Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies

https://ethnicstudies.uoregon.edu/

Brian Klopotek, Department Head 
541-346-0900
541-346-0904 fax
104 Alder Building
5268 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-5268

IRES classes examine the construction and context of indigeneity, race, and ethnicity in the United States, highlighting the histories, experiences, and movements of people of color and Indigenous peoples in the Americas. As elements of identity that cut across disciplinary categories, indigeneity, race, and ethnicity require a mode of study that draws on the humanities and the social sciences as well as interdisciplinary sources such as cultural studies. 

IRES scholars investigate race and racism alongside settler colonialism and other historical and contemporary manifestations of white supremacy and domination, analyzing how such systems of domination have created, and continue to create, social injustice. While the social construction of race in the United States is at the center of traditional ethnic studies, it is impossible to discuss racial dynamics without also paying significant attention to issues of gender, class, sexuality, indigeneity, immigration, transnational migration, and the diasporic formations resulting from the slave trade, indentured labor, colonialism, postcolonialism, imperialism, and globalization.  

IRES courses that satisfy university general-education requirements are listed under Group Requirements and Multicultural Requirement in the Bachelor's Degree Requirements section of this catalog. 

Faculty

Charise L. Cheney, associate professor (African American popular and political cultures; Black nationalist ideologies and practices; gender and sexuality). BSJ, 1993, Northwestern; PhD, 1999, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2009)

Courtney M. Cox, assistant professor (Race and Sport, cultural, political and economic effects of global sport, advanced analytics in sport). BJ, 2008, University of Texas at Austin; MA, 2013, University of Texas at Austin; MA, 2017, University of Southern California; PhD, 2019, University of Southern California. (2019)

Lynn H. Fujiwara, associate professor (women of color, Asian American studies, labor). BA, 1990, California, San Diego; MA, 1993, PhD, 1999, California, Santa Cruz. (2000)

Michael Hames-García, professor (policing and mass incarceration; literary and cultural studies; politics of identity). BA, 1993, Willamette; PhD, 1998, Cornell. (2005) 

Brian Klopotek, associate professor (federal recognition of Indian tribes, Native American education, environmentalism). BA, 1994, Yale; PhD, 2004, Minnesota, Twin Cities. (2003) 

Sharon Luk, associate professor (racism and racial capitalism, ethnic ontologies, epistemology). BA, 2001, Brown; MA, 2008, PhD, 2012, Southern California. (2014)

Ernesto J. Martínez, associate professor (comparative ethnic studies, queer studies, feminist theory). BA, 1998, Stanford; MA, 2003, PhD, 2005, Cornell. (2006)

Jennifer R. O'Neal, acting assistant professor (Native American and Indigenous history, American West history, decolonizing methodologies, cultural heritage archives, traditional knowledge systems, digital humanities). BS, 1999, Utah State University; MA, 2002, Utah State University; MA, 2003, University of Arizona; (ABD) PhD, 2019, Georgetown University. (2019)

Laura Pulido, professor (critical human geography, environmental justice, Chicano studies). BA, 1984, California State, Fresno; MA, 1987, Wisconsin, Madison; PhD, 1991, California, Los Angeles. (2016)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Students may earn a major or minor in ethnic studies. One learning outcome of the program is to raise student awareness of the racial, ethnic and political dimensions and applications of other major fields. As such, students of literature, social sciences, education, urban planning, art history, humanities, and international studies—to name only a few—find that related ethnic studies courses can enrich their academic programs.

Upper-division courses with related subject matter offered in other departments may be included in an ethnic studies major or minor program by arrangement with the IRES Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Specific details and course approvals must be obtained from the Department of Ethnic Studies.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Lower Division
ES 101Introduction to Ethnic Studies4
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to African American Studies
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Introduction to Chicano and Latino Studies
Introduction to Native American Studies
Introduction to Pacific Islander Studies
Additional 100- or 200-level course4
Upper Division
ES 301Theoretical Perspectives in Ethnic Studies4
Two 400-level courses8
Six additional 300- or 400-level courses24
Total Credits48

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Lower Division
ES 101Introduction to Ethnic Studies4
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to African American Studies
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Introduction to Chicano and Latino Studies
Introduction to Native American Studies
Introduction to Pacific Islander Studies
Additional 100- or 200-level course4
Upper Division
ES 301Theoretical Perspectives in Ethnic Studies4
Two 400-level courses8
Six additional 300- or 400-level courses24
Total Credits48

Majors must construct their programs in consultation with an ethnic studies advisor. At least 24 of the required upper-division credits must be taken in residence at the University of Oregon. Courses applied to the major must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of mid-C or better. Majors must maintain a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses applied to the major. Students majoring in ethnic studies may apply credits in Research: [Topic] (ES 401) and Reading and Conference: [Topic] (ES 405) toward their degree only if completed with letter grades of mid-C or better. Practicum: [Topic] (ES 409) may be applied toward the major on a graded or pass/no pass basis.

Minor in Ethnic Studies

Lower Division
ES 101Introduction to Ethnic Studies4
Two 200-level courses with ES subject code8
Upper Division
Four approved courses, including two with ES subject code16
Total Credits28

Upper-division courses must be taken in residence at the University of Oregon. The minor program must be planned in consultation with an ethnic studies advisor at least two terms before graduation. Courses applied to the minor must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of mid-C or better. Students minoring in ethnic studies may apply credits in Research: [Topic] (ES 401) and Reading and Conference: [Topic] (ES 405) only if completed with letter grades of mid-C or better. Credits in Practicum: [Topic] (ES 409) may be applied toward the minor on a graded or pass/no pass basis.

 

Minor in Latinx Studies

The Latinx Studies Minor will require a broad introduction to the study of race and ethnicity in the United States as well as a focused introduction to the study of Latinx peoples in the United States.

ES 101Introduction to Ethnic Studies4
At least one of the following courses:
Introduction to Chicano and Latino Literature
Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies
Latinos in the Americas
Latino Heritage I
Latino Heritage II
At least one qualifying course from any of the following humanities subjects: 1
Introduction to Chicano and Latino Literature
Chicano and Latino Writers
Introduction to Bilingualism
Latino Heritage I
Latino Heritage II
Cultura y lengua: comunidades bilingues
Spanish in the Media
United States Latino Literature and Culture
Spanish in the United States
National Identities and Border Cultures in the Americas
Multicultural Theater: [Topic]
At least one qualifying course from any of the following professional subjects: 1
Inclusive Urbanism
School and Representation in Media
Immigration, Diaspora and Education
Latino Roots I
Latino Roots II
Issues in International Communication: [Topic]
American Ethnic and Protest Music
Music of the Americas
Regional Ethnomusicology: [Topic]
At least one qualifying course from any of the following social science subjects:
Immigration and Farmworkers Political Culture
Latino Roots I
Latino Roots II
Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies
Race and Popular Culture: [Topic]
Caribbean Literature and Politics
Music, Politics, and Race
Environmental Racism
Race, Ethnicity, and Cinema: [Topic]
Race, Migration, and Rights
Race, Literature, and Culture: [Topic]
Race and Ethnicity and the Law: [Topic]
Race, Culture, Empire: [Topic]
Latinos in the Americas
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity: [Topic]
Gender, Literature, and Culture
Gender and Popular Culture
Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture
Literature as Feminist Theory
Total Credits: 224

At least 16 credits must be completed for a letter grade and passed with a mid-C or better to count toward the minor. Coursework must include 12 upper-division credits and must represent a range of disciplinary and professional approaches to the subject of Latinx Studies. All 12 upper-division credits must be taken in residence. 

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ES 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ES 250
Introduction to African American Studies
or Introduction to Asian American Studies
or Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies
or Introduction to Native American Studies
or Introduction to Pacific Islander Studies
4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Multicultural course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Lower-division ethnic studies course 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
Multicultural course 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ES 301 Theoretical Perspectives in Ethnic Studies 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division course with an ES subject code 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Three elective courses 12
400-level ethnic studies elective 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Three elective courses 12
400-level ethnic studies elective 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Bachelor of Science in Ethnic Studies

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ES 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
Mathematics course 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ES 250
Introduction to African American Studies
or Introduction to Asian American Studies
or Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies
or Introduction to Native American Studies
or Introduction to Pacific Islander Studies
4
Mathematics course 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Lower-division ethnic studies course 4
Mathematics course 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
Multicultural course 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
Multicultural course 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ES 301 Theoretical Perspectives in Ethnic Studies 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division ethnic studies course 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Three elective courses 12
400-level ethnic studies elective 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Three elective courses 12
400-level ethnic studies elective 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Graduate Certificate in Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies

The graduate Certificate in Ethnic Studies provides graduate students across campus the opportunity to enroll in a concentrated program of study centered on race, indigeneity, and intersectionality.

ES 615Theoretical Foundations in Ethnic Studies5
ES 623Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies: [Topic]5
ES 621Cultural Production: [Topic]5
ES 556History of Native American Education4
ES 540Race, Literature, and Culture: [Topic]4
ES 560Race, Culture, Empire: [Topic]4

This is an example of a Course of Study. The student here will take ES 615 as a required ES graduate core seminar, ES 623 as a required graduate substantive seminar, and ES 621, 556, 540, and 560 as their ES graduate electives. 

Here are a list of Graduate Seminars that students can choose from. This list does not include the graduate seminars taught by Graduate Faculty in other departments. 

ES 507Seminar: [Topic]1-5
ES 510Experimental Course: [Topic]1-5
ES 540Race, Literature, and Culture: [Topic]4
ES 542Caribbean Literature and Politics4
ES 550Race and Incarceration4
ES 552Race and Ethnicity and the Law: [Topic]4
ES 556History of Native American Education4
ES 560Race, Culture, Empire: [Topic]4
ES 607Seminar: [Topic]1-5
ES 610Experimental Course: [Topic]1-5
ES 615Theoretical Foundations in Ethnic Studies5
ES 616Interdisciplinary Research Methods in Ethnic Studies5
ES 617Genealogies of Ethnic Studies5
ES 620Race, Space, and Power: [Topic]5
ES 621Cultural Production: [Topic]5
ES 622Resistance and Dissent: [Topic]5
ES 623Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies: [Topic]5

Courses

Course usage information

ES 101. Introduction to Ethnic Studies. 4 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the academic field of Ethnic Studies, the interdisciplinary, comparative and relational study of race, ethnicity and indigeneity in the United States. Special attention paid to how systems of domination and acts of resistance (re)create racial subjects.

Course usage information

ES 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: approval of program administrators.

Course usage information

ES 198. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable up to five times.

Course usage information

ES 200M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 4 Credits.

Course usage information

ES 224M. Introduction to Anthropology of the African Diaspora. 4 Credits.

Introduction to theoretical questions and methodological concerns framing an anthropology of the African Diaspora. Multilisted with ANTH 224M.

Course usage information

ES 250. Introduction to African American Studies. 4 Credits.

This course introduces students to the theoretical models used in the interdisciplinary study of African-America. Using a thematic approach, students will learn to critically engage the development of and dynamics between race, racism and blackness in the United States.

Course usage information

ES 252. Introduction to Asian American Studies. 4 Credits.

Focuses on historical, cultural, and social issues in Asian America and surveys scholarship in Asian American studies.

Course usage information

ES 254. Introduction to Chicanx and Latinx Studies. 4 Credits.

Focuses on historical, social, and cultural issues in Chicanx and Latinx communities and surveys scholarship in Chicanx and Latinx studies.

Course usage information

ES 256. Introduction to Native American Studies. 4 Credits.

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding Native American lives, examining Native American identities, practices, histories, creative works, cultures, and political status in context.

Course usage information

ES 258. Introduction to Pacific Islander Studies. 4 Credits.

Focuses on historical, social, and cultural issues in Pacific Islander communities and surveys scholarship in Pacific Island Studies.

Course usage information

ES 301. Theoretical Perspectives in Ethnic Studies. 4 Credits.

Introduction to contemporary theoretical frameworks in the discipline of ethnic studies. Offered fall term only.
Prereq: ES 101; one from ES 250, 252, 254, or 256.

Course usage information

ES 310. Race and Popular Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines the interface between race and popular culture, surveying the historical development, political significance, and social influence ofpopular culture in the United States. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credits when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 321. Indigenous Peoples of Oregon. 4 Credits.

This course examines the history, culture, social and political issues of the Indigenous peoples of Oregon through oral traditions, primary sources, and secondary sources, focused on the major themes of sovereignty, traditional knowledge, and decolonization.

Course usage information

ES 330. Women of Color: Issues and Concerns. 4 Credits.

Contemporary social issues and feminism among women of color in the United States.
Prereq: ES 101 recommended.

Course usage information

ES 345M. Music, Politics, and Race. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of musical forms and their relationship to histories of racial and social justice, inequality, and political movements. Offered alternate years. Multilisted with MUS 345M.

Course usage information

ES 350. Native Americans and the Environment. 4 Credits.

Critical issues in Native American environmentalism.

Course usage information

ES 352. Social Equity and Criminal Justice. 4 Credits.

Critical issues related to police, prisons, criminal justice, and racial and gender inequalities.

Course usage information

ES 354. Environmental Racism. 4 Credits.

Explores environmental justice as both a field of scholarship and organizing framework that links power, justice, and inequality to environmental issues. Special attention is given to the specific forms of racism which produce environmental injustice.

Course usage information

ES 360. Black Sexual Politics. 4 Credits.

Explores the gender and sexuality politics that influence the social, political, economic and cultural development of black communities in the diaspora, including the United States.

Course usage information

ES 370. Race, Ethnicity, and Cinema: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines the history and politics of race, ethnicity, and indigenousness in relation to film, including questions of production, distribution, and reception in the United States. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credits when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 380. Race, Migration, and Rights. 4 Credits.

Examines historical and contemporary politics in race, immigration, and migration.

Course usage information

ES 385. Critical Whiteness Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

This course explores the social construction of race by investigating and historicizing “whiteness” as a racial category in the U.S. Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits.
Prereq: ES 101 or one 200 level ES course.

Course usage information

ES 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Recent topics include Caribbean Migrations; Asian American Women; Critical Whiteness Studies; Native Americans and Film; Asian Diasporas; Race and Resistance in United States History. Repeatable up to 5 times.

Course usage information

ES 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: majors or minors only.

Course usage information

ES 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: majors or minors only.

Course usage information

ES 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: majors or minors only.

Course usage information

ES 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 440. Race, Literature, and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines race, literature, and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credits when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 442. Caribbean Literature and Politics. 4 Credits.

Discusses how Caribbean diaspora literature employs themes of colonialism, sexuality, racism, migration, state violence, nationalism, and identity.

Course usage information

ES 450. Race and Incarceration. 4 Credits.

Introduces several key questions necessary for understanding the crisis of prisons and incarceration in the United States, with an emphasis on race, gender, and class.

Course usage information

ES 452. Race and Ethnicity and the Law: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Addresses issues of social justice and the participation of Asian Americans, African Americans, Chicanos and Latinos, and Native Americans in the legal system. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ES 456. History of Native American Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the historical conflict between traditional culture and knowledge transmission among Native Americans and the assimilationist educational system and practices of Euro-American culture. Offered alternative years.

Course usage information

ES 460. Race, Culture, Empire: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines how racial discourses have informed United States domestic and foreign policy, with special attention on cultural representations of U.S. colonialism and imperialism. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credits when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 464. Relational Studies of Indigeneity, Race and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Seminar centers relation between Indigenous peoples and peoples of color instead of focusing on white/non-white line. Called comparative or relational studies, the approach yields unique insights into how race and settler-colonialism work in the United States and beyond.

Course usage information

ES 465. Feminist Theories of Race: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on the political and theoretical trajectory of feminist and race theories associated with particular groups, such as Asian American feminisms, or comparatively in relation to Women of Color and queer politics.Repeatable up to 3 times for a maximum of 16 credits when topic changes.

Course usage information

ES 466. Native American Ethnohistory. 4 Credits.

In this seminar, we read, evaluate, analyze, and critique major texts in Native American ethnohistory (a combination of anthropological and historical methods) with a focus on perspectives and concerns of contemporary Indigenous peoples.

Course usage information

ES 468. Indigenous Research Methods and Ethics. 4 Credits.

This course addresses methodological and ethical issues related to conducting research about and with Indigenous peoples. The course introduces students to the principles of Indigenous research, including practices, collaboration, ethics, and Indigenous approaches to the construction of knowledge.
Prereq: ES 256.

Course usage information

ES 470. Native American and Indigenous Feminisms. 4 Credits.

This class will acquaint students with critical issues in Native American and Indigenous feminisms. We will review past and present struggles, including gendered violence, cultural systems of gender and sexuality, successes and failures in efforts towards alliance, life stories, film, and literature, in comparative perspective.

Course usage information

ES 498. Interdisciplinary Research Methods. 4 Credits.

Prepares majors for independent research in ethnic studies. Examines interdisciplinary methods for research on race and ethnicity. Offered winter term only.
Prereq: completion of required courses for ethnic studies major, except ES 499; majors or minors only.

Course usage information

ES 499. Ethnic Studies Proseminar. 4 Credits.

Capstone seminar. Focuses on concluding work and experience in ethnic studies through independent research, preparation and presentation of research paper. Offered spring term only.
Prereq: ES 498; majors only.

Course usage information

ES 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 540. Race, Literature, and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines race, literature, and culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credtis when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 542. Caribbean Literature and Politics. 4 Credits.

Discusses how Caribbean diaspora literature employs themes of colonialism, sexuality, racism, migration, state violence, nationalism, and identity.

Course usage information

ES 550. Race and Incarceration. 4 Credits.

Introduces several key questions necessary for understanding the crisis of prisons and incarceration in the United States, with an emphasis on race, gender, and class.

Course usage information

ES 552. Race and Ethnicity and the Law: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Addresses issues of social justice and the participation of Asian Americans, African Americans, Chicanos and Latinos, and Native Americans in the legal system. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ES 556. History of Native American Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the historical conflict between traditional culture and knowledge transmission among Native Americans and the assimilationist educational system and practices of Euro-American culture. Offered alternative years.

Course usage information

ES 560. Race, Culture, Empire: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines how racial discourses have informed United States domestic and foreign policy, with special attention on cultural representations of U.S. colonialism and imperialism. Repeatable four times for a maximum of 20 credits when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ES 564. Relational Studies of Indigeneity, Race and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Seminar centers relation between Indigenous peoples and peoples of color instead of focusing on white/non-white line. Called comparative or relational studies, the approach yields unique insights into how race and settler-colonialism work in the United States and beyond.

Course usage information

ES 565. Feminist Theories of Race: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on the political and theoretical trajectory of feminist and race theories associated with particular groups, such as Asian American feminisms, or comparatively in relation to Women of Color and queer politics.Repeatable three times for a maximum of 16 credits when topic changes.

Course usage information

ES 566. Native American Ethnohistory. 4 Credits.

In this seminar, we read, evaluate, analyze, and critique major texts in Native American ethnohistory (a combination of anthropological and historical methods) with a focus on perspectives and concerns of contemporary Indigenous peoples.

Course usage information

ES 568. Indigenous Research Methods and Ethics. 4 Credits.

This course addresses methodological and ethical issues related to conducting research about and with Indigenous peoples. The course introduces students to the principles of Indigenous research, including practices, collaboration, ethics, and Indigenous approaches to the construction of knowledge.

Course usage information

ES 570. Native American and Indigenous Feminisms. 4 Credits.

This class will acquaint students with critical issues in Native American and Indigenous feminisms. We will review past and present struggles, including gendered violence, cultural systems of gender and sexuality, successes and failures in efforts towards alliance, life stories, film, and literature, in comparative perspective.

Course usage information

ES 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable for a maximum of 10 credits.

Course usage information

ES 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ES 614. Colloquium: Professional Development. 1 Credit.

Professional development, teaching skills, and mentorship for first year Ethnic Studies PhD students. Repeatable twice for a total of three credits.

Course usage information

ES 615. Theoretical Foundations in Ethnic Studies. 5 Credits.

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and debates in Ethnic Studies scholarship.

Course usage information

ES 616. Interdisciplinary Research Methods in Ethnic Studies. 5 Credits.

Introduction to interdisciplinary methodologies in the various fields of ethnic studies, with an eye towards developing interdisciplinary competence and students applying it to their own work.

Course usage information

ES 617. Genealogies of Ethnic Studies. 5 Credits.

Examines the emergence and evolution of the discipline of Ethnic Studies, including major intellectual shifts in the field, particularly as they relate to changes in the social science and humanities; and the state of the discipline today.

Course usage information

ES 620. Race, Space, and Power: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

This course questions the variety of ways that social constructions of race and space are inextricable from one another and constitute, as much as they are constituted by, modern power relations. Repeatable once for a maximum of 10 credits.

Course usage information

ES 621. Cultural Production: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Graduate introduction to the theories and methods utilized within Cultural Studies scholarship with attention to race, gender, nation, sexuality and indigeneity. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 15 credits.

Course usage information

ES 622. Resistance and Dissent: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Surveys historical and contemporary methods people of color have used to subvert and challenge white power and privilege in the United States. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 15 credits.

Course usage information

ES 623. Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

This course closely examines the ways in which race is deeply intertwined with gender and sexuality in the production of racial, gender, and sexual violence since the inception of European settler colonialism in the Americas. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 15 credits.