Global Studies

http://intldept.uoregon.edu

Kathie Carpenter, Department Head
541-346-5051
175 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall
5206 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-5206

The Department of Global Studies (formerly the Department of International Studies) offers bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS), and master of arts (MA) degrees in global studies and minors in global studies and global health. The programs are tailored to give students the theoretical tools to make sense of the fast-changing global arena; ensure the practical application of their research; immerse them in the language, history, and culture of a major world region; ensure they live, study, conduct research, or hold an internship that enhances their intercultural knowledge, understanding, and skills; and help them develop a professional concentration area suitable for their career goals. For the Global Studies undergraduate programs, professional concentration and geographic focus options are listed in the Undergraduate section of the department page.

The Department of Global Studies is a member of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs and the International Studies Association. These associations provide more opportunities in research, internships, funding, and employment for global studies students.

 

Faculty

Yvonne A. Braun, professor (gender and development, social change, Africa). BA, 1994, State University of New York, Geneseo; MA, 2000, PhD, 2005, California, Irvine. (2005)

Kathie Carpenter, associate professor (childhood, children's museums, Southeast Asia). BA, 1975, California, San Diego; MA, 1983, PhD, 1987, Stanford. (1989)

Dennis C. Galvan, professor (comparative politics, international development, Africa and Indonesia). BA, 1987, Stanford; MA, 1990, PhD, 1996, California, Berkeley. (2001)

Derrick Hindery, associate professor (environment and development, global economic restructuring, indigenous movements, Latin America). BA, 1994, MA, 1997, PhD, 2003, California, Los Angeles. (2007)

Galen Martin, senior instructor II (environmental and cultural geography, global food security, Latin America). AA, 1977, Hesston College; BA, 1980, Goshen College; MA, 1985, Oregon; PhD, 2003, California, Davis. (1998)

David Meek, assistant professor (food sovereignty, popular education, India and Brazil). BA, 2004, Bard College; MSc, 2007, Antioch, New England; PhD, 2014, Georgia. (2018)

Gabe Paquette, professor (intellectual history, Portuguese and Spanish history, history of European empires). See History.

Lesley Jo Weaver, associate professor (health disparities, race, India and Brazil). BA, 2004, Smith College; MPH 2008, PhD, 2014, Emory University. (2018)

Anita M. Weiss, professor (gender and development, political Islam, South Asia). BA, 1975, Rutgers; MA, 1976, PhD, 1983, California, Berkeley. (1987)

Stephen R. Wooten, associate professor (local-global dynamics, food studies, Africa). BA, 1986, Massachusetts, Amherst; MA, 1993, PhD, 1997, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (1999)

Kristin Yarris, associate professor (global health, migration, Latin America). BA, 1994, Lewis and Clark College; MPH, MA, 2004, PhD, 2011, California, Los Angeles. (2012)

Emeritus

Gerald W. Fry, professor emeritus. BA, 1964, Stanford; MPA, 1966, Princeton; PhD, 1977, Stanford. (1981)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Carlos Aguirre, history

Ina Asim, history

Oluwakemi Balogun, women's, gender, and sexuality studies

Diane B. Baxter, anthropology

Erin Beck, political science

Bruce A. Blonigen, economics

Lindsay F. Braun, history

Daniel P. Buck, geography

Alfredo Burlando, economics

Mark Carey, honors college

Shankha Chakraborty, economics

Liska Chan, landscape architecture

Shaul E. Cohen, geography

Rick Colby, religious studies

Jane K. Cramer, political science

Robert L. Davis, Romance languages

André Djiffack, Romance languages

Maram Epstein, East Asian languages and literatures

Michael Fakhri, law

John B. Foster, sociology

Alisa D. Freedman, East Asian languages and literatures

Pedro García-Caro, Latin American studies

Ibrahim J. Gassama, law

Bryna Goodman, history

Sangita Gopal, English

Jeffrey E. Hanes, history

Robert S. Haskett, history

Michael Hibbard, planning, public policy and management

David Hollenberg, religious studies

Zhuo Jing-Schmidt, East Asian languages and literatures

Lamia Karim, anthropology

Craig Kauffman, political science

Karrie Koesel, political science

Nicolas Larco, architecture

Jeffrey Magoto, Yamada Language Center

Gabriela Martinez, journalism and communication

Michelle McKinley, law

Karen McPherson, Romance languages

Ronald B. Mitchell, political science

Alexander B. Murphy, geography

Michael Malek Najjar, theater arts

Kevin Nute, architecture

Eileen M. Otis, sociology

Craig Parsons, political science

Doris L. Payne, linguistics

Eric W. Pederson, linguistics

Philip W. Scher, anthropology

Carol T. Silverman, anthropology

Lars Skalnes, political science

Alison Snyder, architecture

H. Leslie Steeves, journalism and communication

Lynn Stephen, anthropology

Jeffrey Stolle, management

Xiaobo Su, geography

Tuong Vu, political science

Peter A. Walker, geography

Janis C. Weeks, biology

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Minors

 

Advising

Advising about specific major requirements is provided by Global Connections Advisors in the Tykeson College & Career Advising unit. Regular consultation with the Global Connections Advisors is strongly recommended for majors, premajors, and minors. Additionally, the role of the faculty mentor is central to the program. Students applying to the major are required to choose a faculty member with whom they have a common area of interest to act as their mentor, typically one of the core or participating faculty members named in the departmental faculty list or a faculty member from the student’s concentration areas, professional or geographic.

Admission

The first step for students planning to major in global studies is to declare the premajor. Students should make an appointment with a Global Connections Advisor to declare the premajor. Global studies premajors must first complete the requirements listed below before they can apply to the global studies major.

Students must maintain a grade point average of 3.00 (cumulative) or higher than 3.00 for three consecutive terms prior to the term of application.

Courses required for the premajor must be passed with a C– or better. Freshman seminars do not count toward this requirement. Students are strongly encouraged not to wait until their junior or senior year to apply. Premajor advising and help with the application process are available via appointments made with Global Connections Advisors in the Tykeson College & Career Advising unit. Applicants are required to meet with a Global Connections Advisor as part of the major application process. Applications are due on Monday of the fourth week of fall, winter, and spring terms.

In exceptional cases (and to accommodate transfer students), students entering the university may apply to become a global studies major without completing the required two terms. More information is available from the director of undergraduate studies.

GLBL 101Introduction to International Issues4
or GLBL 102 Foundations for Intercultural Competence
Select two of the following:
GLBL 230Global Wellbeing4
GLBL 240Perspectives on International Development4
GLBL 250Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective4
GLBL 270Globalization and the Global Economy4
Second-language sequence or equivalency demonstrated
WR 121College Composition I4
or WR 123 College Composition III

Additional Requirements

Courses must be passed with grades of C– or better to satisfy major requirements. In addition, three years’ proficiency in a second language is required (see below for details).

Courses applied to the major, with the exception of the language requirement and up to 8 credits in or , must be taken for letter grades.

A maximum of 12 credits in courses taken to fulfill the university group requirements may be applied toward the global studies major.

A maximum of 20 credits in courses taken in a single department other than global studies may be applied toward the global studies major, exclusive of the language requirement and the External Block B Professional Concentration option.

For the most current information about courses and requirements, visit the department website.

Language Requirement

To satisfy this requirement, students must achieve proficiency in a second language at a level associated with three years of study. Proficiency in the language may be demonstrated by passing three terms of a 300-level language sequence , by an examination, or by graduating from a high school in which English was not the medium of instruction.

A student may also fulfill the language requirement with two years’ proficiency in two different languages exclusive of the student’s native language. Students wishing to pursue this option must get approval from the director of undergraduate studies faculty.

Intercultural Experience

Majors must have a significant immersive intercultural experience to complete requirements for the major. One way that this can be satisfied is with at least one term (ten weeks) of study or work in another country that coincides with the student's geographic focus area. Contact the departmental advising office for information about other ways to satisfy this requirement. For information about study in another country, see Study Abroad in the Supplementary Academic Programming section of this catalog. Advice is available from the Office of International Affairs, 330 Oregon Hall. Domestic (US-based) cultural experiences and internships must be preapproved by the advising team.

Internship Option

Students may earn pass/no pass (P/N) credit for work done as interns. Interested students should consult with global studies advisors.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies

Below is an example of how to complete a BA in global studies with a diplomacy and international relations professional concentration and a Middle East geographic focus. Since the major offers 16 options for professional concentration areas and seven different geographic focus regions, with a wide variety of courses that can count toward each concentration, there are innumerable paths through the global studies major.

This degree plan is for general planning purposes only and, due to the interdisciplinary nature of the major, it is imperative that students speak with advisors to determine which courses would best match their personal, professional, and academic goals.

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 101 First-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 101 Introduction to International Issues 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 17
Winter
ARB 102 First-Year Arabic 5
WR 123 College Composition III 4
GLBL 250 Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 17
Spring
ARB 103 First-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 199 Special Studies: [Topic] 1-5
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 14-18
 Total Credits 48-52
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 201 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 240 Perspectives on International Development 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 17
Winter
ARB 202 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 260 Culture, Capitalism, and Globalization 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 17
Spring
ARB 203 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 280 Global Environmental Issues and Alternatives 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 51
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 301 Language and Culture 4
REL 335 Introduction to the Qur'an 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ARB 302 Language and Culture 4
GLBL 423 Development and the Muslim World 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ARB 303 Language and Culture 4
GLBL 431 Cross-Cultural Communication 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Winter
CRES 435 Israel and Palestine 4
SOC 465 Political Sociology 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
GLBL 422 Aid to Developing Countries 4
Elective courses 12
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Bachelor of Science in Global Studies

Below is an example of how to complete a BS in global studies with a diplomacy and international relations professional concentration and a Middle East geographic focus. Since the major offers 16 options for professional concentration areas and seven different geographic focus regions, with a wide variety of courses that can count toward each concentration, there are innumerable paths through the global studies major.

This degree plan is for general planning purposes only and, due to the interdisciplinary nature of the major, it is imperative that students speak with advisors to determine which courses would best match their personal, professional, and academic goals.

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 101 First-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 101 Introduction to International Issues 4
MATH 105 University Mathematics I 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
 Credits 17
Winter
ARB 102 First-Year Arabic 5
MATH 106 University Mathematics II 4
WR 123 College Composition III 4
GLBL 250 Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4
 Credits 17
Spring
ARB 103 First-Year Arabic 5
MATH 107 University Mathematics III 4
GLBL 199 Special Studies: [Topic] 1-5
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 14-18
 Total Credits 48-52
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 201 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 240 Perspectives on International Development 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 17
Winter
ARB 202 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 260 Culture, Capitalism, and Globalization 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 17
Spring
ARB 203 Second-Year Arabic 5
GLBL 280 Global Environmental Issues and Alternatives 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 51
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ARB 301 Language and Culture 4
REL 335 Introduction to the Qur'an 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ARB 302 Language and Culture 4
GLBL 423 Development and the Muslim World 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ARB 303 Language and Culture 4
GLBL 431 Cross-Cultural Communication 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 435 Environmental Justice 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Winter
SOC 465 Political Sociology 4
CRES 435 Israel and Palestine 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
GLBL 422 Aid to Developing Countries 4
Elective courses 12
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Graduate Programs

Global Studies (MA)

Courses

Course usage information

GLBL 101. Introduction to International Issues. 4 Credits.

Survey of major political, economic, and cultural themes in international studies through in-class debates on key contemporary issues.

Course usage information

GLBL 102. Foundations for Intercultural Competence. 4 Credits.

This course teaches practical skills and analytic frameworks that support safe, respectful, enlightening experiences of intercultural engagement.

Course usage information

GLBL 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 198. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 230. Global Wellbeing. 4 Credits.

Interdisciplinary introduction to human wellbeing, focusing on health, education, and the environment and the ways they impact wellbeing. Topics will be framed by the larger issue of whether or not something called "wellbeing" is a human universal, as well as how wellbeing can be improved.

Course usage information

GLBL 240. Perspectives on International Development. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major ideologies, theories, historical processes, and contemporary challenges in international development. Galvan.

Course usage information

GLBL 250. Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Credits.

Introduction to value systems of various cultures, focusing on how values relate to religion, forms of social organization, group affiliation, and patterns of conflict resolution.

Course usage information

GLBL 260. Culture, Capitalism, and Globalization. 4 Credits.

Cultural and historical perspectives on the development of capitalism as a way of life and its relationship to contemporary global issues and imbalances.

Course usage information

GLBL 270. Globalization and the Global Economy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the study of globalization and the global economy, analyzing ways the global economy is structured and maintained through various political interventions and regimes. This course aims to provide tools for understanding and explaining these structures and their impacts.

Course usage information

GLBL 280. Global Environmental Issues and Alternatives. 4 Credits.

Examines root causes of "environmental problems" at local, regional, national, and global scales. Critically compares approaches to addressing international environmental challenges.

Course usage information

GLBL 323. Islam and Global Forces. 4 Credits.

Addresses interactions between global forces and processes in historical and modern Muslim societies and the salience of Islam in contemporary global arenas. Sequence with GLBL 423. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

GLBL 340. Global Health and Development. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major issues in global health, their causes and possible solutions, with a focus on the poor in developing countries.

Course usage information

GLBL 345. Africa Today: Issues and Concerns. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to current challenges facing African peoples today. Extends survey of Africa courses, and prepares students for more advanced study regarding the African continent.

Course usage information

GLBL 350. Education and Development. 4 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the foundational ideas in the field of international and comparative education, and help build a theoretical toolkit of the major approaches scholars utilize when analyzing education from a global perspective.

Course usage information

GLBL 360. International Cooperation and Conflict. 4 Credits.

Utilizes case studies and selected themes to examine the root causes, stakeholder perspectives, and attempts to resolve international conflicts.

Course usage information

GLBL 370. International Human Rights. 4 Credits.

Survey of human rights, examining diverse perspectives on the concept, practice, and implementation of human rights and human rights regimes.

Course usage information

GLBL 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Special topics in international studies.

Course usage information

GLBL 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Closely supervised participation in the activities of public or private organizations, institutes, and community service agencies.

Course usage information

GLBL 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Africa: Development and Social Change. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

GLBL 415. The Global Story of Race. 4 Credits.

Working from a historical and cultural perspective, this course uses global case studies to explore how race came to be a key principle of social organization around the world through colonialism and extractive capitalism, and how it manifests today.

Course usage information

GLBL 420. Global Community Development. 4 Credits.

Introduction to communitarian theory and local-level grass-roots development practices. Comparison across North-South divide of efforts to alleviate poverty, promote sustainability, and ensure mobilization and cohesion.
Prereq: GLBL 240.

Course usage information

GLBL 421. Gender and International Development. 4 Credits.

Analysis of the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of Third World women as their societies undergo social upheavals associated with the problematic effects of development.
Prereq: GLBL 240.

Course usage information

GLBL 422. Aid to Developing Countries. 4 Credits.

Examines the history and current dynamics of international bilateral and multilateral development assistance, the possibilities and constraints of aid, and other related issues.
Prereq: GLBL 240.

Course usage information

GLBL 423. Development and the Muslim World. 4 Credits.

Introduction to discourse on current development in various Muslim societies. Focuses on North Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Weiss.

Course usage information

GLBL 424. United Nations Intervention in Global Crises. 4 Credits.

Explores the theory and practice of humanitarian aid, peace-building, and development during or after violent conflict. Focuses on work of international organizations in conflict areas or on issues of conflict.

Course usage information

GLBL 425. Global Food Security. 4 Credits.

Explores explanations for, and solutions to, persistent inequities in food access. Considers the political, agricultural, economic and humanitarian aspects of the global food system.

Course usage information

GLBL 431. Cross-Cultural Communication. 4 Credits.

Focuses on skills and insights needed by professionals working in cross-cultural settings. Considers values, development, education, politics, and environment as central to cross-cultural understanding.

Course usage information

GLBL 432. Indigenous Cultural Survival. 4 Credits.

Explores case studies of global indigenous peoples who are facing cultural survival issues and developing strategies and institutions to deal with this complex process.

Course usage information

GLBL 433. Childhood in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Credits.

Explores the experience of childhood around the world and examines how this experience is shaped by beliefs about who and what children are and by local conditions and contingencies.

Course usage information

GLBL 434. Language Issues for International Studies. 4 Credits.

Explores the influence of language on policy issues in societies around the world relative to nationalism, identity, multilingualism, education, human rights globalization, and language spread and loss.

Course usage information

GLBL 435. Global Perspectives on Disability. 2 Credits.

This class uses a human rights paradigm to examine issues facing people with disabilities throughout the world. Readings and discussions will emphasize cross-disability and cross-cultural approaches to gender and disability, international development and disability, inclusive educational models, and cross-cultural aspects of disability.

Course usage information

GLBL 442. South Asia: Development and Social Change. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the vast social changes and development issues confronting the South Asian subcontinent.

Course usage information

GLBL 444. Development and Social Change in Southeast Asia. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the region and to the complex social issues facing the peoples of Southeast Asia.

Course usage information

GLBL 445. Development and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa. 4 Credits.

Introduces theoretical and practical aspects of development and social change in sub-Saharan Africa, with focus on key issues in African development during the post-colonial era.

Course usage information

GLBL 446. Development and Social Change in Latin America. 4 Credits.

Explores development challenges, debt cycles, urban growth, neoliberalism, populism, socialism, gender, the environment, U.S.–Latin American relations, ecotourism, and drug geographies in the region.

Course usage information

GLBL 448. Bollywood's Lens on Indian Society. 4 Credits.

Explores Indian society through film, focusing on critical social issues; depicted vs. the historical reality; and ongoing transformations of social orientations and values.

Course usage information

GLBL 463. Population Displacement and Global Health. 4 Credits.

Explores health and mental health problems affecting displaced (migrant and refugee) communities and considers underdevelopment as a fundamental cause of displacement and health problems. Offered once per academic year.

Course usage information

GLBL 465. Global Reproductive Health. 4 Credits.

Overview of issues in global reproductive health, including politics, economics, historical and cultural factors. Implications for international health and development programs reviewed. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

GLBL 467. Global Mental Health. 4 Credits.

Overview of global mental health from a critical, anthropological, and historical perspective, with attention to cross-cultural differences in illness experience and treatment options.

Course usage information

GLBL 503. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Special topics in international studies.

Course usage information

GLBL 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 510. Experimental Course: [Topic). 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Africa: Development and Social Change. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

GLBL 515. The Global Story of Race. 4 Credits.

Working from a historical and cultural perspective, this course uses global case studies to explore how race came to be a key principle of social organization around the world through colonialism and extractive capitalism, and how it manifests today.

Course usage information

GLBL 520. Global Community Development. 4 Credits.

Introduction to communitarian theory and local-level grass-roots development practices. Comparison across North-South divide of efforts to alleviate poverty, promote sustainability, and ensure mobilization and cohesion.

Course usage information

GLBL 521. Gender and International Development. 4 Credits.

Analysis of the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of Third World women as their societies undergo social upheavals associated with the problematic effects of development.

Course usage information

GLBL 522. Aid to Developing Countries. 4 Credits.

Examines the history and current dynamics of international bilateral and multilateral development assistance, the possibilities and constraints of aid, and other related issues.

Course usage information

GLBL 523. Development and the Muslim World. 4 Credits.

Introduction to discourse on current development in various Muslim societies. Focuses on North Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

Course usage information

GLBL 524. United Nations Intervention in Global Crises. 4 Credits.

Explores the theory and practice of humanitarian aid, peace-building, and development during or after violent conflict. Focuses on work of international organizations in conflict areas or on issues of conflict.

Course usage information

GLBL 525. Global Food Security. 4 Credits.

Explores explanations for, and solutions to, persistent inequities in food access. Considers the political, agricultural, economic and humanitarian aspects of the global food system.

Course usage information

GLBL 531. Cross-Cultural Communication. 4 Credits.

Focuses on skills and insights needed by professionals working in cross-cultural settings. Considers values, development, education, politics, and environment as central to cross-cultural understanding.

Course usage information

GLBL 532. Indigenous Cultural Survival. 4 Credits.

Explores case studies of global indigenous peoples who are facing cultural survival issues and developing strategies and institutions to deal with this complex process.

Course usage information

GLBL 533. Childhood in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Credits.

Explores the experience of childhood around the world and examines how this experience is shaped by beliefs about who and what children are and by local conditions and contingencies.

Course usage information

GLBL 534. Language Issues for International Studies. 4 Credits.

Explores the influence of language on policy issues in societies around the world relative to nationalism, identity, multilingualism, education, human rights globalization, and language spread and loss.

Course usage information

GLBL 535. Global Perspectives on Disability. 2 Credits.

This class uses a human rights paradigm to examine issues facing people with disabilities throughout the world. Readings and discussions will emphasize cross-disability and cross-cultural approaches to gender and disability, international development and disability, inclusive educational models, and cross-cultural aspects of disability.

Course usage information

GLBL 542. South Asia: Development and Social Change. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the vast social changes and development issues confronting the South Asian subcontinent.

Course usage information

GLBL 544. Development and Social Change in Southeast Asia. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the region and to the complex social issues facing the peoples of Southeast Asia.

Course usage information

GLBL 545. Development and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa. 4 Credits.

Introduces theoretical and practical aspects of development and social change in sub-Saharan Africa, with focus on key issues in African development during the post-colonial era.

Course usage information

GLBL 546. Development and Social Change in Latin America. 4 Credits.

Explores development challenges, debt cycles, urban growth, neoliberalism, populism, socialism, gender, the environment, U.S.–Latin American relations,ecotourism, and drug geographies in the region.

Course usage information

GLBL 548. Bollywood’s Lens on Indian Society. 4 Credits.

Explores Indian society through film, focusing on critical social issues; depicted vs. the historical reality; and ongoing transformations of social orientations and values.

Course usage information

GLBL 563. Population Displacement and Global Health. 4 Credits.

Explores health and mental health problems affecting displaced (migrant and refugee) communities and considers underdevelopment as a fundamental cause of displacement and health problems. Offered once per academic year.

Course usage information

GLBL 565. Global Reproductive Health. 4 Credits.

Overview of issues in global reproductive health, including politics, economics, historical and cultural factors. Implications for international health and development programs reviewed. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

GLBL 567. Global Mental Health. 4 Credits.

Overview of global mental health from a critical, anthropological, and historical perspective, with attention to cross-cultural differences in illness experience and treatment options.

Course usage information

GLBL 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 608. Special Topics: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable

Course usage information

GLBL 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Closely supervised participation in the activities of public or private organizations, institutes, and community service agencies.

Course usage information

GLBL 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GLBL 655. International Studies Graduate Core Seminar. 4 Credits.

Graduate introduction to the field of International Studies, including exploration of development, culture, communication, and research methods, design, and ethics.

Course usage information

GLBL 656. Research and Writing in International Studies. 1 Credit.

Focus on conceptualizing research topics; accessing bibliographic databases; writing grant applications, reports, and theses.

Course usage information

GLBL 657. Proseminar: Proposal Writing. 2 Credits.

An introduction to thesis proposal writing for first-year graduate students in international studies.