 1981, Indiana. (1985)

Laura Jeanty, assistant professor (high-energy physics). BS, 2006, Yale; MS, 2009, PhD, 2013, Harvard. (2018)

Elsa Johnson, instructor (astronomy). BS, 1993, Oregon State University, MS, 1999, California; Irvine, PhD, 2010, Oregon. (2010)

Stephen D. Kevan, professor (solid state physics). BA, 1976, Wesleyan; PhD, 1980, California, Berkeley. (1985)

Graham Kribs, professor (elementary particle theory). BASc, 1993, Toronto; PhD, 1998, Michigan, Ann Arbor. (2004)

Dean W. Livelybrooks, senior instructor (geophysics). BS, 1977, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; MS, 1984, PhD, 1990, Oregon. (1996)

Stephanie Majewski, associate professor (experimental elementary particle physics). BS, 2002, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; PhD, 2007, Stanford. (2012)

Benjamin McMorran, associate professor (experimental condensed matter, optical physics). BS, 2000, Oregon State; MS, PhD, 2009, Arizona. (2011)

Stanley J. Micklavzina, senior instructor (physics education). BS, 1982, MS, 1985, Oregon. (1985)

Jens Nöckel, associate professor (optical physics). Dipl. Phys., 1992, Hamburg; PhD, 1997, Yale. (2001)

Raghuveer Parthasarathy, Alec and Kay Keith Professor (condensed matter physics, biophysics). BA, 1997, California, Berkeley; PhD, 2002, Chicago. (2006)

Jayson Paulose, assistant professor (condensed matter theory). AB, 2007, Princeton; SM, 2009, PhD, 2013, Harvard. (2018)

Michael G. Raymer, Philip H. Knight Professor (quantum optics and optical physics). BA, 1974, California, Santa Cruz; PhD, 1979, Colorado. (1988)

William C. Scannell, lab instructor (physics education). BS, 2002, MS, 2004, PhD, 2010, Oregon. (2016)

James M. Schombert, Noble F. and Frances L. Miller Professor in Astrophysics (astronomy). BS, 1979, Maryland; MPhil, 1982, PhD, 1984, Yale. (1996)

Brian J. Smith, associate professor (quantum optics, optical physics). BA, 2000, Gustavus Adolphus College; PhD, 2007, Oregon. (2015)

Daniel Steck, associate professor (atom optics and nonlinear dynamics). BS, 1995, Dayton; PhD, 2001, Texas, Austin. (2004)

David M. Strom, professor (experimental elementary particle physics). BA, 1980, St. Olaf; PhD, 1986, Wisconsin, Madison. (1991)

Richard P. Taylor, professor (solid state physics). BS, 1985, PhD, 1988, Nottingham. CAD, 1995, Manchester School of Art; MA, 2000, New South Wales. (1999)

John J. Toner, professor (condensed matter theory). BS, 1977, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; MA, 1979, PhD, 1981, Harvard. (1995)

Eric Torrence, professor (experimental elementary particle physics). BS, 1990, Washington (Seattle); PhD, 1997, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2000)

Tristan S. Ursell, assistant professor (condensed matter physics, biophysics). BS, 2003, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; MS, 2003, PhD, 2009, California Institute of Technology. (2014)

Steven J. van Enk, professor (theoretical optical physics). MSc, 1988, Utrecht; PhD, 1992, Leiden. (2006)

Hailin Wang, professor (quantum optics); Alec and Kay Keith Chair. BS, 1982, Science and Technology (China); MS, 1986, PhD, 1990, Michigan. (1995)

David Wineland, research professor (atomic spectroscopy, quantum information, quantum-limited metrology). BA, 1965, California, Berkeley; MA, 1966, PhD, 1970, Harvard. (2018)

Tien-Tien Yu, assistant professor (high-energy physics). AB, 2007, Chicago; PhD, 2013, Wisconsin, Madison. (2017)

Research Faculty and Staff

Robert Schofield, senior research associate (nuclear biophysics). BS, 1982, Brigham Young; PhD, 1990, Oregon. (1993)

Nikolai Sinev, senior research associate (experimental high energy physics). BS, 1968, PhD, 1974, Moscow State. (1993)

Frank Vignola, senior research associate (solar energy). BA, 1967, California, Berkeley; MS, 1969, PhD, 1975, Oregon. (1977)

Emeriti

Paul L. Csonka, professor (elementary particle theory). PhD, 1963, Johns Hopkins. (1968)

Nilendra G. Deshpande, professor (elementary particle theory). BSc, 1959, MSc, 1960, Madras; PhD, 1965, Pennsylvania. (1975)

Rudolph C. Hwa, professor emeritus. BS, 1952, MS, 1953, PhD, 1957, Illinois; PhD, 1962, Brown. (1971)

Harlan Lefevre, professor emeritus. BA, 1951, Reed; PhD, 1961, Wisconsin. (1961)

Joel W. McClure Jr., professor emeritus. BS, 1949, MS, 1951, Northwestern; PhD, 1954, Chicago. (1954)

David K. McDaniels, professor emeritus. BS, 1951, Washington State; MS, 1958, PhD, 1960, Washington (Seattle). (1963)

John T. Moseley, professor emeritus. BS, 1964, MS, 1966, PhD, 1969, Georgia Institute of Technology. (1979)

George W. Rayfield, professor emeritus. BS, 1958, Stanford; PhD, 1964, California, Berkeley. (1967)

David R. Sokoloff, professor emeritus. BA, 1966, City University of New York, Queens; PhD, 1972, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (1978)

Robert L. Zimmerman, professor emeritus. BA, 1958, Oregon; PhD, 1963, Washington (Seattle). (1966)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

 

Undergraduate Studies

As it involves the development of analytical, technical, problem-solving, and science communication skills, a major in physics provides a good start for many career paths. In addition to major and minor programs, the Department of Physics offers a variety of courses for nonmajors and health science premajor students.

Preparation

Entering freshmen should have taken as much high school mathematics as possible in preparation for starting calculus in their freshman year. High school study of physics and chemistry is desirable.

Transfer Students

Because of the sequential nature of the physics curriculum, it is useful for students from two-year colleges to complete as much as possible of calculus, differential equations, several-variable calculus, chemistry, and calculus-based physics (part of an associate's degree) before transferring.

Years Completed Before Transfer Suggested Completed Courses UO Equivalent Courses
Two, more than two One year of differential and integral calculus MATH 251–253-253
Two, more than two One year of calculus general physics with laboratory PHYS 251–253-253, PHYS 290
Two, more than two General chemistry CH 221–222-222 or CH 224H–225H-225H
Two, more than two One term of differential equations and two terms of multivariable calculus MATH 256, MATH 281–282-282
More than two Second year of physics

Transfer students should also have completed as many as possible of the university requirements for the bachelor’s degree (see Bachelor’s Degree Requirements).

Careers

Fifty percent of graduates with bachelor’s degrees in physics find employment in the private sector working as applied physicists, software developers, managers, or technicians, typically alongside engineers and computer scientists. About 30 percent of students who earn an undergraduate degree continue their studies in a graduate degree program, leading to a career in teaching or research or both at a university, at a government laboratory, or in industry. In addition, a degree in physics is good preparation for a career in business. Students who have demonstrated their ability with a good record in an undergraduate physics program are generally considered very favorably for admission to medical and other professional schools.

Major Requirements

The major in physics leads to a bachelor of arts (BA) or a bachelor of science degree (BS). Complete requirements are listed under Bachelor’s Degree Requirements. The bachelor of arts degree has a second-language requirement. Knowledge of a language other than English is recommended for students planning graduate study in physics.

Required courses must be taken for letter grades and a grade point average of 2.00 (mid-C) or better must be earned in these courses. Courses beyond the minimum requirement may be taken pass/no pass (P/N). At least 20 of the upper-division credits must be completed in residence at the University of Oregon. Exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the physics director of undergraduate studies.

Undergraduate research is strongly encouraged. Laboratory courses such as Foundations of Physics Laboratory (PHYS 290) and Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory (PHYS 391) provide the correct foundation. Approximately 50 percent of physics undergraduates engage in substantive research during their course of study—typically beginning with Research Project I-III (PHYS 491–493). Contact the physics advisor for more information.

The sequential nature of physics courses makes it imperative to start planning a major program in physics early. Interested students should consult the advisor in the Department of Physics near the beginning of their studies.  The programs assume that students are prepared to take calculus in their freshman year. Consult the physics advisor for assistance in planning a specific program adapted to a student’s individual needs.

Bachelor of Arts: Physics

Physics Core Courses
MATH 251–253Calculus I-III12
or MATH 261–263 Calculus with Theory I-III
PHYS 251–253Foundations of Physics I12
MATH 256Introduction to Differential Equations4
MATH 281–282Several-Variable Calculus I-II8
PHYS 290Foundations of Physics Laboratory 12
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II12
PHYS 391Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory4
Interdisciplinary Science Core
Two from the following: 28
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Advanced General Chemistry I
Advanced General Chemistry II
General Biology I: Cells
General Biology II: Organisms
General Biology III: Populations
Computer Science I
Computer Science II
Computer Science III
Dynamic Planet Earth
Scientific Investigation in Physiology
Physics Upper-Division Courses24
Three upper-division laboratory courses 36
Total Credits92

Physics Sample Program

First YearCredits
CH 221–222General Chemistry (or any two courses from the Interdisciplinary Science Core) 8
PHYS 251–253Foundations of Physics I 12
PHYS 290Foundations of Physics Laboratory (two or more terms) 2
MATH 251–253Calculus I-III 12
Second Year
MATH 256Introduction to Differential Equations 4
MATH 281–282Several-Variable Calculus I-II 8
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II 12
PHYS 391Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory 4
Third Year
PHYS 411–413Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 12
Upper-division laboratory course from the following list: PHYS 424–425, PHYS 431–432, PHYS 491–493, or PHYS 401  2-4
Fourth Year
PHYS 414–415Quantum Physics 8
PHYS 417Topics in Quantum Physics 4
Upper-division laboratory course from the following list: PHYS 424–425, PHYS 431–432, PHYS 491–493, or PHYS 401  2-4
 Total Credits: 91-94

Bachelor of Science: Physics

Physics Core Courses
MATH 251–253Calculus I-III12
or MATH 261–263 Calculus with Theory I-III
PHYS 251–253Foundations of Physics I12
MATH 256Introduction to Differential Equations4
MATH 281–282Several-Variable Calculus I-II8
PHYS 290Foundations of Physics Laboratory 12
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II12
PHYS 391Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory4
Interdisciplinary Science Core
Two from the following: 28
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Advanced General Chemistry I
Advanced General Chemistry II
General Biology I: Cells
General Biology II: Organisms
General Biology III: Populations
Computer Science I
Computer Science II
Computer Science III
Dynamic Planet Earth
Scientific Investigation in Physiology
Physics Upper-Division Courses24
Three upper-division laboratory courses 36
Total Credits92

Physics Sample Program

First YearCredits
CH 221–222General Chemistry (or any two courses from the Interdisciplinary Science Core) 8
PHYS 251–253Foundations of Physics I 12
PHYS 290Foundations of Physics Laboratory (two or more terms) 2
MATH 251–253Calculus I-III 12
Second Year
MATH 256Introduction to Differential Equations 4
MATH 281–282Several-Variable Calculus I-II 8
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II 12
PHYS 391Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory 4
Third Year
PHYS 411–413Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 12
Upper-division laboratory course from the following list: PHYS 424–425, PHYS 431–432, PHYS 491–493, or PHYS 401  2-4
Fourth Year
PHYS 414–415Quantum Physics 8
PHYS 417Topics in Quantum Physics 4
Upper-division laboratory course from the following list: PHYS 424–425, PHYS 431–432, PHYS 491–493, or PHYS 401  2-4
 Total Credits: 91-94

Sample Programs for Transfer Students

These sample programs are for transfer students who have completed two years of college work including one year of calculus, one year of general physics with laboratories, one year of general chemistry, and as many as possible of the university requirements for the bachelor’s degree. In addition to graduation requirements for the bachelor’s degree, transfer students should plan to take the following courses, depending on their area of emphasis:

Third YearCredits
MATH 256Introduction to Differential Equations 4
MATH 281–282Several-Variable Calculus I-II 8
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II 12
PHYS 391Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory 4
Fourth Year
PHYS 411–413Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 12
PHYS 414–415Quantum Physics 8
PHYS 417Topics in Quantum Physics 4
PHYS 422Electromagnetism 4
Select one or two of the following:  4-8
Classical Optics 4
Modern Optics 4
Analog Electronics 4
Digital Electronics 4
Research Project I 4
Research Project II 4
Research Project III 4
Mathematics or physics electives or both  8
 Total Credits: 68-72

Honors

To be recommended by the faculty for graduation with honors in physics, a student must complete at least 46 credits in upper-division physics courses, of which at least 40 credits must be taken for letter grades, and earn at least a 3.50 grade point average in these courses.

As an alternative, undergraduate research leading to the defense of a thesis accompanied by at least a 3.30 grade point average can lead to recommendation for graduation with honors. Contact the director of undergraduate studies for more information.

Minor Requirements

Pre-Minor Requirements
PHYS 251–253Foundations of Physics I 112
or PHYS 201–203 General Physics
Required Courses
PHYS 351–353Foundations of Physics II12
or PHYS 411–413 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism
Select one of the following:4
Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory
400-level physics course
Physics courses8
Total Credits36

Additional Requirements

Course work must be completed with grades of C– or better or P. At least 12 of the upper-division credits must be completed in residence at the University of Oregon.

Engineering

Students interested in engineering may complete preparatory course work at the University of Oregon before enrolling in a professional engineering program at another institution. The Department of Physics coordinates a three-plus-two program that allows a student to earn a bachelor’s degree in physics from Oregon and one in engineering from another institution. For more information, see Preparatory Programs in the Academic Advising section of this catalog.

Engineering students interested in semiconductor process engineering or polymer science may be interested in the nationally recognized master's industrial internship program. For more information, visit internship.uoregon.edu.

Preparation for Kindergarten through Secondary School Teaching Careers

The College of Education offers a fifth-year program for middle-secondary teaching licensure in physics and integrated sciences and a program for elementary teaching. Students considering a career pathway to teaching should consider following the physics teaching emphasis to prepare for the licensure programs. More information is available from the department’s education advisor, Dean Livelybrooks; see also the College of Education section of this catalog.

Four-Year Degree Plan

Bachelor of Arts in Physics

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 251 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
CH 221 General Chemistry I 4
MATH 251 Calculus I 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
 Credits 17
Winter
PHYS 252 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
CH 222 General Chemistry II 4
MATH 252 Calculus II 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
 Credits 17
Spring
PHYS 253 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
MATH 253 Calculus III 4
CIS 210 Computer Science I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 51
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 351 Foundations of Physics II 4
MATH 281 Several-Variable Calculus I 4
PHYS 391 Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory 4
General education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 353 Foundations of Physics II 4
MATH 282 Several-Variable Calculus II 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 353 Foundations of Physics II 4
MATH 256 Introduction to Differential Equations 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 412 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 411 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
PHYS 413 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
General-education course in social science 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 422 Electromagnetism 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 414 Quantum Physics 4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 415 Quantum Physics 4
PHYS 431 Analog Electronics 4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 417 Topics in Quantum Physics 4
PHYS 432 Digital Electronics 4
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Bachelor of Science in Physics

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 251 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
CH 221 General Chemistry I 4
MATH 251 Calculus I 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
 Credits 17
Winter
PHYS 252 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
CH 222 General Chemistry II 4
MATH 252 Calculus II 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
 Credits 17
Spring
PHYS 253 Foundations of Physics I 4
PHYS 290 Foundations of Physics Laboratory 1
MATH 253 Calculus III 4
CIS 210 Computer Science I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 51
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 351 Foundations of Physics II 4
PHYS 391 Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory 4
MATH 281 Several-Variable Calculus I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 352 Foundations of Physics II 4
MATH 282 Several-Variable Calculus II 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 353 Foundations of Physics II 4
MATH 256 Introduction to Differential Equations 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 412 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 411 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
PHYS 413 Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 422 Electromagnetism 4
Elective courses 12
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHYS 414 Quantum Physics 4
Elective courses 12
 Credits 16
Winter
PHYS 415 Quantum Physics 4
PHYS 431 Analog Electronics 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
PHYS 417 Topics in Quantum Physics 4
PHYS 432 Digital Electronics 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

The Department of Physics offers graduate programs leading to the master of science degree in applied physics or to the master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees in physics with a variety of opportunities for research. Current research areas include astronomy and astrophysics, biophysics, condensed matter physics, elementary particle physics, and optical physics.

The interdisciplinary Institute for Fundamental Science (IFS) enhances the experimental, theoretical, and astronomy research activities at the University of Oregon. IFS is one of several centers and institutes supported by the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation, and maintains a close relationship with the Department of Physics as well as the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Mathematics.

The Materials Science Institute and the Oregon Center for Optics provide facilities, support, and research guidance for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the interdisciplinary application of concepts and techniques from both physics and chemistry to understanding physical systems.

Cooperative programs of study are possible in molecular biology through the Institute of Molecular Biology.

Pine Mountain Observatory

Pine Mountain Observatory, operated by the Department of Physics for research and advanced instruction in astronomy, is located thirty miles southeast of Bend, Oregon, off Highway 20 near Millican, at an altitude of 6,300 feet above sea level. The observatory has three telescopes—fifteen inches, twenty-four inches, and thirty-two inches in diameter—the largest governed by computer. All are Cassegrain reflectors. A wide-field CCD camera is available on the thirty-two-inch telescope. The site has an astronomers’ residence building and a caretaker’s house. Professional astronomical research is in progress at the observatory on every partially or totally clear night of the year, and the site is staffed year round.

Admission and Financial Aid

For admission to graduate study, a bachelor’s degree in physics or a related area is required with a minimum undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 (B) in advanced physics and mathematics courses. Submission of scores on the General Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), is required; the Physics GRE is strongly recommended. Students from non-English-speaking countries must demonstrate proficiency in English by submitting scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Information about the department and the Graduate Admission Application are available through the department’s website.

Financial aid in the form of graduate employee (GE) opportunities or research fellowships is available on a competitive basis to PhD students. GEs require approximately sixteen hours of work a week and provide a stipend and tuition waiver. New students are typically eligible only for teaching fellowships.

The sequential nature of most physics courses makes it difficult to begin graduate study in terms other than Fall. Furthermore, financial aid is usually available only to students who begin their studies in the Fall.

To ensure equal consideration for fall term admission, the deadline for applications for financial aid is January 15.

Degree Requirements

Entering students should consult closely with their assigned advisors. Students showing a lack of preparation are advised to take the necessary undergraduate courses in order to remedy their deficiencies.

Students should consult the Graduate School section of this catalog for general university admission and degree requirements. Departmental requirements, outlined in a handbook for incoming students that is available in the department office and online, are summarized below.

Industrial Internships and the Applied Physics Master’s Degree

The department offers a traditional master’s as well as an internship-based master’s program in applied physics, designed to serve physics students whose primary interests lie in applied research and development rather than in basic research. The Master’s Industrial Internship Program includes course work, professional development, and a nine-month paid internship that helps prepare physicists for a career in industry or government labs. The internship salary helps offset the cost of tuition for students in this program; the traditional master’s program does not include financial support.

Master of Science: Applied Physics

500- or 600-level courses 124
Industrial internship10
Additional graduate-level physics courses11-19
Total Credits45-53

Additional Requirements

For a student to be in good academic standing, the cumulative GPA of the graded-credit total must be 3.00 or better.

Graduate School requirements, including time limits, must be satisfied.

The applied physics master of science (MS) degree requires the completion of 54 total credits—24 graded credits at the 500 level or higher and 30 internship research credits. The internship requirement must be fulfilled through the industrial internship program. Internship credits are taken pass/no pass. A student who is working full-time as an intern typically earns 10 credits each term.

Graded credits must be selected from an approved departmental list. The table below highlights courses commonly taken by students in the Master’s Industrial Internship Program. Other 600-level physics courses qualify, but may require additional prerequisites. Some graduate-level courses in chemistry may qualify. Other courses may be added or substituted with the approval of the applied physics program advisor.

PHYS 581Design of Experiments4
PHYS 626Physical Optics with Labs4
PHYS 627Optical Materials and Devices4
PHYS 628Laser and Nonlinear Optics with OpticStudio4
PHYS 677MSemiconductor Device Physics4
PHYS 678MSemiconductor Processing and Characterization Technology4
PHYS 679MDevice Processing and Characterization Laboratory4
CH 680Electronics and Vacuum Systems4
CH 681Introduction to Electron Microscopy4
CH 682Electron Microprobe Analysis4
CH 683Surface Analysis4
CH 685Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy4

Master of Science: Physics

Typically this degree is based solely on course work. Detailed requirements can be found in the Graduate Student Handbook on the department’s website.

Candidates must either submit a written thesis or take a program of specialized courses.

Thesis Option

Select one of the following:9
Thesis
Thesis
and Research: [Topic]
Total Credits9

Specified-Course Option

The specified-courses option requires 40 graded graduate credits in physics with a GPA of at least 3.00 in these courses; 36 of those 40 credits must be selected from a list of courses approved by the department.

The master’s degree program is typically completed in four terms, unless sufficient transfer credits are available, in which case it can be obtained in three.

Master of Arts

Typically this degree is based solely on course work. Detailed requirements can be found in the Graduate Student Handbook on the department’s website.

Candidates must either submit a written thesis or take a program of specialized courses.

Thesis Option

Select one of the following:9
Thesis
Thesis
and Research: [Topic]
Total Credits9

Specified-Course Option

The specified-courses option requires 40 graded graduate credits in physics with a GPA of at least 3.00 in these courses; 36 of those 40 credits must be selected from a list of courses approved by the department.

The master’s degree program is typically completed in four terms, unless sufficient transfer credits are available, in which case it can be obtained in three.

In addition to all the preceding requirements, candidates for the master of arts (MA) degree must demonstrate foreign-language proficiency.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctor of philosophy degree (PhD) in physics is based primarily on demonstrated knowledge of physics and doctoral dissertation research. PhD students also must take and pass the core graduate sequences, listed below, achieving a B– or better grade in each course. Courses may be retaken once to achieve this minimum grade. The director of graduate studies can selectively waive these requirements in exceptional cases:

Core Sequences
PHYS 611
PHYS 612
Theoretical Mechanics
and Theoretical Mechanics
6
PHYS 613
PHYS 614
Statistical Physics
and Statistical Physics
6
PHYS 622
PHYS 623
Electromagnetic Theory
and Electromagnetic Theory
8
PHYS 631
PHYS 632
PHYS 633
Quantum Mechanics
and Quantum Mechanics
and Quantum Mechanics
12
Breadth Requirements
Six breadth courses 1

Next, students must locate an advisor and an advisory committee, who then administer a comprehensive oral examination testing whether the student is ready to undertake dissertation research. The heart of the PhD requirements is research leading to a doctoral dissertation.

Detailed information is available in the Graduate Student Handbook on the department’s website.

Astronomy Courses

Course usage information

ASTR 121. The Solar System. 4 Credits.

Naked-eye astronomy, development of astronomical concepts, and the solar system.

Course usage information

ASTR 122. Birth and Death of Stars. 4 Credits.

The structure and evolution of stars.

Course usage information

ASTR 123. Galaxies and the Expanding Universe. 4 Credits.

Galaxies and the universe.

Course usage information

ASTR 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ASTR 321. Topics in Astrophysics. 4 Credits.

Problem solving of the orbits, kinematics, and dynamics of astronomical systems, structure and evolution of stars and galaxies.
Pre- or coreq: MATH 252; PHYS 252 or equivalents.

Physics Courses

Course usage information

PHYS 101. Essentials of Physics. 4 Credits.

Fundamental physical principles. Mechanics.

Course usage information

PHYS 152. Physics of Sound and Music. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the wave nature of sound; hearing; musical instruments and scales; auditorium acoustics; and the transmission, storage, and reproduction of sound.

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PHYS 153. Physics of Light, Color, and Vision. 4 Credits.

Light and color, their nature, how they are produced, and how they are perceived and interpreted.

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PHYS 155. Physics behind the Internet. 4 Credits.

How discoveries in 20th-century physics mesh to drive modern telecommunications. Topics include electron mobility in matter, the development of transistors and semiconductors, lasers, and optical fibers.

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PHYS 156M. Scientific Revolutions. 4 Credits.

Surveys several major revolutions in our views of the natural and technological world, focusing on scientific concepts and methodological aspects. For nonscience majors. Multilisted with ERTH 156M.

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PHYS 161. Physics of Energy and Environment. 4 Credits.

Practical study of energy generation and environmental impact, including energy fundamentals, fossil fuel use, global warming, nuclear energy, and energy conservation.

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PHYS 162. Solar and Other Renewable Energies. 4 Credits.

Topics include photovoltaic cells, solar thermal power, passive solar heating, energy storage, geothermal energy, and wind energy.

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PHYS 171. The Physics of Life. 4 Credits.

Explores how physical laws guide the structure, function, and behavior of living organisms, and examines the physical properties of biological materials. Topics span microscropic and macroscopic scales.

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PHYS 181. Quantum Mechanics for Everyone. 4 Credits.

Introduction to quantum mechanics, a set of sometimes counterintuitive scientific principals describing atoms and light, along with the modern technologies it makes possible.

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PHYS 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 198. Worskhop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 201. General Physics. 4 Credits.

Introductory series. Mechanics and fluids.
Prereq: MATH 112 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PHYS 202. General Physics. 4 Credits.

Introductory series. Thermodynamics, waves, optics.
Prereq: PHYS 201.

Course usage information

PHYS 203. General Physics. 4 Credits.

Introductory series. Electricity, magnetism, modern physics.
Prereq: PHYS 201.

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PHYS 204. Introductory Physics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Practical exploration of the principles studied in general-physics lecture. Measurement and analysis methods applied to experiments in mechanics, waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Sequence.
Pre- or coreq: PHYS 201.

Course usage information

PHYS 205. Introductory Physics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Practical exploration of the principles studied in general-physics lecture. Measurement and analysis methods applied to experiments in mechanics, waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
Pre- or coreq: PHYS 202.

Course usage information

PHYS 206. Introductory Physics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Practical exploration of the principles studied in general-physics lecture. Measurement and analysis methods applied to experiments in mechanics, waves, sound, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
Pre- or coreq: PHYS 203.

Course usage information

PHYS 251. Foundations of Physics I. 4 Credits.

Newtonian mechanics; units and vectors; one-dimensional motion; Newton’s laws; work and energy; momentum and collisions. Sequence.
Coreq: MATH 251; Prereq MATH 112 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PHYS 252. Foundations of Physics I. 4 Credits.

Vibrations and waves; oscillations; wave mechanics; dispersion; modes; introductory optics.
Prereq: PHYS 251; coreq: MATH 252 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PHYS 253. Foundations of Physics I. 4 Credits.

Electricity and magnetism; charge and electric field; electric potential; circuits; magnetic field; inductance.
Prereq: PHYS 252; coreq: MATH 253 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PHYS 290. Foundations of Physics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Repeatable. Introduction to laboratory measurements, reports, instrumentation, and experimental techniques. Repeatable twice for maximum of 3 credits.
Coreq: PHYS 251, PHYS 252 or PHYS 253.

Course usage information

PHYS 299. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 351. Foundations of Physics II. 4 Credits.

Introduction to relativity and quantum physics with applications to atomic, solid-state, nuclear, and astro-particle systems
Prereq: MATH 253, PHYS 253; coreq: MATH 256 or MATH 281.

Course usage information

PHYS 352. Foundations of Physics II. 4 Credits.

Thermodynamic systems; first and second laws; kinetic theory of gases; entropy. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 351; coreq: MATH 281.

Course usage information

PHYS 353. Foundations of Physics II. 4 Credits.

Thermal radiation; Maxell-Boltzmann statistics; Fermi and Bose gases; phase transitions. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 352; coreq: MATH 282.

Course usage information

PHYS 362. Biological Physics. 4 Credits.

Physical principles governing biological systems. Topics include molecular machines, DNA and other macromolecules, signaling and information transfer, entropic forces, and physical mechanisms of self-organization.
Prereq: PHYS 351 or PHYS 353.

Course usage information

PHYS 369M. Science of Climbing. 2 Credits.

Introduction to the physics and scientific principles behind climbing, climbing equipment, anchors, ropes, climbing gear, static versus dynamic load, fall factor, and breaking strength. A prerequisite is students must have completed at least one Outdoor Program climbing course. Multilisted with PEO 369M.
Prereq: PEO 251.

Course usage information

PHYS 391. Physics Experimentation Data Analysis Laboratory. 4 Credits.

Practical aspects of physics experimentation, including data acquisition, statistical analysis, and introduction to scientific programming, and use of Fourier methods for data analysis.

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PHYS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 400M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 409. Supervised Tutoring. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 411. Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism. 4 Credits.

Fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, small oscillations, planetary motion, systems of particles. Electromagnetic phenomena. Only nonmajors may earn graduate credit.
Prereq: MATH 282.

Course usage information

PHYS 412. Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism. 4 Credits.

Fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, small oscillations, planetary motion, systems of particles. Electromagnetic phenomena.
Prereq: MATH 281.

Course usage information

PHYS 413. Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism. 4 Credits.

Fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, small oscillations, planetary motion, systems of particles. Electromagnetic phenomena.
Prereq: PHYS 412.

Course usage information

PHYS 414. Quantum Physics. 4 Credits.

Planck's and de Broglie's postulates, the uncertainty principle, Bohr's model of the atom, the Schroedinger equation in one dimension, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, molecules and solids, nuclei and elementary particles. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 413.

Course usage information

PHYS 415. Quantum Physics. 4 Credits.

Planck's and de Broglie's postulates, the uncertainty principle, Bohr's model of the atom, the Schroedinger equation in one dimension, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, molecules and solids, nuclei and elementary particles. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 414.

Course usage information

PHYS 417. Topics in Quantum Physics. 4 Credits.

Perturbation theory, variational principle, time-dependent perturbation theory, elementary scattering theory.
Prereq: PHYS 415.

Course usage information

PHYS 421M. Partial Differential Equations: Fourier Analysis I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to PDEs with a view towards applications in physics. Wave and heat equations, classical Fourier series on the circle, Bessel and Legendre series. Multilisted with MATH 421M.
Prereq: MATH 253; one from MATH 256, MATH 281.

Course usage information

PHYS 422. Electromagnetism. 4 Credits.

Study of electromagnetic waves. Topics include Maxwell's equations, wave equation, plane waves, guided waves, antennas, and other related phenomena.
Prereq: PHYS 413.

Course usage information

PHYS 424. Classical Optics. 4 Credits.

Geometrical optics, polarization, interference, Frauenhofer and Fresnel diffraction.
Prereq: PHYS 353.

Course usage information

PHYS 425. Modern Optics. 4 Credits.

Special topics in modern applied optics such as Fourier optics, coherence theory, resonators and lasers, holography, and image processing.
Prereq: PHYS 424.

Course usage information

PHYS 431. Analog Electronics. 4 Credits.

Passive and active discrete components and circuits. General circuit concepts and theorems. Equivalent circuits and black box models. Integrated circuit operational amplifiers.
Prereq: PHYS 203 or equivalent; knowledge of complex numbers; MATH 256.

Course usage information

PHYS 432. Digital Electronics. 4 Credits.

Digital electronics including digital logic, measurement, signal processing and control. Introduction to computer interfacing.
Prereq: PHYS 203 or equivalent; MATH 253.

Course usage information

PHYS 481. Design of Experiments. 4 Credits.

Applies statistics to practical data analysis, data-based decision making, model building, and the design of experiments. Emphasizes factorial designs.

Course usage information

PHYS 491. Research Project I. 2-4 Credits.

For physics and other science majors, Physics Projects entails construction and use of apparatus, interfaces and computers to perform technically-sophisticated experiments, analyze and communicate results.
Prereq: PHYS 391 or PHYS 399.

Course usage information

PHYS 492. Research Project II. 2-4 Credits.

For physics and other science majors, Physics Projects entails construction and use of apparatus, interfaces and computers to perform technically-sophisticated experiments, analyze and communicate results.
Prereq: PHYS 491.

Course usage information

PHYS 493. Research Project III. 2-4 Credits.

For physics and other science majors, Physics Projects entails construction and use of apparatus, interfaces and computers to perform technically-sophisticated experiments, analyze and communicate results.
Prereq: PHYS 492.

Course usage information

PHYS 500M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 521M. Partial Differential Equations: Fourier Analysis I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to PDEs with a view towards applications in physics. Wave and heat equations, classical Fourier series on the circle, Bessel and Legendre series. Multilisted with MATH 521M.

Course usage information

PHYS 581. Design of Experiments. 4 Credits.

Applies statistics to practical data analysis, data-based decision making, model building, and the design of experiments. Emphasizes factorial designs.

Course usage information

PHYS 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.
Coreq: good standing in applied physics master's degree program.

Course usage information

PHYS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Astrophysics and Gravitation, Biophysics, Condensed Matter, High Energy Physics, Physics Colloquium, Theoretical Physics.

Course usage information

PHYS 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 609. Supervised Tutoring. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PHYS 611. Theoretical Mechanics. 4 Credits.

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, small oscillations, rigid bodies. Sequence.

Course usage information

PHYS 612. Theoretical Mechanics. 2 Credits.

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, small oscillations, rigid bodies. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 611.

Course usage information

PHYS 613. Statistical Physics. 2 Credits.

Thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, application to gases, liquids, solids, atoms, molecules, and the structure of matter. Sequence.

Course usage information

PHYS 614. Statistical Physics. 4 Credits.

Thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, application to gases, liquids, solids, atoms, molecules, and the structure of matter. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 613.

Course usage information

PHYS 622. Electromagnetic Theory. 4 Credits.

Microscopic form of Maxwell's equations, derivation and solution of the wave equation, Lorentz covariant formulation, motion of charges in given fields, propagation and diffraction, radiation by given sources, coupled motion of sources and fields, the electromagnetic field in dense media.

Course usage information

PHYS 623. Electromagnetic Theory. 4 Credits.

Microscopic form of Maxwell's equations, derivation and solution of the wave equation, Lorentz covariant formulation, motion of charges in given fields, propagation and diffraction, radiation by given sources, coupled motion of sources and fields, the electromagnetic field in dense media. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 622.

Course usage information

PHYS 626. Physical Optics with Labs. 4 Credits.

Fundamentals of applied geometric and wave optics theory, reinforced through homework assignments, and explored in experiments conducted with lasers and optical components. Sequence with PHYS 627, PHYS 628.

Course usage information

PHYS 627. Optical Materials and Devices. 4 Credits.

Principles of quantum mechanics and solid-state physics relating to material properties of optoelectronic devices with corresponding laboratories teaching how to operate and characterize these devices. Sequence with PHYS 626, PHYS 628.
Prereq: PHYS 626 with B- or better grade.

Course usage information

PHYS 628. Laser and Nonlinear Optics with OpticStudio. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the nature of laser and nonlinear optics and the practical systems that utilize these phenomena with computational simulations using Zemax OpticStudio software. Sequence with PHYS 626, PHYS 627.
Prereq: PHYS 627 with B- or better grade.

Course usage information

PHYS 631. Quantum Mechanics. 4 Credits.

Review of fundamentals, central force problems, matrix mechanics. Sequence.

Course usage information

PHYS 632. Quantum Mechanics. 4 Credits.

Approximation methods, scattering. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 631.

Course usage information

PHYS 633. Quantum Mechanics. 4 Credits.

Rotation symmetry, spin, identical particles. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 632.

Course usage information

PHYS 661. Particle Physics I. 4 Credits.

Theory, phenomenology, and experimental basis of the standard model of particle physics: fundamentals; symmetries; quantum electrodynamics; R; quarks and leptons; chirality; flavor symmetry; mesons; baryons; form factors; deep inelastic scattering. Sequence.

Course usage information

PHYS 662. Particle Physics II. 4 Credits.

Theory, phenomenology, and experimental basis of the standard model of particle physics: quantum chromodynamics; parton distribution functions; hadron-hadron collisions; particle interactions in matter; collider detectors; experimental methodologies to analyze data; statistical thresholds and significance. Sequence with PHYS 661, PHYS 663.
Prereq: PHYS 661.

Course usage information

PHYS 663. Particle Physics III. 4 Credits.

Theory, phenomenology, and experimental basis of the standard model of particle physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; CKM mixing; Higgs couplings; early universe cosmology; Friedmann expansion; entropy; freeze-out; impact of neutrinos on cosmology; dark matter evidence and candidates. Sequence with PHYS 661, PHYS 662.
Prereq: PHYS 662.

Course usage information

PHYS 664. Quantum Field Theory. 4 Credits.

Canonical quantization, path integral formulation of quantum field theory, Feynman rules for perturbation theory, quantum electrodynamics, renormalization, gauge theory of the strong and electroweak interactions. Sequence with PHYS 665, PHYS 666.

Course usage information

PHYS 665. Quantum Field Theory II. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to apply the methodology established in QFT I to theories of charged fermions coupled to a photon. Then we will begin to explore QFT beyond leading order. Sequence with PHYSS 664, PHYS 666.
Prereq: PHYS 664.

Course usage information

PHYS 666. Quantum Field Theory III. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to understand QFT at loop level, and to extend the formalism to non-Abelian gauge bosons. In addition, we will cover a variety of special topics. This course is designed to be the last quarter of a full year sequence. Sequence with PHYS 664, PHYS 665.
Prereq: PHYS 665.

Course usage information

PHYS 671. Solid State Physics. 4 Credits.

Crystallography; thermal, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of solids; band theory; metals, semiconductors, and insulators; defects in solids. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 633.

Course usage information

PHYS 672. Solid State Physics. 4 Credits.

Crystallography; thermal, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of solids; band theory; metals, semiconductors, and insulators; defects in solids. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 671.

Course usage information

PHYS 674. Theory of Condensed Matter. 4 Credits.

Advanced topics include quantum and statistical description of many-particle systems, electronic structure, elementary excitations in solids and fluids, critical phenomena, statics and dynamics of soft condensed matter. Topics and emphasis vary.
Prereq: PHYS 673.

Course usage information

PHYS 675. Theory of Condensed Matter. 4 Credits.

Advanced topics include quantum and statistical description of many-particle systems, electronic structure, elementary excitations in solids and fluids, critical phenomena, statics and dynamics of soft condensed matter. Topics and emphasis vary.
Prereq: PHYS 674.

Course usage information

PHYS 677M. Semiconductor Device Physics. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the theory behind semiconductors. Elementary theory of inorganic solids; electronic structures and transport properties. Basic theory of devices including diodes, transistors, mosfets, and optoelectronic devices. Offered only in summer. Sequence with PHYS 678M, PHYS 679M. Multilisted with CH 677M.

Course usage information

PHYS 678M. Semiconductor Processing and Characterization Technology. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the techniques required to make semiconductors and test their properties. Solid-state and surface chemistry of inorganic semiconductors as it pertains to microelectronic devices. Offered only in summer. Multilisted with CH 678M. Sequence with PHYS 677M, PHYS 679M.
Prereq: PHYS 677M.

Course usage information

PHYS 679M. Device Processing and Characterization Laboratory. 4 Credits.

Students use theory and techniques learned to design, fabricate, and test a device that performs a specific function, with an emphasis on wafer processing and device realization. Offered only in summer. Sequence with PHYS 677M, PHYS 678M. Multilisted with CH 679M.
Prereq: CH 678M.

Course usage information

PHYS 684. Quantum Optics and Laser Physics. 4 Credits.

Nonlinear optical processes and quantum statistical properties of light produced by such processes, laser theory, wave mixing processes, optical Bloch equations, field quantization, photon statistics, cooperative emissions. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 354 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PHYS 685. Quantum Optics and Laser Physics. 4 Credits.

Nonlinear optical processes and quantum statistical properties of light produced by such processes, laser theory, wave mixing processes, optical Bloch equations, field quantization, photon statistics, cooperative emissions. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 684; coreq PHYS 631.

Course usage information

PHYS 686. Quantum Optics and Laser Physics. 4 Credits.

Nonlinear optical processes and quantum statistical properties of light produced by such processes, laser theory, wave mixing processes, optical Bloch equations, field quantization, photon statistics, cooperative emissions. Sequence.
Prereq: PHYS 685; coreq: PHYS 632.