Counseling Psychology and Human Services

Benedict T. McWhirter, Department Head
541-346-5501
541-346-6778 fax
240 HEDCO Education Building

Programs in the Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services educate and train professionals in counseling psychology, couples and family therapy, and family and human services. Students are trained to effectively identify, treat, and prevent psychological problems in children, adolescents, adults, and families. At the doctoral level, students extend scientific knowledge through research in collaboration with faculty mentors. Field placements, practicum placements, and internships at all levels of training provide students with opportunities to practice in schools, community agencies, and clinical and research settings under the supervision of faculty members, agency personnel, and collaborating scholars.

Faculty

Kevin W. Alltucker, assistant professor (child development, juvenile delinquency, child welfare reform). BS, 1984, Oregon State; PhD, 2004, Oregon. (2004)

Tiffany Brown, lecturer (self-harm, family dynamics of addiction, collegiate recovery communities). BS, 2002, MEd, 2005, Oregon; PhD, 2009, Texas Tech. (2011)

Elizabeth Budd, Evergreen Professor; assistant professor.

Krista Chronister, associate professor (domestic violence, career counseling, community intervention). BS, 1996, Florida; MS, 2000, PhD, 2003, Oregon. (2003)

Jessica Cronce, assistant professor (health and risk behaviors among young adults, individual-focused prevention). BS, 1999, Washington (Seattle); MS, 2005, MPhil, 2006, PhD, 2009, Yale. (2015)

Nichole Kelly, Evergreen Professor; assistant professor (obesity prevention and adolescent health, eating disorders, health promotion). BS, 2004, Virginia; PhD, 2013, Virginia Commonwealth. (2016)

Shoshana D. Kerewsky, senior lecturer II (ethics; international services; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues). BA, 1983, Swarthmore; MA, 1990, Lesley; PsyD, 1998, Antioch, New England. (1996)

Atika Khurana, assistant professor (adolescent development and risk-taking, self-regulation and executive functions, family and ecological influences). BS, 2003, MS, 2005, Panjab; PhD, 2009, Ohio State. (2012)

Leslie Leve, professor (foster care, adoption, prevention science). BA. 1990, California, Santa Cruz; MS, 1991, PhD, 1995, Oregon. (2013)

Lauren Lindstrom, professor (career development, youth with disabilities, gender equity). BS, 1985, MS, 1991, PhD, 2000, Oregon. (2000)

Deanna Linville, associate professor (eating disorders and obesity intervention, couples issues). BA, 1997, MS, 2000, PhD, 2003, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. (2003)

Benedict T. McWhirter, professor (adolescents at risk, college student development, connectedness). BA, 1986, Notre Dame; MC, 1988, PhD, 1992, Arizona State. (1997)

Ellen Hawley McWhirter, Ann Swindells Professor in Counseling Psychology (adolescent career development, empowerment, youth at risk). BA, 1983, Notre Dame; MC, 1988, PhD, 1992, Arizona State. (1997)

Elizabeth Skowron, professor (early adversity and neurobehavioral systems of developing self-regulation in children and parents, differentiation of self, family interventions). BA, 1988, Ohio State; MS, 1991, PhD, 1995, State University of New York, Albany. (2012)

Tasia Smith, Evergreen Professor; assistant professor (health disparities, prevention of obesity and depression, adolescence). BA, 2008, North Carolina, Chapel Hill; MS, 2010, North Carolina, Greensboro; PhD, 2016, Florida. (2016)

Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Philip H. Knight Chair; professor (prevention of delinquency, conduct problems, peer rejection). BA, 1988, Washington (Seattle); MS, 1992, PhD, 1995, Pennsylvania State. (1996)

Surendra Subramani, senior instructor (multicultural education and cross-cultural training, leadership and management, sociology of comparative education); diversity coordinator. BS, 1986, Oregon; MBA, 1993, Oregon State; PhD, 2000, Oregon. (2004)

Jeff Todahl, associate professor (child abuse and neglect prevention, intimate partner violence, community engagement). BA, 1985, Western Washington; MS, 1989, Seattle Pacific; PhD, 1995, Florida State. (1999)

Karrie P. Walters, instructor (human services, child and family interventions, prevention and social justice). BA, 1996, North Texas; MA, 2001, Minnesota, Twin Cities; PhD, 2010, Oregon. (2010)

Courtesy

Joseph Arpaia, courtesy assistant professor (clinical hypnosis, autonomic nervous system, mediation and psychotherapy). BS, 1982, California Institute of Technology; MD, 1990, California, Irvine. (2005)

Philip A. Fisher, professor. See Psychology.

Richard D. Freund, courtesy assistant professor (research methods, community college counseling, cognitive therapy). BA, 1966, Brown; PhD, 1971, Stanford. (1975)

Arthur Pearl, adjunct professor (democracy and human services). PhD, 1960, California, Berkeley. (2010)

Emeriti

Henry F. Dizney, professor emeritus. BS, 1954, Southeast Missouri State; MEd, 1955, Wayne State; PhD, 1959, Iowa. (1967)

Gordon A. Dudley, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1956, Kalamazoo; MA, 1959, Colorado; EdD, 1971, Harvard. (1967)

Sally Fullerton, professor emerita. BS, 1956, Oregon State; MA, 1960, Cornell; PhD, 1970, Oregon. (1970)

Weston H. Morrill, professor emeritus. BS, 1960, MS, 1961, Brigham Young; PhD, 1966, Missouri, Columbia. (1990)

Janet Moursund, associate professor emerita. BA, 1958, Knox; MS, 1961, PhD, 1963, Wisconsin, Madison. (1967)

Anita Runyan, associate professor emerita. BS, 1956, Pacific Union; MS, 1968, PhD, 1972, Oregon. (1972)

Saul Toobert, professor emeritus. BA, 1947, California, Berkeley; PhD, 1965, Oregon. (1963)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Family and Human Services

Jessica Cronce, Major Director
340 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-2519

The nationally accredited family and human services major leads to a bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS) or bachelor of education (BEd) degree. It is designed for students who want to help children, youth, adults, and families learn effective ways to confront the problems in their lives. Participants gain a broad understanding of learning and development, intervention, professional communication, prevention, and agency policy and practices through a combination of course work and field experiences in human service agencies.

Careers

Graduates find work as entry-level professionals in early intervention, child-abuse prevention, youth services and probation, corrections, mental health, and drug and alcohol rehabilitation and treatment. Many go on to pursue graduate study in education, social work, family and human services, counseling psychology, or special education.

Application Deadline

Students must formally apply to enter the family and human services major. Specific information about the admission deadline may be found on the College of Education website.

Applicants advanced past the written file review are invited for an interview. This group interview is required for admission to the program.

Admission Requirements

At the time of application, students must have

  1. Completed 50–55 credits, with a cumulative GPA of 2.50. Demonstrated satisfactory progress toward completion of the university writing requirement and 8 credits in each of the general-education groups: arts and letters, social science, and science.
  2. Completed the premajor core with a cumulative GPA of 2.75. Transfer students should meet with the department advisor
  3. Demonstrated volunteer experience with children, youth, adults, and/or families
  4. Agreed to and subsequently passed a criminal background check for full admission to the program
  5. Agreed to and subsequently passed a UO Student Conduct and Community Standards check for full admission to the program
Premajor Core

The premajor core courses, completion of which is a prerequisite for admission to the major, present various theories of community service, education, and societal issues relevant to developing professionals in human services. Through core courses, students develop strategies for working with people based on research and practice, and learn how to use evaluation information to meet the needs of clients and children.

Professional Studies

The family and human services major consists of course work and field-based experiences in human service agencies, taken during the junior and senior years. A field project is completed in the senior year.

Field Experiences

Students participate in supervised activities in public and private human services agencies and organizations. Typically, there are three junior field studies experiences at three different agencies. There are two to three terms of senior placements at the same agency.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services4
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies and Field Experiences
FHS 327Organizational Issues in Human Services4
FHS 328Theory of Family Systems4
FHS 329Youth Psychopathology in Context4
FHS 330–331Individual and Group Interventions I-II7
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Beginning Field Studies I,II,III)9
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Advanced Field Studies I,II)8
FHS 407Seminar: [Topic] (Junior-Senior Supervision Issues) 15-6
FHS 420Research in Human Services4
Select two of the following:8
Prevention of Youth Violence
Prevention of Interpersonal Violence
3 to 4 credits of Counseling Psychology (CPSY), Substance Abuse Prevention Program (SAPP), or other relevant course work
FHS 491–493Junior Professional Practices and Issues I-III9
FHS 494–495Senior Professional Practices and Issues6
FHS 496Senior Project Proposal1
FHS 497Senior Project2
Total Credits83-84
1

5 credits required to graduate.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services4
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies and Field Experiences
FHS 327Organizational Issues in Human Services4
FHS 328Theory of Family Systems4
FHS 329Youth Psychopathology in Context4
FHS 330–331Individual and Group Interventions I-II7
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Beginning Field Studies I,II,III)9
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Advanced Field Studies I,II)8
FHS 407Seminar: [Topic] (Junior-Senior Supervision Issues) 15-6
FHS 420Research in Human Services4
Select two of the following:8
Prevention of Youth Violence
Prevention of Interpersonal Violence
3 to 4 credits of Counseling Psychology (CPSY), Substance Abuse Prevention Program (SAPP), or other relevant course work
FHS 491–493Junior Professional Practices and Issues I-III9
FHS 494–495Senior Professional Practices and Issues6
FHS 496Senior Project Proposal1
FHS 497Senior Project2
Total Credits83-84
1

5 credits required to graduate.

Bachelor of Education Degree Requirements

Premajor Core
FHS 213Issues for Children and Families4
FHS 215Exploring Family and Human Services4
FHS 216Diversity in Human Services4
Professional Studies and Field Experiences
FHS 327Organizational Issues in Human Services4
FHS 328Theory of Family Systems4
FHS 329Youth Psychopathology in Context4
FHS 330–331Individual and Group Interventions I-II7
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Beginning Field Studies I,II,III)9
FHS 406Special Problems: [Topic] (Advanced Field Studies I,II)8
FHS 407Seminar: [Topic] (Junior-Senior Supervision Issues) 15-6
FHS 420Research in Human Services4
Select two of the following:8
Prevention of Youth Violence
Prevention of Interpersonal Violence
3 to 4 credits of Counseling Psychology (CPSY), Substance Abuse Prevention Program (SAPP), or other relevant course work
FHS 491–493Junior Professional Practices and Issues I-III9
FHS 494–495Senior Professional Practices and Issues6
FHS 496Senior Project Proposal1
FHS 497Senior Project2
Total Credits83-84
1

5 credits required to graduate.

Family and Human Services—Early Childhood Emphasis

Kathy M. Moxley-South, Coordinator
541-346-5143
358 HEDCO Education Building

The early childhood emphasis of the family and human services major is a 60-credit, roughly two-year bachelor's degree program that satisfies the federal requirements for teaching in a Head Start program with a mix of human services and early childhood courses. In addition, it qualifies the graduate to pursue a wide variety of related career paths such as early childhood teacher, family advocate, case worker, or other careers in human services. It also prepares the student to pursue an advanced degree, such as a master's degree in social work or early intervention–special education.

Service-Learning Program

Deanna Chappell Belcher, Director
541-346-8285
370 HEDCO Education Building

Service-learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. The Service-Learning Program offers courses along with a service component (available for variable credit, depending on volunteer hours performed by the student). Courses are open to students from all majors, and are flexible to allow students to choose to focus on a community issue that's important to them, and to volunteer with an organization that meets a real community need. When students pair academic work with learning outside the classroom, each enriches the other. Through service-learning, students not only learn the practical applications of their studies, they become actively contributing citizens and community leaders

Substance Abuse Prevention Program

Ruth Bichsel, Director
541-346-4135
180 Esslinger Hall
sapp.uoregon.edu

The Substance Abuse Prevention Program (SAPP) is an academic training program that provides course work in the areas of alcohol and drug prevention, intervention, treatment, and recovery, as well as related topics. The typical SAPP instructor has extensive applied experience working with clients, organizations, and communities. Most hold advanced degrees and certifications or licenses in their area of expertise.

Students, professionals, and community members may take SAPP courses to broaden their knowledge base, earn college credit, or complete an area of concentration in the program. The program offers the course work required to pursue state credentials for the the certified prevention specialist (CPS) and the certified alcohol and drug counselor (CADC I and CADC II) through the Addiction Counselor Certification Board of Oregon.

The department offers master’s degrees with majors in counseling, family, and human services or prevention science. The department also offers doctoral degrees with majors in counseling psychology or prevention science. The department’s faculty also provides courses for other College of Education and university programs.

Master’s Degrees in Counseling, Family, and Human Services

The counseling, family, and human services major leads to a master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), or master of education (MEd) degree.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114
Additional Requirement

The candidate must demonstrate proficiency in a second language.

Master of Science Degree Requirements

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114

The MA and MS degrees are earned by enrolled doctoral candidates who meet the requirements as they complete a PhD degree. Some graduate courses taken at another accredited institution may be applied to the requirements.

Master of Education Degree Requirements

Core Courses

Psychological foundations15
Research competencies20
Practitioner competencies54
Professional competencies7
Elective courses and seminars18
Total Credits114

Master's Degrees in Prevention Science

The prevention science major leads to a master of science (MS) or master of education (MEd) degree.

Program objectives include

  • instruction in a generation of research-based knowledge focused on increasing the understanding of risk and protective factors and processes related to the prevention of problems in human populations
  • the translation of basic research findings into effective programs and policies that positively affect the development and well-being of children, youth, adults, families, and their communities
  • the development of successful partnerships with community, county, state, and national organizations to disseminate effective programs into routine practice in a variety of settings

A successful graduate of the program should be able to

  • describe theoretical models, risk and protective factors, preventive interventions (especially evidence-based interventions), and implementation practices related to prevention science programs and policies for diverse populations
  • understand and adhere to the standards of knowledge for prevention science, including best practices in research design and methods, data analysis, interpretation, dissemination, self-evaluation, and rigorous ethical practice
  • show a commitment to multicultural competence, social justice, and enhancing human welfare in their scholarly work and practice related to prevention science
  • display professionalism in their relationships with faculty, staff, peers, and community partners in a variety of settings

The course work lays a solid foundation for students interested in careers in academia or local, state, or national prevention and public health agencies.

Application and Admission

Students are admitted to start fall term only. Prospective applicants may find detailed admission policies and procedures on the UO prevention science website. The closing date for receipt of completed applications is posted on the website for entry the following fall term.

Applicants are evaluated on the following:

  1. Academic record

  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores

  3. Related research and work experiences

  4. A statement of purpose in seeking admission

  5. Letters of recommendation

  6. An interview

Only completed applications are reviewed. Applicants must gather the requested supporting papers and submit them with the application forms as one package. Graduate training includes completion of a research paper.

Master of Science

The two-year MS degree in prevention science is intended for students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a prevention science–related discipline or have human development, psychology, education, or prevention science experience, and an interest in advanced training in statistics-methodology and research beyond what is offered in the one-year MEd program. Students applying to the MS are likely to have clearly defined academic goals and seek more in-depth scientific and methodological training in prevention science and program evaluation. This masters’ degree option provides greater opportunities for students to develop long-term collaborations in research centers and with faculty members in the College of Education, but does not require the commitment involved in completing the PhD.

Requirements
Six courses in psychological foundations19
Five courses in research methods and statistics20
Research courses9
Elective courses9
Additional courses6
Total Credits63

Master of Education

The one-year MEd degree in prevention science is primarily intended for

  • students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in a prevention science–related discipline or have human development, psychology, education, or prevention science experience, are currently working in the profession, and wish to enhance their education to improve their career opportunities in the field
  • students who wish to refocus their education from a nonscience or noneducation bachelor’s background, such as a humanities undergraduate degree, to gain training and skill development relevant to prevention science, program evaluation, and research in the human services professions for future career or academic study interests
  • students who are considering pursuing doctoral study or additional applied master's training and wish to improve their content knowledge and research skills to make themselves more competitive for other, more advanced graduate programs
Requirements
Four courses in psychological foundations12
Three courses in research methods and statistics12
Elective courses15
Additional courses6
Total Credits45

Couples and Family Therapy

Deanna Linville-Knobelspiesse, Program Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-0921

This two-year program trains students as professional family therapists in preparation for state licensure. This intensive training combines a strong theoretical base in systemic therapy with applied clinical experience. The clinical practicum includes 500 client contact hours with 200 hours in relational systems (50 percent with couples or families) and 80 hours of individual and group supervision. Supervision at the Center for Family Therapy involves live observation, participation in reflecting teams, and video- and audiotaped sessions. In addition, students see clients at community agencies, clinics, and therapist practices. The Couples and Family Therapy Program is one of two programs in Oregon to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education and approved by the Oregon Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and Therapists.

Application and Admission

Detailed admission policies and procedures for the couples and family therapy specialization are available on the couples and family therapy website. Students are admitted fall term only. Completed applications must be received by the deadline published on the website for the following fall term. Only completed applications are reviewed for admission. Applicants are evaluated on

  1. quality of work
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or Millers Analogies Test (MAT) scores
  3. related work, background, or experience
  4. résumé with statement of purpose
  5. diversity essay response
  6. three letters of recommendation
  7. an interview.

Notices about disposition of applications are mailed by April 15.

Applicants must pass a criminal background check before they may enroll.

Theoretical foundations19
Individual and family development25
Research competencies4
Professional ethics4
Clinical practice28
Additional courses10
Total Credits90

Doctoral Degree in Counseling Psychology

Ellen McWhirter, Training Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-2443

The doctoral program is one of two counseling psychology programs in the Pacific Northwest that is accredited by the American Psychological Association Commission on Accreditation (750 First Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20002-4242, 202-336-5979), and it is recognized as acceptable for licensure by the Oregon Board of Psychologist Examiners. The program has been accredited since 1955.

Earning a doctoral degree in counseling psychology typically requires five to six years of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. This period includes a one-year, full-time, supervised predoctoral internship. Students must complete a PhD dissertation that demonstrates a high standard of scholarship and the ability to conduct independent, original research. Students may enter the program with a bachelor’s or a master’s degree.

The program follows an ecological model of training embedded in the scientist-practitioner tradition. As such, the program trains psychologists to work with individuals, children and families, and groups within their contexts. Students learn to consider human behavior as interactive processes rather than centered in the individual; they learn to use preventive and remedial intervention strategies for behavioral and emotional problems. Students learn evidence-based counseling interventions for assessing and intervening in the many levels of context in which human problems emerge. These include learning culturally sensitive assessment and intervention strategies designed to increase understanding and effect change at the individual, familial, school, and community levels. Students are instructed to critically reflect on the science and practice of psychology and engage in social justice advocacy as core to their training.

Students participate in integrated classroom, practicum, and fieldwork activities in research, prevention, and intervention with children and adults, families, groups, and communities. The doctoral program prepares psychologists who can make a significant contribution to the field through scholarly research and professional practice. Training experience may be had at the UO Counseling and Testing Center, Lane Community College Counseling Center, UO Prevention Science Institute, and in community agencies or nonprofit research centers.

Graduates are prepared to work as researchers, practitioners, and educators in community mental health centers, research institutions, institutions of higher education, medical settings, managed health-care organizations, community college and university counseling centers, juvenile corrections agencies, human resources departments in business, and career counseling agencies.

PhD Requirements

Psychological foundations28
Four-term doctoral-level statistics sequence16
Four courses in philosophy of research, research design, and measurement35
CPSY 603Dissertation18
Practitioner competencies60
Professional competencies15
Additional courses6
Total Credits178

Application and Admission

Students are admitted fall term only. Prospective applicants may find detailed admission policies and procedures on the counseling psychology website. The closing date for receipt of completed applications is posted on the website for entry the following fall term. Notices about the disposition of applications are e-mailed by April 15.

Applicants are evaluated on

  1. academic record
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores
  3. related work, research, and life experiences
  4. a statement of purpose in seeking admission
  5. letters of recommendation
  6. an interview

Only completed applications are reviewed. The application process is online only; see the website for procedures.

Graduate training includes research training, completion of a predissertation research project, and completion of a dissertation as well as practicum and internship placements in which students work with children and adults, families, groups, and communities.

Doctoral Degree in Prevention Science

Leslie Leve, Program Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-9601

The doctoral program leads to a doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in prevention science. This research-intensive degree program can be completed in four years, with students earning an MS en route to the PhD. This program is intended for students who have completed a bachelor’s or master’s degree in a prevention science–related discipline or have significant human development, psychology, social science, education, or prevention science experience. Students must complete a PhD dissertation that demonstrates a high standard of scholarship and the ability to conduct independent, original research.

Program objectives include

  • instruction in a generation of research-based knowledge focused on increasing the understanding of risk and protective factors and processes related to the prevention of problems in human populations
  • the translation of basic research findings into effective programs and policies that positively affect the development and well-being of children, youth, adults, families, and their communities
  • the development of successful partnerships with community, county, state, and national organizations to disseminate effective programs into routine practice in a variety of settings

A successful graduate of the program should be able to

  • describe theoretical models, risk and protective factors, preventive interventions (especially evidence-based interventions), and implementation practices related to prevention science programs and policies for diverse populations
  • understand and adhere to the standards of knowledge for prevention science, including best practices in research design and methods, data analysis, interpretation, dissemination, self-evaluation, and rigorous ethical practice
  • show a commitment to multicultural competence, social justice, and enhancing human welfare in their scholarly work and practice related to prevention science
  • display professionalism in their relationships with faculty, staff, peers, and community partners in a variety of settings

The course work lays a solid foundation for students interested in careers in academia or local, state, or national prevention and public health agencies.

PhD Requirements

Eight courses in psychological foundations27
Eight courses in doctoral-level research methods and statistics32
Research10
Specialty area courses12
PREV 603Dissertation18
Additional courses3
Total Credits102

Application and Admission

Students are admitted fall term only. Prospective applicants may find detailed admission policies and procedures on the prevention science website. The closing date for receipt of completed applications is posted on the website for entry the following fall term. Notices about the disposition of applications are mailed by May 1.

Applicants are evaluated on

  1. academic record
  2. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores
  3. related research and work experiences
  4. a statement of purpose in seeking admission
  5. letters of recommendation
  6. an interview

Only completed applications are reviewed. Applicants must gather the requested supporting papers and submit them with the application forms as one package. Graduate training includes completion of a research paper and a dissertation.

Specialization in Spanish Language Psychological Service and Research

Ellen McWhirter, Director
240 HEDCO Education Building
541-346-2443

The 16-credit Spanish language psychological service and research specialization addresses the deficit in family-centered prevention services for the Spanish-speaking Latino community. It is open to students enrolled in the accredited graduate programs of counseling psychology, couples and family therapy, and school psychology who also meet the eligibility criteria. The specialization provides students with skills to support the provision of culturally relevant mental health services and research in Spanish for Latino populations. It is designed to enhance preexisting linguistic and multicultural competencies and increase cultural understanding of US Spanish-speaking populations. Students critically assess the unique social, historical, political, and cultural contexts that shape the experiences of Latinos in the United States, with particular attention to conditions of social injustice and inequity, and how such conditions influence the health and well-being of Latino Spanish-speaking communities.

Eligibility for this specialization includes maintaining good standing in one of the three specified College of Education graduate programs focused on mental health services, approval from the student's advisor and the director of the specialization, and preexisting competencies in Spanish. 

Requirements

CPSY 612Professional Ethics3
CPSY 615Counseling Diverse Populations4
CPSY 626Psychological Services for Latinos2
CPSY 508Workshop: [Topic] (Topics in Latino Mental Health)3
CPSY 609Practicum: [Topic] (three terms)3
CPSY 609Practicum: [Topic] 11
or CFT 609 Practicum: [Topic]
or SPSY 609 Practicum: [Topic]
Total Credits16
1

A practicum or externship in the student’s major in which the student performs clinical work with Spanish-speaking clients.

Additional Requirements
Students must participate in 20 hours (minimum) of continuous learning experiences and educational-cultural events, complete a capstone project, and maintain good standing in the departmental graduate program.
 

Courses

Course usage information

CPSY 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 217. Foundations of Student Health and Well-Being. 3 Credits.

Presents the risks and protective factors for college students during the developmental stage of emerging adulthood, and strategies for reducing risk and enhancing well-being.

Course usage information

CPSY 401. Research. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 417. Introduction to Counseling Psychology Profession. 2 Credits.

An examination of counseling psychology as a specialty that emphasizes multicultural approaches to serving individuals, families, and groups through clinical practice and research.

Course usage information

CPSY 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Ecological Bases of Behavior is a current topic.

Course usage information

CPSY 611. Ethics Discussion for Counseling Psychology. 1 Credit.

Focuses on current ethical standards of professional practice for psychologists and Oregon’s legal requirements, applied to roles and settings of counseling psychologists.

Course usage information

CPSY 612. Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

Ethical and legal concerns in the professional practice of psychology. Ethical theory and decision-making processes; legal aspects of client-psychologist relationships.

Course usage information

CPSY 613. Introduction to Counseling Psychology. 3 Credits.

Historical foundations of counseling psychology. Major theories and theorists. Counseling as an ecological and context-sensitive interactive process. Settings and roles of the profession.

Course usage information

CPSY 614. Theories of Counseling. 3 Credits.

Overview of selected historical and current counseling theories.

Course usage information

CPSY 615. Counseling Diverse Populations. 4 Credits.

Influence of gender, race, ethnicity, and other factors related to diverse populations on the identity-formation process in contemporary society. Applications to counseling psychology.

Course usage information

CPSY 617. Theories of Career Development. 3 Credits.

Addresses life-span career development including issues, concepts, and definitions; theories of career development and choice; intervention in strategies; and career resources in the context of a multicultural society.

Course usage information

CPSY 621. Lifespan Developmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Understanding continuity and change in human development and the ways in which the development of children, adolescents, and adults can be enhanced. Repeatable once for a maximum of 6 credits.

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CPSY 622. Psychological Assessment II. 4 Credits.

Selection and administration of instruments and procedures for generating personality and career assessment reports. Emphasizes the integration of assessment into the intervention planning process. Includes laboratory.

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CPSY 626. Psychological Services for Latinos. 2 Credits.

Provide graduate students with content specific to carrying out human services work and research with those who are Latino and/or Spanish-speaking.

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CPSY 633. Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course introduces approaches, concepts, methods, and perspectives of epidemiology as applied to current public health issues and prevention science research and practice.

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CPSY 635. Social Aspects of Behavior. 4-5 Credits.

This course introduces research and concepts related to social influences on human behavior, including prejudice, conformity, aggression, prosocial behavior, internalized social norms, and social cognition.

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CPSY 642. Child-Family Interventions. 4 Credits.

Empirically oriented interventions with children and families, ranging from early childhood through adolescence. Integrates developmental and intervention sciences.

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CPSY 643. Community and Preventive Interventions. 3 Credits.

Research and practice in community intervention designed to prevent mental and physical health problems. Includes health promotion, work-site interventions, school and community prevention programs.

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CPSY 645. Health Promotion and Equity. 3 Credits.

This course introduces theoretical and empirical work in prevention-focused health psychology, integrating cultural, developmental, and community psychology concepts as they pertain to health related behaviors.

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CPSY 651. Advanced Individual Counseling Intervention. 3 Credits.

Focuses on applying interpersonal process and problem-management approaches to individual counseling and psychotherapy; using assessment information in treatment planning.

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CPSY 654. Supervision and Agency Administration. 4 Credits.

Principles, methods, and ethical practice of clinical supervision. Theory of and research about models of counselor professional development. Review of supervision process and outcome research. Includes laboratory.

Course usage information

CPSY 704. Internship: [Topic]. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 706. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 708. Special Topics: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CPSY 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

CFT 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 412. Healthy Relationships. 3 Credits.

Addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors associated with engaging in healthy relationships.

Course usage information

CFT 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 512. Healthy Relationships. 3 Credits.

Addresses the knowledge, skills, and behaviors associated with engaging in healthy relationships.

Course usage information

CFT 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

A current topic is Methods.

Course usage information

CFT 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CFT 612. Parenting Interventions. 2 Credits.

Examines evidence-based practices for parenting children and adolescents, including trauma-focused parenting strategies.

Course usage information

CFT 614. Child Mental Health and Diagnosis. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes the etiology, nosology, phenomenology, and diagnosis of mental health disorders in children. Examines social and cultural assumptions about "normal"versus "pathological" behavior, cognition, and emotion.

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CFT 615. Introduction to Marriage Family Therapy. 3 Credits.

Surveys the distinct disciplines of marriage and family therapy.

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CFT 616. Systems Theory Foundations. 3 Credits.

Surveys macro theories and their relationship to families and family therapy with emphasis on systems, communications, and ecological theories.

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CFT 620. Mental Health and Diagnosis. 3 Credits.

Study of maladaptive behavior, treatment, and prevention emphasizing the integrative contributions of biological, behavior, cognitive, psychodynamic, humanist-existential, and community perspectives, including the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders."

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CFT 621. Ethics Discussion. 1 Credit.

Provides an opportunity to more fully examine and discuss ethical and legal considerations for couples and family therapists with emphasis on relational-systemic elements of ethical decision-making.

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CFT 622. Relational Assessment. 1 Credit.

Examines evidence-based practices for assessment in couples therapy. Integrates systems and communication theory with emerging contextual and behavior-assessment models.

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CFT 624. Group Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Presents basic elements of group process; includes introduction to group work, guidelines for multicultural practice, ethical and professional issues in group practice, and group leadership.

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CFT 625. Violence, Trauma, and Healing. 4 Credits.

Theories and research on the acceleration and cessation of violence in the family and assessment of responses to violent family behaviors and to perpetrators, survivors, and families.

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CFT 626. Human Sexuality in Counseling. 3 Credits.

Increases understanding and clinical abilities for working with couples; special emphasis on the role of intimacy and sexual relationships.

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CFT 627. Advanced Theories in Relational Therapy. 4 Credits.

Studies theories and models of couples and family therapy; self-evaluation of clinical work. Examines integration, specifically the "metaframeworks" model,solution-focused therapy, and emotionally focused therapy.

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CFT 628. Addiction and Recovery. 3 Credits.

Increases the conceptual understanding and skills of family therapists working with contemporary issues; emphasis on addictions and addiction recovery.

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CFT 629. Intimate Partner Therapy. 3 Credits.

Application of systems theory to problems within relationships and their resolution. Includes research findings, assessment, motivation, change, content and process, ethics, and social-macro considerations.

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CFT 630. Wellness and Spirituality. 3 Credits.

Provides an understanding of existential issues, spirituality, and wellness. Working with clients' life-cycle stages and health-stress issues; resources to promote wellness.

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CFT 632. Medical Family Therapy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the theory, fundamentals, and practical applications of medical family therapy.

Courses

Course usage information

FHS 199. . 1-5 Credits.

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FHS 213. Issues for Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Examines issues and problems confronting children and families in modern society. Issues such as disability, poverty, health care, addictions, racism, and violence are addressed.

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FHS 215. Exploring Family and Human Services. 4 Credits.

Explores the historic basis and current design of family and human services. Emphasizes services to children, youth, adults, and families.

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FHS 216. Diversity in Human Services. 4 Credits.

Provides glimpses into various social groups and the rudimentary knowledge, awareness, and skills required to function effectively as a social-service worker within diverse populations.

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FHS 320. Instructional Methods in Early Childhood I. 1 Credit.

Explores an array of knowledge- and evidenced-based practices that ensure excellence in teaching young children.

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FHS 321. Instructional Methods in Early Childhood II. 1 Credit.

Explores communication, language, and social emotional development in young children. Teaching strategies for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in early childhood settings that promote social communication.

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FHS 322. Instructional Methods in Early Childhood III. 1 Credit.

Explores early literacy, print awareness, group reading, evaluation of children’s books, and literacy for dual-language learners.

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FHS 327. Organizational Issues in Human Services. 4 Credits.

Theories and policies on the organization of human services. Emphasizes the evaluation of outcomes of services for children, youth, adults, and families.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 328. Theory of Family Systems. 4 Credits.

Examines families from an academic and evidence-based perspective. Integration of relevant contemporary family issues with personal experience to develop competencies related to human services profession.
Prereq: major status.

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FHS 329. Youth Psychopathology in Context. 4 Credits.

Presents child and adolescent psychopathology and problems within a diagnostic framework. Topics address psychosocial issues for youth in family and cultural contexts.
Prereq: major status.

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FHS 330. Individual and Group Interventions I. 4 Credits.

Strategies and interventions that enhance growth and change in individuals and families. Interventions range from specific individual techniques to strategies for small groups and families.
Prereq: major status.

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FHS 331. Individual and Group Interventions II. 3 Credits.

Strategies and interventions that enhance growth and change.
Prereq: FHS 330.

Course usage information

FHS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 404. . 1-12 Credits.

Course usage information

FHS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 420. Research in Human Services. 4 Credits.

Use of research to reform practice in human services. Trends and issues in assessment and evaluation in human services are provided.

Course usage information

FHS 430. Foundations in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

Explores the history and theories of early education with a focus on societal factors that affect development.

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FHS 431. Early Childhood and Human Services Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Explores the theoretical and historical context of primary curriculum models used in early childhood education and human service settings that serve at-risk children and families.

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FHS 432. Assessment in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

Explores educational, environmental, and family assessments in early childhood education and human service settings.

Course usage information

FHS 482. Prevention of Youth Violence. 4 Credits.

Research and practice in community interventions designed to prevent youth violence. Includes home, school, and community-based interventions.

Course usage information

FHS 483. Prevention of Interpersonal Violence. 4 Credits.

Examines interpersonal violence and community-based prevention using ecological, multicultural, international frameworks. Emphasizes assessment, prevention, intervention, and simultaneous occurrence of adult violence and child maltreatment.

Course usage information

FHS 491. Junior Professional Practices and Issues I. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional. Includes ethical standards for professional practice.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 492. Junior Professional Practices and Issues II. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional. Includes ethical standards for professional practice.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 493. Junior Professional Practices and Issues III. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional. Includes ethical standards for professional practice.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 494. Senior Professional Practices and Issues. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 495. Senior Professional Practices and Issues. 3 Credits.

Examines issues and behaviors associated with being a community service professional.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 496. Senior Project Proposal. 1 Credit.

Students create a written proposal outlining rationale, project description, and timelines for completing the senior project.
Prereq: major status.

Course usage information

FHS 497. Senior Project. 1-2 Credits.

Students develop a written product or project in conjunction with faculty members and field site personnel.
Prereq: FHS 496.

Course usage information

FHS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FHS 582. Prevention of Youth Violence. 4 Credits.

Research and practice in community interventions designed to prevent youth violence. Includes home, school, and community-based interventions.

Course usage information

FHS 583. Prevention of Interpersonal Violence. 4 Credits.

Examines interpersonal violence and community-based prevention using ecological, multicultural, international frameworks. Emphasizes assessment, prevention, intervention, and simultaneous occurrence of adult violence and child maltreatment.

Courses

Course usage information

PREV 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PREV 631. Introduction to Prevention Science. 3 Credits.

Overview of theory, research, and practice in prevention science and health promotion, including foundational concepts, translation of theory into intervention, methodology, and implementation.

Course usage information

PREV 632. Risk and Resilience in Adolescents. 3 Credits.

Research and theory related to risk and resiliency processes during adolescence and young adulthood. Focuses on populations at elevated risk for adverse outcomes.

Course usage information

PREV 633. Contemporary Issues in Public Health. 3 Credits.

This course introduces approaches, concepts, methods, and perspectives of epidemiology as applied to current public health issues and prevention science research and practice.

Course usage information

PREV 634. Implementation Science. 3 Credits.

Provides a framework for examining implementation science and its application to clinical and community-based research.
Prereq: CPSY 631 or CPSY 643; a graduate-level statistics course.

Courses

Course usage information

SAPP 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SAPP 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.