Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership

Charles R. Martinez Jr., Department Head
541-346-5171
102 Lorry I. Lokey Education Building

The curriculum leading to master’s and doctoral degrees in the Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership focus on developing and implementing effective practices in education and social system settings.

Programs provide educational leaders, policymakers, and researchers with the skills needed to design and implement strategies that improve practices in educational organizations. Graduates are qualified for a variety of positions such as education system administrators, principals and superintendents, instructors and researchers in higher education and nonprofit settings, specialists in intervention development, implementation, and evaluation, and researchers in evaluation, management, leadership, and educational policy.

License Programs

Administrator License Preparation

541-346-2447
102 Lorry I. Lokey Education Building

Oregon requires administrators in public schools (vice principals, principals, assistant superintendents, superintendents, and other designated personnel) to hold administrative licenses. The University of Oregon offers planned programs of study leading to the initial and continuing licenses for administrators and superintendents.

Initial Administrator License

The initial administrator licensure program prepares students for building and program administration and for initial school district superintendent assignments. The initial administrator license may be issued to an applicant who completes the 26-credit program, earned a master’s degree from an accredited college or university approved to offer teacher education, and provides documentation of at least three years of successful licensed experience. Admission to the program is limited and is based on the applicant’s academic work, recommendations, and professional goals. The program begins in June, and admission decisions are made in early spring. Candidates can earn a master of education (MEd) degree at the UO by taking additional course work and completing a master's project.

Continuing Administrator License

This program prepares students for continuing building and program administration—preprimary through grade twelve—and for school district office assignments, including superintendent positions. Students who complete the UO initial administrator licensure preparation program are automatically admitted to the continuing administrator program upon completion of a continuing administrator license application. Application can be made to the program if the applicant completed an initial administrator program at another institution. Applicants to the continuing program must

  • have a master’s degree
  • hold an Oregon initial administrator license
  • submit a completed application

Reading Endorsement

This option is available to those already holding an Oregon teaching license. The program’s emphasis is in literacy leadership and is for those who want to work as reading interventionists and serve as local leaders in the development, evaluation, and implementation of data-driven literacy systems.

Endorsement Requirements. Applicants must have a current teaching license, an undergraduate degree, a 3.00 grade point average, and be able to provide three letters of recommendation. If seeking a simultaneous master's degree, students must submit a formal Graduate School application.

Application and Admission. The department follows general university policy in its admission procedures. Students who transfer to the university from other institutions must meet UO entrance requirements. Information about admission to graduate study, including certificate and endorsement programs, is available on the College of Education’s website.

Faculty

Gina Biancarosa, Ann Swindells Chair in Education; associate professor (adolescent literacy, struggling readers, advanced statistical methods). BA, 1992, Boston College; EdM, 1999, EdD, 2006, Harvard. (2009)

Michael D. Bullis, Sommerville-Knight Professor (adolescent transition to adult roles, employment programs, decision-making). BPE, 1973, MS, 1978, Purdue; PhD, 1983, Oregon. (1995)

David T. Conley, professor (policy analysis in education, educational leadership, college and career readiness). BA, 1972, California, Berkeley; MA, 1983, PhD, 1986, Colorado, Boulder. (1989)

Dave DeGarmo, research associate professor (prevention science methodology, longitudinal analysis, fathers and parenting). BA, 1987, Lock Haven; MS, 1989, PhD, 1993, Akron. (2013).

Nancy Golden, professor of practice (leadership, equity, public policy). BS, 1973, Denver; MS, 1974, PhD, 1987, Oregon. (2015)

Nancy Heapes, senior lecturer (leadership and team practices, leading change, learning organizations). BA, 1979, Adams State; MA, 1987, PhD, 2007, Oregon. (1998)

Keith Hollenbeck, senior lecturer (administrative leadership, school assessment, curriculum and instruction). BA, 1976, Humboldt State; MS, 1981, PhD, 1996, Oregon. (1996)

Charles R. Martinez Jr., professor (education prevention and behavioral health disparities, equity leadership, Latino immigrant adjustment). BA, 1991, Pitzer College; MA, 1993, PhD, 1997, California School of Professional Psychology. (1998)

Stan Paine, lecturer (effective school leadership, implementing and sustaining schoolwide change, improving school outcomes). BA, 1971, St. Cloud State; MS, 1973, Southern Illinois; PhD, 1978, Oregon. (1999)

Kathleen M. Scalise, associate professor (quantitative measurement and assessment, instructional technology, computer-adaptive instructional materials). BA, 1982, MA, 2004, PhD, 2004, California, Berkeley. (2005)

Joanna Smith, lecturer (education policy, education reform, qualitative research methods). BA, 1996, Haverford College; graduate diploma in education, 1997, Melbourne; PhD, 2004, Southern California. (2013)

Joseph Stevens, professor (educational and psychological measurement and assessment, statistical and quantitative methods). BA, 1974, MA, 1976, PhD, 1983, Arizona. (2005)

Gerald Tindal, Castle-McIntosh-Knight Professor of Education (measurement and assessment, disabilities, program evaluation). BA, 1975, PhD, 1982, Minnesota. (1984)

Ilana Umansky, assistant professor (education policy analysis, quasiexperimental methods and longitudinal data analysis, English learners and immigration). BA, 1998, Wesleyan; MEd, 2003, Harvard; MA, 2012, PhD, 2014, Stanford. (2014)

Mark Van Ryzin, lecturer (social influences on adolescent development). BS, 1991, Wisconsin, Madison; MA, 2006, PhD, 2008, Minnesota, Twin Cities. (2012)

Keith Zvoch, associate professor (quantitative methods, program evaluation, statistical modeling). BS, 1992, Pittsburgh; MA, 1995, PhD, 2001, New Mexico. (2007)

Emeriti

Max G. Abbott, professor emeritus. BS, 1949, MS, 1951, Utah State; PhD, 1960, Chicago. (1966)

Keith A. Acheson, professor emeritus. BS, 1948, MS, 1951, Lewis and Clark; EdD, 1964, Stanford. (1967)

Gerald K. Bogen, professor emeritus. BA, 1959, Western Washington; MS, 1961, DEd, 1963, Oregon. (1961)

C. H. Edson, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1964, California, Berkeley; MA, 1970, Oregon; PhD, 1979, Stanford. (1973)

Robert D. Gilberts, professor emeritus. BS, 1950, Wisconsin State; MS, 1955, PhD, 1961, Wisconsin, Madison. (1970)

Arthur C. Hearn, professor emeritus. AB, 1934, MA, 1937, EdD, 1949, Stanford. (1950)

Martin J. Kaufman, professor emeritus. BA, 1964, MEd, 1965, William and Mary; PhD, 1970, Texas, Austin. (1992)

John E. Lallas, professor emeritus; executive dean emeritus. BA, 1947, Washington (Seattle); BA, 1952, Western Washington; EdD, 1956, Stanford. (1957)

Roy E. Lieuallen, chancellor emeritus, Oregon University System. BS, 1940, Pacific University; MS, 1947, Oregon; EdD, 1955, Stanford. (1961)

Philip K. Piele, professor emeritus. BA, 1957, Washington State; MS, 1963, PhD, 1968, Oregon. (1967)

Richard A. Schmuck, professor emeritus. BA, 1958, MA, 1959, PhD, 1962, Michigan. (1967)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Edward J. Kame’enui, special education and clinical sciences

Surendra Subramani, counseling psychology and human services

The department offers master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), master of education (MEd), doctor of education (DEd), and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees with a major in educational leadership.

Master’s Degrees

The Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership offers the master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), and master of education (MEd) degrees.

During the first term of graduate work, each student plans a program of study with the assistance of the student’s advisor.

The master's degrees in educational leadership focus on four major areas of specialization. Students select one of these specializations when entering the degree program:

  • Policy and Leadership. For those pursuing careers such as program coordinators or college advisors in central school administration, student support services, or staff and community relations.
  • Educational Technology and Virtual Schools. Builds theoretical knowledge and applied skills in uses of technology within schools and for leadership in technology-based programs and virtual schools.

  • Reading Degree or Endorsement. For those who want to build a deep knowledge base in literacy development, assessment, and instruction, as well as implementation and leadership of data-driven literacy systems.

  • Quantitative Research Methods in Education. Prepares those pursuing careers in educational research.

Students should consult the Graduate School section of this catalog for general university admission and degree requirements.

Doctoral Degrees

The Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership offers two doctoral degrees—DEd and PhD. The doctor of education program, which emphasizes the development of expertise in professional practice, is intended for individuals who want careers as administrators, staff developers, curriculum specialists, or positions at state and local offices. DEd students select from multiple concentration areas. The doctor of philosophy degree program emphasizes the development of expertise in educational research and statistical analysis, in educational organizations, in measurement and assessment, or as preparation for becoming a professor of education with a specialization in research.

The doctoral programs follow the general regulations governing graduate work at the university. Each PhD student plans a program with the guidance of a faculty advisor. In contrast, DEd students complete their program with a cohort and a fixed set of courses. DEd students select and complete one of three dissertation options specific to the program. This degree option may be completed concurrently with the initial administrator licensure program.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

A minimum of 142 graduate credits are required for the doctor of education (DEd) degree program; the doctor of philosophy (PhD) requires a minimum of 135 graduate credits. In both programs, at least 84 credits must be earned after admission to the program; 18 of these 84 credits are earned in Dissertation (603). Students may request to transfer as many as 48 graduate-level credits. The remaining required credits include courses in research methodology and electives.

Research methodology
Electives
EDLD 603Dissertation18
Courses in disciplinary or interdisciplinary cognate field outside the College of Education12
Residency

Three consecutive terms of full-time study (graduate credits) must be completed to meet graduate school residency requirements.

Application and Admission

The department follows general university policy in its admission procedures. Students who transfer to the university from other institutions must meet UO entrance requirements. Information about admission to graduate study is available from the department student services coordinator and on the College of Education’s website. Information about licensure and degree programs may be obtained from the director of graduate studies.

Graduate Specialization in Quantitative Research Methods

The graduate specialization in quantitative research methods is designed primarily for doctoral students who have chosen quantitative methods as their primary research tradition in the College of Education. Doctoral students in other colleges and programs may be eligible but should confirm with the sponsoring department, the Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership. The specialization is a rigorous training program in advanced quantitative research methods designed to prepare PhD students, with a competitive focus on quantitative research methods, for research and scholarship careers in education and the social sciences. Students take a minimum of 20 credits (five four-credit courses) from among the department's advanced quantitative methods course offerings, building critical expertise in quantitative methodology including applied educational statistics and research design. The course requirements include a two-course sequence in at least one advanced quantitative method and three additional quantitative methods courses.

Courses

Course usage information

EDLD 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include 21st-Century Leadership, Peer Mentoring.

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EDLD 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Human Services, Peer Health Education.

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EDLD 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Advanced Peer Support, International Educational Leadership.

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EDLD 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 422. Globalization and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the implications of globalization on education and educational systems around the world.

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EDLD 430. Comparative Education. 4 Credits.

Undergraduate-level seminar focusing on major educational issues of concern to scholars in the field of comparative education.

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EDLD 450. Data and Information Retrieval. 1 Credit.

Presents multimedia information search and organization procedures for use with public libraries, websites, and institutional and governmental clearinghouses.

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EDLD 460. Measurement and Assessment. 2 Credits.

Covers foundational knowledge in measurement and assessment.

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EDLD 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Human Services, Peer Health Education.

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EDLD 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 522. Globalization and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the implications of globalization on education and educational systems around the world.

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EDLD 530. Comparative Education. 4 Credits.

Graduate-level seminar focusing on major educational issues of concern to scholars in the field of comparative education.

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EDLD 550. Data and Information Retrieval. 1 Credit.

Presents multimedia information search and organization procedures for use with public libraries, websites, and institutional and governmental clearinghouses.

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EDLD 560. Measurement and Assessment. 2 Credits.

Covers foundational knowledge in measurement and assessment.

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EDLD 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Administrator Licensure, International Higher Education, Superintendent.

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EDLD 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Advanced Measurement and Assessment, Equity and Achievement, Foundations of Educational Research, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Master's Research Writing.

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EDLD 611. Virtual Design and Delivery. 4 Credits.

Examines the specific technology, instructional modalities, and learning environments of virtual schools. Students explore a variety of instructional design models and create learning modules that incorporate best practices.

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EDLD 612. Reading Interventions. 4 Credits.

Focuses on providing research-based reading interventions to school-age struggling readers. Includes field experience tutoring a child at the Center on Teaching and Learning Reading Clinic on campus.

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EDLD 613. Reading Research. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the empirical research that serves as the scientific basis for advancing reading pedagogy and practice.

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EDLD 618. Data-Based Decisions in Literacy. 4 Credits.

Examines data-based decision-making in the context of reading development and instruction from kindergarten through twelfth grade.

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EDLD 620. Educational Leadership. 4 Credits.

Teaches leadership concepts through simulations and exercises. Covers group expectations, basic communication skills, participative decision-making, ethics, goal setting, power, and styles of influence.

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EDLD 621. Equity and Achievement. 3 Credits.

Provides basics of data analysis and interpretations regarding achievement gaps, as well as applications of multiculturally competent practices in educational administrative settings.

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EDLD 622. Leading Change. 4 Credits.

Examines leadership through a systems-thinking lens. Students experience how adaptive leadership sustains change and why traditional operational change fails in education.

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EDLD 623. Cultural Adaptation of Evidence-Based Practices. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an advanced foundation in models and methods for the cultural adaptation of evidenced-based prevention and treatment practices in school, community, and family settings.

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EDLD 624. Leading for Equity. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to provide advanced exposure to current research and practice in leading for equity and inclusion within professional educational settings and a strong conceptual foundation in leadership.

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EDLD 625. Survey and Questionnaire Design. 4 Credits.

Students gain practical experience in the collection and analysis of social science information through the design of surveys and questionnaires.

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EDLD 628. Hierarchical Linear Models I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to multilevel modeling and hierarchical data structures, random and fixed effects, intercepts and slopes as outcomes models, estimation, centering, and two-level models. Sequence with EDLD 629.
Prereq: EDUC 642.

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EDLD 629. Hierarchical Linear Models II. 4 Credits.

Advanced topics in multilevel modeling and hierarchical data structures including three-level models with random and fixed effects, longitudinal models, and multilevel models. Sequence with EDLD 628. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: EDLD 628.

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EDLD 630. Comparative Education. 4 Credits.

Survey of higher education in selected developing countries; comparison with American higher education; relation to economic development; major problems.

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EDLD 632. Educational Policy Analysis. 4 Credits.

Systematic interpretation and analysis of issues in educational policy using techniques such as cost-benefit, competing values, impact, and effects analysis.

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EDLD 633. Structural Equation Modeling I. 4 Credits.

Theory, application, and interpretation of structural equation modeling techniques. Includes covariance structures, path diagrams, path analysis, model identification, estimation, and testing. Sequence with EDLD 634.
Prereq: EDUC 642.

Course usage information

EDLD 634. Structural Equation Modeling II. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on structural and latent variable models, including cross-validation, mean structures, comparing groups and models, latent growth-curve analyses. Sequence with EDLD 633. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: EDLD 633.

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EDLD 637. Diversity in Education. 3 Credits.

Broad exposure to issues of diversity; framework students can use to facilitate understanding of self and others in school and clinical settings.

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EDLD 638. Advanced School Law. 4 Credits.

Legal issues in school board--superintendent relations, media relations, personnel evaluation practices, student and employee rights, collective bargaining, contract management, Teacher Standards and Practices Commission and Office of Civil Rights complaints.

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EDLD 641. Standards and Accountability Systems. 4 Credits.

Rationale for standards and accountability systems. Reviews national, state, and local systems and ways to improve these systems. Associated policy and implementation.

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EDLD 644. Learning Organization. 4 Credits.

Three facets of learning organization are integrated: structural components, informational systems, and leadership processes.

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EDLD 646. Action Research. 4 Credits.

Designing and implementing quasi-experimental studies in classrooms; using outcomes to enhance educational programs and provide professional development for teachers.

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EDLD 647. Professional Issues in Education I. 1 Credit.

Examines the relationship between scholarship, planned programs of study, preparation for comprehensive exams, master's project, and dissertation.

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EDLD 648. Professional Issues in Education II. 1 Credit.

Examines the relationship between scholarship, planned programs of study, preparation for comprehensive exams, master's project, and dissertation.
Prereq: EDLD 647.

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EDLD 649. Professional Issues in Education III. 1 Credit.

Examines the relationship between scholarship, planned programs of study, preparation for comprehensive exams, master's project, and dissertation.
Prereq: EDLD 648.

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EDLD 650. Advanced Seminar Educational Research Methods. 4 Credits.

Examines special issues in the use and application of educational statistics and research design in a discussion-seminar format.
Prereq: EDUC 640.

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EDLD 655. Analysis of Teaching and Learning. 4 Credits.

Increases understanding of theories of learning and methodologies of teaching through analysis of relationship between teaching and learning.

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EDLD 656. Technology Foundations. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to computational thinking used in education, preparing them to apply technology foundations in schools.

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EDLD 657. Information Technology for Curriculum Design. 4 Credits.

Addresses integration of classroom educational technology. Participants explore and evaluate best practices on how, when, and why technology might be introduced into education.

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EDLD 658. Online Programs for Virtual Schooling. 1-3 Credits.

Students choose an area of focus and select one module to complete per credit hour.

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EDLD 659. Scholarly Writing. 4 Credits.

Develops proficiency in preparing technical reports, dissertations, grant applications, and literature syntheses to communicate educational programs, processes, and results.

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EDLD 661. Item Response Theory I. 4 Credits.

Theory and application of item response measurement models. Participation outcomes include knowledge of IRT models, terminology, and resources. Emphasis on popular models and underlying assumptions.

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EDLD 662. Item Response Theory II. 4 Credits.

Application of item response measurement models to current research. Applying theoretical knowledge to practical problems associated with measurement, data structure, and software operation.
Prereq: EDLD 661.

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EDLD 663. Measurement & Assessment: Research. 2 Credits.

Covers applied knowledge in measurement and assessment with an emphasis on use of measures for research purposes.
Coreq: EDLD 560.

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EDLD 664. Measurement & Assessment: Online Learning. 2 Credits.

Covers applied knowledge in measurement and assessment with an emphasis on assessment in an online learning context.
Coreq: EDLD 560.

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EDLD 665. Measurement & Assessment: Literacy. 2 Credits.

Covers applied knowledge in measurement and assessment with emphasis on use of reading, writing, and language assessments for instructional and intervention purposes.
Coreq: EDLD 560.

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EDLD 670. Analysis of Discrete and Categorical Data. 4 Credits.

Advanced methods for analysis of discrete data. Topics include log-linear, logit, probit, latent class, and mixture models, and other generalized linear models. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: EDUC 642.

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EDLD 675. School Finance. 3 Credits.

Overview of school finance concepts, Oregon's school financing system, political and legal considerations, taxation, state distribution formulas, school finance reform, the federal role in education.

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EDLD 681. Program Evaluation for Educational Managers I. 4 Credits.

A comprehensive survey of formative and summative evaluations of educational programs at schools and colleges.

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EDLD 683. State and Local Policy Development in Education. 4 Credits.

Analysis of the social, economic, political, and technological forces that shape educational policy at the national, state, and local levels. Developing school district policies and assessing their consequences.

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EDLD 684. Master's Project Proposal. 1 Credit.

Clarifying research topics and identifying data sources and interpretation for the master's project for initial administrator licensure under the guidance of faculty advisor.

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EDLD 685. Master's Project. 1-6 Credits.

Culminating activity for students seeking initial administrator licensure master's degree. Working under the guidance of assigned faculty advisor to complete the master's project.

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EDLD 708. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDLD 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDLD 710. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.