Environmental Studies

http://envs.uoregon.edu

Mark Carey, Program Director
541-346-5257
144 Columbia Hall
5223 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-5223

Environmental Studies crosses the boundaries of traditional disciplines in the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, management, policy, design, and law. It challenges students to look at the relationship between humans and their environment from new perspectives. The Environmental Studies Program is dedicated to gaining greater understanding of the natural world from an ecological perspective; devising policies and behaviors that address contemporary environmental problems; and promoting a rethinking of basic cultural premises, ways of structuring knowledge, and the root metaphors of contemporary society.

The Environmental Studies Program offers two undergraduate majors (Environmental Studies and Environmental Science), three undergraduate minors (Environmental Studies,Environmental Humanities, and Food Studies), Master’s and Doctoral degrees. It also houses several high-profile interdisciplinary centers, programs and initiatives including the Center for Environmental Futures, Tribal Climate Change Project, Environmental Leadership Program, Just Futures Institute for Racial and Climate Justice, and Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Initiative.

 
 

Faculty

With 29 core faculty from three colleges and 17 different departments, the Environmental Studies Program is doing exciting boundary-breaking interdisciplinary research and teaching related to the environment. In addition, over 100 faculty from all UO colleges who have environmental expertise are affiliated with Environmental Studies as participating faculty. Profiles for core faculty and a list of participating faculty are on the Environmental Studies website.  

Stacy Alaimo, professor (material ecocriticism, anthropocene feminisms, blue humanities). 

Brendan J. M. Bohannan, professor (microbial ecology). 

Peg Boulay, senior instructor II (environmental monitoring, wildlife conservation, outreach and education); co-director, environmental leadership.

Scott D. Bridgham, professor (ecosystem ecology, climate change). 

Trudy Ann Cameron, professor (environmental economics). 

Mark Carey, professor (glaciers, climate change, natural disasters); director, environmental studies program. 

Lauren Hallett, assistant professor (plant community and restoration ecology).

Stephanie LeMenager, professor (American studies, environmental humanities).

Kathryn Lynch, senior instructor II (environmental education, environmental anthropology); co-director, environmental leadership. 

Kathy Lynn, research associate  (Tribal Climate Change Project).

Richard D. Margerum, associate professor (collaborative environmental management, conflict management in multistakeholder processes).

Galen Martin, senior instructor II (sustainable agriculture, food systems).

Patricia McDowell, professor (river management and restoration).

Krista McGuire, professor (microbial ecology, sustainable management). 

Ronald  Mitchell, professor (environmental politics, international relations), assistant director of environmental studies program.  

Erin Moore, associate professor (life-cycle environmental impacts)

Nicolae Morar, associate professor (applied ethics, recent continental philosophy, philosophy of biology).

Barbara Muraca, assistant professor (human-nature relationships, ecosystem services valuation, sustainability theory). 

Kari Norgaard, professor (environmental justice, climate-change denial), director of graduate studies.

Alexandra Rempel, assistant professor (environmental design, passive heating and cooling).

Joshua J. Roering, associate professor (geomorphology, landscape evolution modeling). 

Kory Russel, assistant professor (sustainable design; water, public health, and environment). 

Emily Scott, assistant professor (art and the public sphere, critical approaches to the built environment, visual cultures of nature). 

Lucas Silva, assistant professor (terrestrial ecology, biogeochemistry, biogeography). 

David Sutherland, associate  professor (ice-ocean interaction, coastal and estuarine oceanography). 

Sarah Wald, associate professor (race and ethnic studies, environmental humanities).

Peter A. Walker, professor (environmental politics, political ecology). 

Marsha Weisiger, associate professor (environmental, Native American, American West). 

Richard York, associate professor (assessing anthropogenic driving forces of global environmental change).

Emeritus

Alan Dickman, professor emeritus (forest ecology and management).

Matthew Dennis, professor (colonial and early national America, American cultural and environmental history, American Indian history).

 

The program offers two majors. The Environmental Studies major focuses on social sciences, policy studies, the humanities, and sustainable design and practice. It is designed for students who are interested in such areas as environmental policy, planning, ethics or philosophy, ecocriticism, environmental justice, sustainable development, international environmental issues, or social theory and the environment.

The Environmental Science major is designed for students who want to focus on scientific careers in conservation biology, climate science, pollution prevention and abatement, or ecosystem protection, restoration, and management.

You can obtain a bachelor of arts (BA) or a bachelor of science (BS) in both of these majors. 

We also offer a minor in Environmental Studies, Environmental Humanities or Food Studies. 

Both majors provide a broad, solid, interdisciplinary perspective on the relationship between humans and nature. Their goals are to develop awareness of environmental issues and to develop an understanding of the nature and scope of the forces underlying environmental problems, the various approaches used to bring environmental problems to the public’s attention, and the methods and approaches used to solve these problems.

Majors gain an appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of environmental studies, and they master content and skills associated with a number of different disciplines.

Majors and minors have considerable latitude in designing a course of study that combines theory and practice, invites active participation, and fits specific interests, needs, and aptitudes. The majors, which provide a well-rounded basic education, prepare students for entry-level positions in business, government, non-governmental and nonprofit organizations, and for a variety of graduate and professional degree programs. Students are encouraged to take advantage of career planning services offered by the University Career Center.

Students should plan their programs early in their undergraduate careers with the aid of a Tykeson advisor in the Scientific Discover and Sustainability (SDS) flight path. Majors are encouraged to consider completing a second major or a minor in a related field. Visit the Tykeson College and Career Advising homepage to find out how to schedule an appointment with an advisor. 

Up-to-date information, major requirements sheets, and tip sheets are available in the program office and on the website.

Opportunities for Majors

The Environmental Studies Program offers many hands-on learning experiences for students to apply their academic learning while developing as professionals and scholars.

Environmental Leadership Program

The Environmental Leadership Program is an interdisciplinary community-based learning program. Student teams work with non-profit organizations, governmental agencies and businesses to address local environmental needs. Through unique and practical learning experiences, undergraduate students gain leadership, communication, collaboration and professional skills by engaging directly in applied problem-resolution while providing valuable assistance to our community partners. Depending on the project, students earn 4-8 credits that count towards the environmental studies and environmental science major requirements as well as the environmental studies minor.

Internships

By offering academic credit for environmentally focused work experience, the internship program allows students to connect their academic studies with practical applications. Potential internship sponsors include non-profit organizations, governmental agencies and businesses. Students are expected to be self-motivated and arrange their own positions in their areas of particular interest. However, if a student needs assistance finding an internship position, the internship coordinator can help identify potential opportunities related to the student’s interests and professional goal. Students may take up to 12 credits of Internship: [Topic] (ENVS 404). To fulfill the practical learning experience requirement for the environmental studies and environmental science majors, students take 4 credits (which translates to 120 hours) of internship service.

Honors

Students majoring in Environmental Studies and Environmental Science are encouraged to participate in our honors program. Writing a senior thesis is good preparation for future professional positions and graduate studies. It provides an opportunity to develop your research and writing skills. Graduating with honors demonstrates a high level of initiative and ability to work independently. An honors thesis is a way to become an expert on a topic of interest and gain recognition for your outstanding academic work.

Students who want to graduate with honors in environmental studies or environmental science must have a 3.30 overall grade point average (GPA) and a 3.50 GPA in courses required for the major. Honors candidates complete a research-based thesis or creative project conducted under the direction of a faculty adviser. Due to the breadth of potential research topics, students can do original laboratory or field-based research, library-based research, or a terminal or creative project.

Honors students who are not enrolled in the Clark Honors College must earn 4 credits of Research: [Topic] (ENVS 401) and 4 credits of Thesis (ENVS 403) in environmental studies or another appropriate department. These credits count towards environmental studies and environmental science major requirements.

Environmental Careers

The environmental studies and environmental science majors provide a well-rounded basic education to prepare students for entry-level positions in business, government, or non-governmental organizations. Alumni work in diverse fields including conservation, climate policy, political action, land use planning, public and environmental health, pollution prevention and abatement, sustainable design, sustainable agriculture and food systems, environmental justice, green business, and ecosystem protection, restoration, and management. Many alumni continue their education through graduate programs. 

Kindergarten through Secondary Teaching Careers

Students who complete a bachelor’s degree with a major in environmental studies or environmental science are eligible to apply for the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching or the fifth-year licensure program to become an elementary teacher. More information is available from the department’s undergraduate advisor; see also the College of Education section in this catalog.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science (Life Science Focus)

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
General-education course in arts and letters 4
CH 221 General Chemistry I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 121 College Composition I 4
CH 222 General Chemistry II 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
MATH 112 Elementary Functions 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities 4
CH 223 General Chemistry III 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
MATH 251
Calculus I
or Calculus for the Biological Sciences I
4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
MATH 252
Calculus II
or Calculus for the Biological Sciences II
4
BI 211 General Biology I: Cells 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences 4
BI 212 General Biology II: Organisms 4
MATH 425 Statistical Methods I 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
BI 213 General Biology III: Populations 4
ERTH 305 Dinosaurs 4
 Credits 16
Summer
ERTH 201 Dynamic Planet Earth 4
ERTH 202 Earth's Surface and Environment 4
ERTH 203 History of Life 4
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 60
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
PHIL 340 Environmental Philosophy 4
BI 370 Ecology 5
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 17
Winter
ANTH 362 Human Biological Variation 4
BI 357 Marine Biology 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
GEOG 341 Population and Environment 4
ENVS 335 Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 49
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BI 380 Evolution 4
Elective courses 8
ENVS 477 Soil Science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENVS 427 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring 4
BI 471 Population Ecology 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: [Topic] 4
BI 448 Field Botany 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (Life Science Focus)

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
General-education group-satisfying course 4
General-education course that also satisfies a international cultures multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 123 College Composition III 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
General-education courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities 4
MATH 112 Elementary Functions 4
General-education courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CH 221 General Chemistry I 4
ERTH 201 Dynamic Planet Earth 4
MATH 251 Calculus I 4
Multicultural course in international cultures 4
 Credits 16
Winter
CH 222 General Chemistry II 4
ERTH 202 Earth's Surface and Environment 4
MATH 252 Calculus II 4
BI 211 General Biology I: Cells 4
 Credits 16
Spring
General-education course 4
ERTH 203 History of Life 4
CH 223 General Chemistry III 4
BI 213 General Biology III: Populations 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
ANTH 330 Hunters and Gatherers 4
GEOG 341 Population and Environment 4
General-educationcourse 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ANTH 361 Human Evolution 4
ANTH 349 Origins of Art 4
BI 212 General Biology II: Organisms 4
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ANTH 462 Primate Evolution 4
ANTH 466 Primate Feeding and Nutrition 4
ARCH 430 Architectural Contexts: Place and Culture 4
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 404 Internship: [Topic] 4
BI 306 Pollination Biology 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
Winter
ENVS 411 Environmental Issues: [Topic] (Top Conservation Areas) 4
BI 307 Forest Biology 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
Spring
ENVS 429 Environmental Leadership: [Topic] 4
BI 374 Conservation Biology 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 36

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies (Policy and Social Science Focus)

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
General-education course that also satisfies international cultures multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
ERTH 201 Dynamic Planet Earth 4
SOC 312 Statistical Analysis in Sociology 4
General-education course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
ERTH 202 Earth's Surface and Environment 4
General-education course 4
General-education course that also satisfies international cultures multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence  
ERTH 203 History of Life 4
General-education courses 8
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 44
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ANTH 170 Introduction to Human Origins 4
GEOG 341 Population and Environment 4
PS 477 International Environmental Politics 4
General-education course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
GEOG 321 Climatology 4
LA 440 Introduction to Landscape Planning Analysis 4
PHIL 340 Environmental Philosophy 4
Course that satisfies minor requirements 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ES 350 Native Americans and the Environment 4
ERTH 304 The Fossil Record 4
Course that satisfies minor requirements 4
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 44
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EC 432 Economy of the Pacific Northwest 4
GLBL 425 Global Food Security 4
Course that satisfies minor requirements 4
 Credits 12
Winter
ENVS 411 Environmental Issues: [Topic] (Environmental Interpretation) 4
GLBL 446 Development and Social Change in Latin America 4
Course that satisfies minor requirements 4
 Credits 12
Spring
EC 330 Urban and Regional Economic Problems 4
ENVS 404 Internship: [Topic] 1-12
Course that satisfies minor requirements 4
 Credits 9-20
 Total Credits 33-44

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies (Humanities and Sustainable Design Focus)

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 201 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Multicultural course in international cultures 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENVS 202 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENVS 203 Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
Multicultural course in identity, pluralism, and tolerance 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CH 111 Introduction to Chemical Principles 4
MATH 112 Elementary Functions 4
GEOG 141 The Natural Environment 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
BI 211 General Biology I: Cells 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
BI 213 General Biology III: Populations 4
GEOG 341 Population and Environment 4
PS 367 Science and Politics of Climate Change 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics 4
PPPM 445 Green Cities 4
BI 357 Marine Biology 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENG 325 Literature of the Northwest 4
LA 390 Urban Farm 4
BI 307 Forest Biology 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
HIST 378 American Environmental History to 1890 4
ENVS 467 Sustainable Agriculture 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENVS 411 Environmental Issues: [Topic] 4
PHIL 309 Global Justice 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 12
Winter
ARCH 436 Theory of Urban Design I 3
Elective courses 8
 Credits 11
Spring
ENVS 404 Internship: [Topic] 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 35

The Environmental Studies Program offers graduate study leading to the degrees of master of arts (MA) or master of science (MS) in environmental studies, and an interdisciplinary doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in environmental sciences, studies, and policy.

Students choose courses offered in appropriate disciplines to design a course plan based on individual goals and backgrounds.

Some financial support for graduate students in the Environmental Studies Program is available through graduate teaching fellowships. Support generally consists of a stipend, health insurance, and a tuition waiver.

Application instructions and materials are available on the program’s website.

Application Deadline

Applicants for admission to the master’s program must submit all necessary materials online by January 15. New students are accepted for fall term only.

Concurrent Master’s Degrees Programs

Environmental studies students may obtain concurrent degrees in other disciplines. Applicants must apply separately to each program. For more information, contact the program office.

Courses

Course usage information

ENVS 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable three times for a maximum of 20 credits.

Course usage information

ENVS 198. Laboratory Projects: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 201. Introduction to Environmental Studies: Social Sciences. 4 Credits.

Contributions of the social sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include human population, the relationship between social institutions and environmental problems, and appropriate political, policy, and economic processes.

Course usage information

ENVS 202. Introduction to Environmental Studies: Natural Sciences. 4 Credits.

Contributions of the natural sciences to analysis of environmental problems. Topics include biological processes, ecological principles, chemical cycling, ecosystem characteristics, and natural system vulnerability and recovery.

Course usage information

ENVS 203. Introduction to Environmental Studies: Humanities. 4 Credits.

Contributions of the humanities and arts to understandings of the environment. Emphasis on diverse ways of thinking, writing, creating, and engaging in environmental discourse.

Course usage information

ENVS 225. Introduction to Food Studies. 4 Credits.

An exploration of the field of "food studies" and examination of the role of food in historical and contemporary life in the US and around the world.

Course usage information

ENVS 298. Temporary Group-Satisfying Course. 4 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENVS 335. Allocating Scarce Environmental Resources. 4 Credits.

Considerations for the design of environmental and natural resources policies and regulations: balancing society's preferences and the costs of environmental protection and resource conservation.
Prereq: MATH 105 or higher.

Course usage information

ENVS 345. Environmental Ethics. 4 Credits.

Key concepts and various moral views surveyed; includes anthropocentrism, individualism, ecocentrism, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Exploration includes case studies and theory.

Course usage information

ENVS 350. Ecological Footprint of Energy Generation. 4 Credits.

Detailed study of the ecological consequences of all forms of energy generation including fossil fuels and alternative energy sources. Open to environmental science, environmental studies, and planning, public policy and management majors only.
Prereq: ENVS 201, MATH 112.

Course usage information

ENVS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 400M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 403. Thesis. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable up to 5 times.

Course usage information

ENVS 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: Instructor's approval.

Course usage information

ENVS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 411. Environmental Issues: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

In depth examination of a particular environmental topic such as global warming, ecosystem restoration, energy alternatives, geothermal development, public lands management, or environmental literature. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: junior or senior standing.

Course usage information

ENVS 425. Environmental Education Theory and Practice. 4 Credits.

Learning theories, environmental literacy, and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of environmental education programs. Development of teaching materials in collaboration with a community partner for group project.
Prereq: instructor's approval.

Course usage information

ENVS 427. Environmental and Ecological Monitoring. 4 Credits.

Theory, design, and practice of monitoring sampling mapping, field techniques, data collection, management, analysis and presentation methods, local case studies.

Course usage information

ENVS 429. Environmental Leadership: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Partnering with governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools and local businesses, students develop service learning projects. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits when topic changes.
Prereq: instructor's approval.

Course usage information

ENVS 429L. Environmental Leadership: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Partnering with governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, public schools and local businesses, students develop service learning projects. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENVS 435. Environmental Justice. 4 Credits.

Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity.
Prereq: ENVS 201.

Course usage information

ENVS 450. Political Ecology. 4 Credits.

Examines how social relations and economic, social, and cultural control of natural resources shape human interactions with the environment. Theory and case studies.
Prereq: ENVS 201.

Course usage information

ENVS 455. Sustainability. 4 Credits.

Examines the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policymakers, environmentalists, and businesses.
Pre- or coreq: ENVS 201; junior or senior standing.

Course usage information

ENVS 465. Wetland Ecology and Management. 4 Credits.

Examines management, law, and policies related to wetlands in an ecological framework; includes wetland type definitions, classification, distribution, formation and development, and restoration.
Prereq: BI 307 or BI 370 or GEOG 360.

Course usage information

ENVS 467. Sustainable Agriculture. 4 Credits.

Examines sustainability issues in agricultural production and current food systems. Focuses on environmental aspects of seed, water, soil, energy, and pest management.
Prereq: ENVS 201 or 202.

Course usage information

ENVS 477. Soil Science. 4 Credits.

Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.
Prereq: CH 111 or 221 or 224H.

Course usage information

ENVS 493M. Passive Cooling. 4 Credits.

Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive cooling design and performance, including precedents, shading, natural ventilation, evaporative cooling, use of thermal mass, radiant cooling assisted by cold night skies, and control scheduling, supported by field investigations and introductory energy modeling. Multilisted with ARCH 493M.
Prereq: ARCH 491.

Course usage information

ENVS 494M. Passive Heating. 4 Credits.

Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive solar heating design and performance, including precedents, solar resource evaluation, glazing selection and orientation, thermal mass materials and positioning, movable insulation, and control scheduling, supported by solar site surveys and modeling in EnergyPlus. Multilisted with ARCH 494M.
Prereq: ARCH 491.

Course usage information

ENVS 500M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable up to eight times.

Course usage information

ENVS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 525. Environmental Education Theory and Practice. 4 Credits.

Learning theories, environmental literacy, and the planning, implementation, and evaluation of environmental education programs. Development of teaching materials in collaboration with a community partner for group project.

Course usage information

ENVS 535. Environmental Justice. 4 Credits.

Environmental justice and its impact on current decisions. Focus on civil rights law, perception of risk, and relation of sustainability and equity.

Course usage information

ENVS 550. Political Ecology. 4 Credits.

Examines how social relations and economic, social, and cultural control of natural resources shape human interactions with the environment. Theory and case studies.

Course usage information

ENVS 555. Sustainability. 4 Credits.

Examines the evolution of the concept of sustainability and its complex and sometimes problematic uses among scholars, policymakers, environmentalists, and businesses.

Course usage information

ENVS 565. Wetland Ecology and Management. 4 Credits.

Examines management, law, and policies related to wetlands in an ecological framework; includes wetland type definitions, classification, distribution, formation and development, and restoration.

Course usage information

ENVS 567. Sustainable Agriculture. 4 Credits.

Examines sustainability issues in agricultural production and current food systems. Focuses on environmental aspects of seed, water, soil, energy, and pest management.

Course usage information

ENVS 577. Soil Science. 4 Credits.

Chemical and physical characteristics and classification of soils, field soil identification, soil degradation.

Course usage information

ENVS 593M. Passive Cooling. 4 Credits.

Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive cooling design and performance, including precedents, shading, natural ventilation, evaporative cooling, use of thermal mass, radiant cooling assisted by cold night skies, and control scheduling, supported by field investigations and introductory energy modeling. Multilisted with ARCH 593M.
Prereq: ARCH 591.

Course usage information

ENVS 594M. Passive Heating. 4 Credits.

Conceptual and quantitative investigations of passive solar heating design and performance, including precedents, solar resource evaluation, glazing selection and orientation, thermal mass materials and positioning, movable insulation, and control scheduling, supported by solar site surveys and modeling in EnergyPlus. Multilisted with ARCH 594M.
Prereq: ARCH 591

Course usage information

ENVS 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable for maximum of 10 credits.

Course usage information

ENVS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable nine times.

Course usage information

ENVS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENVS 609. Terminal Project. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable up to eight times.

Course usage information

ENVS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Interdisciplinary Capstone Project.

Course usage information

ENVS 631. Environmental Studies Theory and Practice. 4 Credits.

Introduction to various disciplinary perspectives that contribute to environmental studies, including their research methods, vocabularies, and core concepts.

Course usage information

ENVS 632. Environmental Studies Research Methodology. 2 Credits.

Identifying a clear and concise research problem, developing methodology to address that problem, and the process of developing a thorough knowledge of relevant literature.

Course usage information

ENVS 633. Environmental Studies Thesis Development. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary readings in environmental studies focused on topics chosen by each student in consultation with instructor. Preparation for presentations at the Joint Campus Conference.