Bachelor of Arts and Science in General Social Science

http://gss.uoregon.edu

Undergraduate Studies

The program has four concentrations or tracks. Each concentration has its own set of core courses and then provides a number of elective courses from various departments. Major requirements for each of the four concentrations may be found on the program website.

Applied Economics, Business, and Society

This track combines technical training in business with the analytical training of the liberal arts. It draws heavily from courses in the business college and the economics department to offer specific business skills while exploring how business functions in society, on the national level, and in the global context. This concentration is designed specifically for students who plan to work in business or to pursue a master of business administration degree.

Crime, Law, and Society

This track provides broad exposure to problems that confront society on the causes and consequences of, and policies on, crime, offering preparation for students with an interest in criminology, law practice, law enforcement, or social services.

Globalization, Environment, and Policy

This track focuses on broad social-political and environmental issues at the regional, national, and global levels, as well as the policy planning required to meet these issues within an interdisciplinary context. The globalization concentration provides training for students planning to work in green industry, government, NGOs, and environmental organizations. In addition, the track prepares students to earn graduate degrees in planning, public management, policy studies, or other applied social sciences with a global emphasis.

Social Studies Teaching

This track prepares students with the course requirements for admission to the graduate teacher licensure program at the University of Oregon—UO Teach. This concentration does not, in and of itself, lead to a teaching license; rather, it provides a well-defined content so that students are prepared to enroll in a graduate program to become licensed to teach social studies at the middle or high school level.

General social science majors are encouraged to consult with their advisors at least once a year to ensure their remaining course work is structured to meet all the requirements for the major. Students should notify the General Social Science Program office of their intention to graduate at least one term before the proposed graduation date.

Undergraduate Studies

The program has four concentrations or tracks. Each concentration has its own set of core courses and then provides a number of elective courses from various departments. Major requirements for each of the four concentrations may be found on the program website.

Applied Economics, Business, and Society

This track combines technical training in business with the analytical training of the liberal arts. It draws heavily from courses in the business college and the economics department to offer specific business skills while exploring how business functions in society, on the national level, and in the global context. This concentration is designed specifically for students who plan to work in business or to pursue a master of business administration degree.

GSS Applied Economics, Business, and Society Concentration
Preliminary Core
BA 101Introduction to Business4
EC 201Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics4
EC 202Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics4
Methods Requirement
BA 215Accounting: Language of Business Decisions4
MATH 243Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics4
Research Methods Requirement
Complete one of the following courses.4
Social Science Inquiry and Research
Thinking Like a Social Scientist
Research Methods
Policy and Planning Analysis
Specialization Requirements
Must take 7 of the following courses, at least two of the courses must be outside of Economics and Business.28
Management: Creating Value through People
Marketing: Creating Value for Customers
Finance: Creating Value through Capital
EC (All 300+ and 400+ courses approved, except 400 – 409.
Environmental Ethics
Geography of Globalization
Urban Geography
Tourism and Development
Contemporary Food Systems
Advanced Geography of Non-European-American Regions: [Topic]
Cross-Cultural Communication
American Business History
Soccer and Society in Latin America
Economic History of Modern Europe: [Topic]
American Economic History: [Topic]
Politics of Business
International Political Economy

Undergraduate Studies

The program has four concentrations or tracks. Each concentration has its own set of core courses and then provides a number of elective courses from various departments. Major requirements for each of the four concentrations may be found on the program website.

Crime, Law, and Society Concentration

This track provides broad exposure to problems that confront society on the causes and consequences of, and policies on, crime, offering preparation for students with an interest in criminology, law practice, law enforcement, or social services.

GSS Crime, Law, and Society Concentration
Preliminary Core
Must Take:
SOC 204Introduction to Sociology4
or SOC 207 Social Inequality
PS 275Legal Process4
ES 101Introduction to Ethnic Studies4
Methods Requirement
Complete one of the following courses:4
Social Science Inquiry and Research
Policy and Planning Analysis
Thinking Like a Social Scientist
Research Methods
Specialization Requirements
Must take 8 of the following courses:
Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
Anthropology of the United States
Advanced Forensic Anthropology
Music, Politics, and Race
Social Equity and Criminal Justice
Race and Incarceration
Race and Ethnicity and the Law: [Topic]
Prevention of Youth Violence
Prevention of Interpersonal Violence
Society, Culture, and Place
International Human Rights
Communication Law
Media Ethics
Semantics
Introduction to Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Language
Introduction to Public Law
Women and Politics
Gender in the Law
United States Congress
Race, Politics, and the Law
Civil Rights in Post-Warren Era
Constitutional Law
Matters of Life and Death
United States Supreme Court
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
Psychopathology
Culture and Mental Health
Psychology of Gender
Human Sexuality
Social Issues and Movements
Self and Society
Sociology of the Family
Urban Sociology
Introduction: Deviance, Control, and Crime
Issues in Sociology of Family: [Topic]
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity: [Topic]
Issues of Migration: [Topic]
Issues in Deviance, Control, and Crime: [Topic]
Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture
Women, Work, and Class

Requirements

Students must complete 48 credits with a minimum of 24 upper-division credits within the major.

Courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A maximum of one course with a grade of ‘P’ or ‘P*’ may be used.

Double Dipping Policy
GSS will accept a maximum of 3 courses that overlap (“double-dip”) with another major, or 1 course that overlaps with a minor. Please note that degree guide may not reflect the double-dipping policy and it will be the responsibility of the student to ensure they are meeting the requirements. For additional information, meet with an advisor (see Advising).

Undergraduate Studies

The program has four concentrations or tracks. Each concentration has its own set of core courses and then provides a number of elective courses from various departments. Major requirements for each of the four concentrations may be found on the program website.

Globalization, Environment, and Policy

This track focuses on broad social-political and environmental issues at the regional, national, and global levels, as well as the policy planning required to meet these issues within an interdisciplinary context. The globalization concentration provides training for students planning to work in green industry, government, NGOs, and environmental organizations. In addition, the track prepares students to earn graduate degrees in planning, public management, policy studies, or other applied social sciences with a global emphasis.

GSS Globalization, Environment, and Policy Concentration
Preliminary Core (Complete all 3 courses)
GEOG 141The Natural Environment4
GEOG 142Human Geography4
PS 297Introduction to Environmental Politics4
Methods Requirement (Complete one of the following courses)4
Social Science Inquiry and Research
Policy and Planning Analysis
Thinking Like a Social Scientist
Research Methods
Breadth Requirements (Complete two courses from the following list)8
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics
Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences
Perspectives on International Development
Value Systems in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Culture, Capitalism, and Globalization
Global Environmental Issues and Alternatives
Introduction to Global Environmental History
Media and Society
Languages of the World
Introduction to Public Policy
Healthy Communities
Introduction to International Relations
Specialization Requirements
Must complete 6 of the following courses:
Exploring Other Cultures: [Topic]
Immigration and Farmworkers Political Culture
Politics, Ethnicity, Nationalism
Resource and Environmental Economic Issues
Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources
Environmental Issues: [Topic]
Environmental Leadership: [Topic]
Environmental Justice
Political Ecology
Climatology
Geomorphology
Biogeography
Population and Environment
Geography of Globalization
Experimental Course: [Topic]
Hydrology and Water Resources
Long-Term Environmental Change
Political Geography
Tourism and Development
Environmental Alteration
Geography, Law, and the Environment
International Water Policy
Islam and Global Forces
Africa Today: Issues and Concerns
International Cooperation and Conflict
International Human Rights
Gender and International Development
Development and the Muslim World
Global Food Security
Indigenous Cultural Survival
Childhood in Cross-Cultural Perspective
South Asia: Development and Social Change
Development and Social Change in Southeast Asia
Development and Social Change in Latin America
Advanced World History: [Topic]
American Environmental History: [Topic]
Gender, Media, and Diversity
Principles of Public Relations
International Communication
Issues in International Communication: [Topic]
Experimental Course: [Topic]
Environmental Philosophy
Environmental Management
Seminar: [Topic]
Workshop: [Topic]
States' Rights (and Wrongs)
Democracy, Dictators, and Development
International Organization
Governments and Politics in Latin America
The Politics of Development
Science and Politics of Climate Change
Gender and Politics in Developing Countries
Intergenerational Justice
International Environmental Politics
Community, Environment, and Society
Issues in Environmental Sociology [Topic]
Decolonial Feminisms
Gender, Environment, and Development

*ENVS 335 and EC 333 cover much of the same material.  Students are discouraged from taking both.
**Topic course is subject to title change; only specific titles approved. Contact GSS director for approval.

Students must complete 48 credits with a minimum of 24 upper division credits within the major.

Courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A maximum of one course with a grade of ‘P’ or ‘P*’ may be used.

Double Dipping Policy
GSS will accept a maximum of 3 courses that overlap (“double-dip”) with another major, or 1 course that overlaps with a minor. Please note that degree guide may not reflect the double-dipping policy and it will be the responsibility of the student to ensure they are meeting the requirements. For additional information, meet with
an advisor (see Advising).

Undergraduate Studies

The program has four concentrations or tracks. Each concentration has its own set of core courses and then provides a number of elective courses from various departments. Major requirements for each of the four concentrations may be found on the program website.

Social Studies Teaching

This track prepares students with the course requirements for admission to the graduate teacher licensure program at the University of Oregon—UO Teach. This concentration does not, in and of itself, lead to a teaching license; rather, it provides well-defined content so that students are prepared to enroll in a graduate program to become licensed to teach social studies at the middle or high school level.

General social science majors are encouraged to consult with their advisors at least once a year to ensure their remaining course work is structured to meet all the requirements for the major. Students should notify the General Social Science Program office of their intention to graduate at least one term before the proposed graduation date.

GSS Social Studies Teaching Concentration
Preliminary Core
1) World History, Geography, Sociology, Psychology and Anthropology
Choose any 2 of the following courses:
ANTH 150World Archaeology4
ANTH 161Introduction to Cultural Anthropology4
GEOG 201World Regional Geography4
GEOG 202Geography of Europe4
GEOG 208Geography of the United States and Canada4
GEOG 209Geography of the Middle East and North Africa4
HIST 101Ancient Mediterranean4
HIST 102Making Modern Europe4
HIST 103Europe and the World4
HIST 104World History4
HIST 105World History4
HIST 106World History4
PSY 201Mind and Brain4
PSY 202Mind and Society4
SOC 204Introduction to Sociology4
SOC 207Social Inequality4
2) European and World History
Choose any 2 of the following courses 1
European History
Ancient Mediterranean
Making Modern Europe
Europe and the World
Modern Europe
Modern Europe
Modern Europe
Early Middle Ages in Europe
High Middle Ages in Europe
Late Middle Ages in Europe
British History: [Topic]
France
France
German History: [Topic]
399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director
World History
World History
World History
World History
Precolonial Africa
Imperial Russia
Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia
Latin America
Latin America
Latin America, 1910 to the Present
India
Early China
399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director
3) US History
Choose any 3 of the following courses:12
Inventing America
Building the United States
American Century
History of Women in the United States I
History of Women in the United States II
American Radicalism
The United States in the 1960s
American Business History
Vietnam War and the United States
H399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director
4) Economics8
Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics
Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics
5) Government and Political Science
Must take 2 of the following courses:8
United States Politics
Ethics, Identity, and Power
States' Rights (and Wrongs)
Democracy, Dictators, and Development
United States Political Thought
Political Ideologies
Political Power, Influence, and Control
Women and Politics
United States Social Movements and Political Change
6) Research Methods Requirement
Complete one of the following courses:4
Social Science Inquiry and Research
Policy and Planning Analysis
Thinking Like a Social Scientist
Research Methods
7) Specialization and Upper-Division Requirements
Must take at least one course from each of the following three areas: US History, Economics, and Political Science. 2
Anthropology (ANTH)
Exploring Other Cultures: [Topic]
Gender, Folklore, Inequality
Native North Americans
Anthropology of the United States
Caribbean Societies
Immigration and Farmworkers Political Culture
Hunters and Gatherers
Cultures of India and South Asia
Fundamentals of Archaeology
Pacific Islands Archaeology
Oregon Archaeology
Food and Culture
Politics, Ethnicity, Nationalism
Jewish Folklore and Ethnology
Native South Americans
Northwest Coast Archaeology
North American Archaeology
Gender and Archaeology
Foundations of Social Theory
Economics (EC)
Introduction to Game Theory
Urban and Regional Economic Problems
Resource and Environmental Economic Issues
Issues in Public Economics
Labor Market Issues
Issues in Industrial Organization
Money and Banking
International Economic Issues
Problems and Issues in the Developing Economies
Geography (GEOG)
Population and Environment
Geography of Globalization
Society, Culture, and Place
Political Geography
Urban Geography
Culture, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Environmental Alteration
Geography, Law, and the Environment
Environment and Development
North American Historical Landscapes
Global Studies (GLBL)
Africa Today: Issues and Concerns
Special Studies: [Topic]
Gender and International Development
Aid to Developing Countries
Development and the Muslim World
Childhood in Cross-Cultural Perspective
South Asia: Development and Social Change
Development and Social Change in Southeast Asia
Development and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa
Development and Social Change in Latin America
US History (HIST)
History of Women in the United States I
History of Women in the United States II
American Radicalism
American Radicalism
The United States in the 1960s
Vietnam War and the United States
Race and Ethnicity in the American West
Colonial American History
Revolutionary America
19th-Century United States: [Topic]
American Economic History: [Topic]
The American West
The Pacific Northwest
American Indian History: [Topic]
American Environmental History: [Topic]
Non-US History (HIST)
Early Middle Ages in Europe
High Middle Ages in Europe
Late Middle Ages in Europe
Precolonial Africa
Colonial and Postcolonial Africa
British History: [Topic]
France
German History: [Topic]
Early Russia
Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia
Latin America
Latin America
Latin America, 1910 to the Present
India
Early China
Samurai in Film
Ancient Greece: [Topic]
Ancient Rome: [Topic]
Advanced World History: [Topic]
Advanced Women's History: [Topic]
Society and Culture in Modern Africa: [Topic]
African Regional Histories: [Topic]
The Idea of Europe
Economic History of Modern Europe: [Topic]
Intellectual History of Modern Europe: [Topic]
Europe in the 20th Century: [Topic]
16th-Century European Reformations
Modern Germany: [Topic]
Mexico
Aztecs and Incas
Latin America: [Topic]
China: [Topic]
Japan: [Topic]
Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan
Early Japanese Culture and Society: [Topic]
Political Science (PS)
States' Rights (and Wrongs)
Democracy, Dictators, and Development
United States Political Thought
Political Ideologies
Roots of Democracy
Sovereignty and Revolution
Shadows of Modernity
International Organization
European Politics
United States Foreign Policy I
The Politics of Development
International Political Economy
Politics of China
Terrorism and Weapons Proliferation
Political Power, Influence, and Control
Women and Politics
Mass Media and American Politics
Politics and Film
Political Parties and Elections
Oregon Government and Politics
United States Congress
Games in Politics
United States Social Movements and Political Change
Marxism and Radical Thought
Causes and Prevention of War
Racial Politics in the United States
Theories of International Politics
The United States Presidency
Constitutional Law
Politics of the European Union
International Environmental Politics
U.S. Interventions in Developing Nations
Introduction to Rational Choice
United States Supreme Court
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
Politics of Everyday Life
Psychology (PSY)
Biopsychology
Developmental Psychology
Music and the Brain
Culture and Mental Health
Psychology of Gender
Psychoactive Drugs
Human Sexuality
Sociology (SOC)
American Society
Community, Environment, and Society
Social Theory
Social Issues and Movements
Sociology of the Mass Media
Self and Society
Sociology of the Family
Race and Ethnicity
Work and Occupations
Sociology of Gender
Introduction: Deviance, Control, and Crime
Recommended Courses 3

Requirements

Students must complete 68 credits with a minimum of 40 upper division credits within the major.

Courses subject to change as UOTeach/Oregon/National Content standards change.

Courses cannot overlap between sections (i.e., section 1 & 2 or section 2 & 6, etc.).

Courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A maximum of one course with a grade of ‘P’ or ‘P*’ may be used.

Double Dipping Policy
GSS will accept a maximum of 3 courses that overlap (“double-dip”) with another major, or 1 course that overlaps with a minor. Please note that degree guide may not reflect the double-dipping policy and it will be the responsibility of the student to ensure they are meeting the requirements. For additional information, meet with
an advisor.